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enty-two of these leathern buckets, inscribed with the name of the owner and the year of his membership, which the present company prize as relics of auld lang syne. Mr. Francis A. Wait has hanging in the front hall of his house three buckets inscribed as follows: One, John A. Fulton1785. Two, Nathan Wait1810. The following are those in the hook and ladder carriage room: Two, J. Swan1785. Two, Ebenezer Hall1785. Two, Benjamin Fisk1800. One, Daniel Swan1821. Two, Robert Bacon1822. Two, Thomas R. Peck1827. Two, Abnah Bartlettno date. One, E. Hallno date. One, Daniel Lawrence1841. One, Timothy Cottingno date. One, Samuel Chaseno date. Two, Andrew Blanchard, Columbian Eagle Fire Society. One, Nathan Sawyerno date. One, Gov. BrooksNo. 1 One, Gen'l JacksonNo. 2. We have now in the service of the city an organization bearing the name of Washington Hook and Ladder Company which has been in existence for seventy-two years without interruption. From time to
One, Gen'l JacksonNo. 2. We have now in the service of the city an organization bearing the name of Washington Hook and Ladder Company which has been in existence for seventy-two years without interruption. From time to time this has been composed of many of our best and most influential citizens, who were imbued with the same sympathetic spirit that characterized the members of the former organization. They were organized under an act of the General Court of Massachusetts in the year 1828, by a charter duly signed by the Hon. Levi Lincoln as Governor, and Edward D. Bangs as Secretary of State. So far as I have been able to learn, this is the only Fire Company now holding a charter designating them a Company of Hook and Ladder Men. At the time of their organization there were two companies of firemen in the city of Philadelphia, called The Northern Liberty and The Hibernian Engine Company, who were organized with a charter signed by King George of England in 1750 and 1752, but
hosen by ballot. The Captain to preside as Moderator, and have power to call special meetings when he shall think proper. The Clerk to preside at any meeting in the absence of the Captain. Article 2. The business of the Clerk shall be to keep a true account of all fines due, and all other necessary records. Article 3. The business of the company shall be determined by a majority of the members present. Article 4. There shall be four quarterly meetings, viz.: on the third Mondays of January, April, July, and October at the ladder house, unless otherwise ordered by the company, at 4 o'clock P. M., at which time the roll shall be called, and absent members shall pay, if absent at roll call, twenty-five cents, and if absent during the continuance of the meeting, fifty cents. Article 5. At special meetings every member shall be warned by the Clerk, and if any one is absent, he shall pay the same fine as at quarterly meetings, and a proportionate part of the expen
ted. That every person entering the company shall pay to the Clerk two dollars to be appropriated to defray the expenses of the company. Attest George W. Porter, Clerk. The first fire on record occurred Thursday, March 13, 1834, at Thatcher Magoun's shipyard; the second, Dec. 30, 1834, on Andrew Blanchard's lumber wharf. These same rules and regulations have been in existence, and were rigidly adhered to by the present company until the department was made a permanent one. In 1839 the town of Medford petitioned the Legislature for an act of incorporation for their fire department. This suggested to the Legislature the importance of considering the whole subject; and on the 9th of April the present law was passed. The next day they authorized the town of Medford to organize a fire department according to their petition, and the act is as follows: An act to establish a Fire Department in the town of Medford. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representative
screw keys, for which fines were levied and paid. If a member was absent at the first call of the roll he was fined twelve and one-half cents; if absent from the meeting he was fined fifty cents. The fines thus collected enabled them to have occasionally a collation or chowder after the meeting. This was the first organization of which we have any knowledge formed for the purpose of assisting each other to extinguish fires in those early days. They continued their existence till the year 1849, when the society was dissolved. There are now hanging in the carriage room of the hook and ladder house twenty-two of these leathern buckets, inscribed with the name of the owner and the year of his membership, which the present company prize as relics of auld lang syne. Mr. Francis A. Wait has hanging in the front hall of his house three buckets inscribed as follows: One, John A. Fulton1785. Two, Nathan Wait1810. The following are those in the hook and ladder carriage room: T
