hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Medford (Massachusetts, United States) 196 0 Browse Search
Cash 114 0 Browse Search
David Lee Child 85 1 Browse Search
Stephen Hall 65 3 Browse Search
Mch 44 0 Browse Search
Isaac Royall 41 9 Browse Search
John Willis 33 3 Browse Search
William Henry Whitmore 28 0 Browse Search
School House (Pennsylvania, United States) 28 0 Browse Search
Samuel Brooks 26 6 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 2.. Search the whole document.

Found 119 total hits in 64 results.

... 2 3 4 5 6 7
October 5th, 1767 AD (search for this): chapter 11
s followeth— Viz. my Heifer comeing two years Old. . . . also the Bedstead which she lays on and the little Bed which she says she Bought: also some Pewter (Viz.) two Pewter dishes & four Pewter Plates, one pint and one half pint Pewter Porringer, my smallest Iron Pottage Pot, two Iron Skillets, one pair of Andirons my Tin Still, the Spining wheel and—four chairs. [some chamber furniture] also I do give the said Cloe her Time and Set her Free Immediately after my Decease. Benj. Willis October 5, 1767. And the administrator of the estate of Benj. Willis credits himself: by pasturing the deceased's negro woman's heifer, £ 4, 10s. by sundry clothes for negro man Prince, £35. Similar kind treatment is mentioned by Miss Wild in her article on Medford in the Revolution in the case of Zachariah Pool, who left money in his will for the care of his slave, Scipio. I have set forth, with little comment, the few brief facts relating to slavery in our town. Perhaps, on the whol<
chiefly in the West Indies and the Southern colonies; the balance came North. The mainspring of the traffic was rum; and Brooks in his History of Medford gives an extract from a captain's account-book showing balance between rum and slaves. Very few whole cargoes, however, came to Massachusetts; and only a small number of ships from Boston engaged in the African trade. In 1703 a duty of £ 4 was imposed on every negro imported. Slaves were most numerous in Massachusetts about 1745; in 1763 the ratio of whites to blacks, the latter including many free negroes, was 45: 1. When the Massachusetts Body of Liberties was drawn up in 1641, the question of slavery was treated as follows: Art. 91. There shall never be any bond-slavery, villanage, or captivity amongst us, unless it be lawful captives taken in just wars, and such strangers as willingly sell themselves, or are sold to us. Commenting on this article, Palfrey, in his History of New England, says: Born of slave mother
London, A Negro Man of the Widow Mary Bradshaw's Died Oct. 15, 1760. Caesar, Negro Servant of Ebenezar Brooks of Medford and Zipporah negro Servant of Nathl Brown of Charlestown, married June 23, 1757. As would be inferred, the number of slave owners was not large, and they were the leading men of the town: the Halls, Brookses and Willises, Dr. Simon Tufts, Rev. Mr. Turrell, and, above all, Col. Isaac Royall. This first Royall brought with him from Antigua a number of slaves and in 1737 petitioned that the duty on them be abated, but no further action than to lay it on the table was taken. He probably had at least fifteen at a time, and the slave-quarters, so-called, have become an object of considerable historical interest. The entire number of persons holding slaves in the last half of the 18th century probably did not exceed thirty, the town records giving, indirectly, the names of twenty. Partial list of slaveholders: Capt. Caleb Brooks, Ebenezer Brooks, Samuel Bro
erned, was through trade with Barbadoes, a British island in the West Indies. Slaves purchased in Africa were sold chiefly in the West Indies and the Southern colonies; the balance came North. The mainspring of the traffic was rum; and Brooks in his History of Medford gives an extract from a captain's account-book showing balance between rum and slaves. Very few whole cargoes, however, came to Massachusetts; and only a small number of ships from Boston engaged in the African trade. In 1703 a duty of £ 4 was imposed on every negro imported. Slaves were most numerous in Massachusetts about 1745; in 1763 the ratio of whites to blacks, the latter including many free negroes, was 45: 1. When the Massachusetts Body of Liberties was drawn up in 1641, the question of slavery was treated as follows: Art. 91. There shall never be any bond-slavery, villanage, or captivity amongst us, unless it be lawful captives taken in just wars, and such strangers as willingly sell themselves, o
... 2 3 4 5 6 7