o A. Smith, John Stimson, Eph'm Tufts, Jos. P. Hall, B. Richardson, T. R. Peck, Ebenz'r Chamberlain, Dexter Harlow, Elisha Livermore, Azor Richardson, and Thomas Jameson. At the first meeting of the company, July 8, 1829, they organized by the choice of John B. Fitch as moderator and George W. Porter as clerk, and then voted to adopt the following Constitution as a form of government: Constitution of the Hook and Ladder Company of Medford, instituted July 8, 1829. Article 1. On the third Monday of October there shall be an annual meeting of the company, at which time there shall be a Captain and Clerk, chosen by ballot. The Captain to preside as Moderator, and have power to call special meetings when he shall think proper. The Clerk to preside at any meeting in the absence of the Captain. Article 2. The business of the Clerk shall be to keep a true account of all fines due, and all other necessary records. Article 3. The business of the company shall be determi
Chamberlain (search for this): chapter 2
tes, of which fact the city of Medford may justly be proud. By their records I learn that at a meeting of the Selectmen of the town of Medford July 26, 1829, the following persons were appointed to form and constitute a Company of Hook and Ladder Men, agreeable to an act of the General Court for that purpose, passed June 11, 1829, viz.: John B. Fitch, N. H. Bishop, A. S. Kent, George W. Porter, Horatio A. Smith, John Stimson, Eph'm Tufts, Jos. P. Hall, B. Richardson, T. R. Peck, Ebenz'r Chamberlain, Dexter Harlow, Elisha Livermore, Azor Richardson, and Thomas Jameson. At the first meeting of the company, July 8, 1829, they organized by the choice of John B. Fitch as moderator and George W. Porter as clerk, and then voted to adopt the following Constitution as a form of government: Constitution of the Hook and Ladder Company of Medford, instituted July 8, 1829. Article 1. On the third Monday of October there shall be an annual meeting of the company, at which time there sha
3. From the early records of the Hook and Ladder Company, and from books in their possession, I learn that in the year 1785 an association was formed bearing the name of the Amicable Fire Society, and having for its motto Amicis Nobisque. By Con Mr. Francis A. Wait has hanging in the front hall of his house three buckets inscribed as follows: One, John A. Fulton1785. Two, Nathan Wait1810. The following are those in the hook and ladder carriage room: Two, J. Swan1785. Two, Ebene1785. Two, Ebenezer Hall1785. Two, Benjamin Fisk1800. One, Daniel Swan1821. Two, Robert Bacon1822. Two, Thomas R. Peck1827. Two, Abnah Bartlettno date. One, E. Hallno date. One, Daniel Lawrence1841. One, Timothy Cottingno date. One, Samuel Chaseno date. 1785. Two, Benjamin Fisk1800. One, Daniel Swan1821. Two, Robert Bacon1822. Two, Thomas R. Peck1827. Two, Abnah Bartlettno date. One, E. Hallno date. One, Daniel Lawrence1841. One, Timothy Cottingno date. One, Samuel Chaseno date. Two, Andrew Blanchard, Columbian Eagle Fire Society. One, Nathan Sawyerno date. One, Gov. BrooksNo. 1 One, Gen'l JacksonNo. 2. We have now in the service of the city an organization bearing the name of Washington Hook and Ladder Company
Cottingno date. One, Samuel Chaseno date. Two, Andrew Blanchard, Columbian Eagle Fire Society. One, Nathan Sawyerno date. One, Gov. BrooksNo. 1 One, Gen'l JacksonNo. 2. We have now in the service of the city an organization bearing the name of Washington Hook and Ladder Company which has been in existence for seventynd accordingly the present fire department was organized in due form. There were three engine companies formed under this act, viz.: Governor Brooks No. 1, General Jackson No 2, and J. Q: Adams No. 4. The Governor Brooks No. 1 was located where the public pound now is on Back street. The Selectmen appointed a company consistihe engineers they were disbanded for disobeying the order of the engineers at a fire on the plains, Mr. Hugh Nugent's house on Cherry street. Engine No. 2, General Jackson, was first located in a building near the Meeting-House brook at the foot of Marm Symond's hill, and after a few years was relocated in the rear of the First
J. Q. Adams (search for this): chapter 2
rnelius Bigelow, Abial Butters, Henry Woodwarth, James T. Floyd Jr., Benjamin Floyd 2d, John M. Kuhn, Oliver Wyman, William E. Otis, Marshal Symmes, Sewall Pierce, Thomas Calf, Edward Hudley. Thus it seems that the Selectmen, with the approval of the engineers, appointed new men every year or two which was in accordance with the act of the General Court. This company voted to disband on the twenty-second day of December, 1859, and so notified the Board of Engineers. Engine No. 4, J. Q. Adams, was located at the Ship Yard nearly opposite Park street, and having no suction hose was used for the watering of ships in course of construction. Engine No. 3, Washington, was organized in 1855, and at a subsequent meeting the following officers were elected: Joseph W. Mitchell, foreman; Jonathan Oldham, first assistant foreman; Almon Black, second assistant foreman; Samuel N. Sylvester, clerk; and Hiram Simmons, steward. They continued their organization till the year 1868. This
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