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of our cause, as the only service I was permitted to render; rather feeble service, indeed, but hotly sincere. Phillips Brooks, at home from his first Philadelphia parish for a vacation visit in Boston, sat in a pew in our church on one of the Sundays, and privately criticized the sermon as bloodthirsty. The Episcopal, or, as it is sometimes called, the English Church, was at that period rather conservative in its pulpit utterances relating to the leading questions of the day, but Mr. Stront the head of the school in the processionals. At Whitsunday, 1878, the superintendent's report read as follows: School commenced May 27, 1877, continued to June 24, inclusive; resumed September 9, continued up to June 2, inclusive, forty-three Sundays. Whole number that have been in the Sunday-school duringthe year, eighty-two; whole number of persons acting as teachers during the year , fifteen. At present, 1901, there are on the books of the Sunday-school the names of one hundred and two
n Danvers. He entered Harvard College in 1854; was a member of the Institute Society, the Hasty Pudding Club and the Phi Beta Kappa; formed the Harvard Glee Club, and was its first leader; graduated in 1858; entered the Andover Theological Seminary in 1859; became rector of Grace Church, Medford, in 1863. October 14, married Susan Ellen Perley of Danvers. On the sixth of September, 1865, Mr. Learoyd went to Europe, and the Rev. C. Ingalls Chapin acted as supply until his return on the twenty-third of the following September. In 1867 the parish entered upon the work of building a new church, and the sum of fifteen thousand dollars was subscribed for the purpose; but subsequently the undertaking was assumed by the family of the late Gorham Brooks, Esq. The amount subscribed by the parish was placed in the hands of the Trustees of Donations as a permanent fund. The corner stone of the church was laid September 17, 1867, by the Rev. Mr. Learoyd, when an address was delivered by th
to remind us of the many trying scenes through which we had so recently passed. After a march through several of the principal streets to West Medford, where a collation was furnished by the citizens of that part of the town, the company returned to the square, where they were entertained by the Lawrence Rifles at their armory in Usher's Building. The town gave the Light Guard a reception on June 14, and another was given by Washington Engine Co., No. 3, at Green Mountain Grove on the twenty-eighth. See Usher's History of Medford. These were days of rejoicing, but the booming of cannon, the huzzas, and the music only drowned the sounds of weeping for dear ones who had gone away with the company, but whose places were vacant now, who slept on Southern battlefields or who had died in foul prison pens. Many in the ranks were but shadows of their former selves, some had been left behind in the hospitals, others had come home to die. The first duty of the Light Guard was to bri
on Saturday, April 27. They were mustered into the Federal service, May 1, 1861. The regiment remained on guard in the treasury building until May 25, the morning after Ellsworth was killed at Alexandria, when it was ordered to that town. The first month of service was hardly more than a long holiday. The Light Guard made friends among the people of Washington, had plenty to eat (the Light Guard always has appreciated that blessing, at home and abroad), and had little hard work, but the chThe bodies of Samuel W. Joyce, George Henry Champlin and George H. Lewis were sent home through the personal supervision of Capt. Hutchins, who was called South to testify in the trial of the commander of Salisbury Prison. (To be concluded in January number.) The town House. THE lot now occupied by City Hall was bought of the heirs of Samuel Buel, May 22, 1833. The cost was $3,000. The committee in charge of negotiations were Isaac Sprague, Daniel Lawrence and Elisha Stetson. The tow
January 4th (search for this): chapter 4
oo early, as we think, he has passed from this earthly scene which needs such to forward its highest welfare. Henry C. Delong. Lorin L. Dame. William Cushing Wait. February 17, 1902. Society Notes. The miniature poster at the head of Mr. Hollis' paper on Grace Church is a reproduction of the first call for a meeting of the Episcopalians in Medford. The Saturday Evening Course of the society has proved very interesting, and good-sized audiences have greeted the speakers. Mr. F. M. Hawes of Somerville spoke on the Lyric Poetry of the Revolution on January 4, and was assisted by a double quartet, which added much to the interest in Mr. Hawes' remarks. Mr. Rosewell B. Lawrence explained The Relation of Medford to the Metropolitan Park System on February 1. He gave a most comprehensive sketch of the inception and development of the Metropolitan Park System in the vicinity of Boston, March 1. Mr. David H. Brown surprised his hearers with a most interesting talk on Genealogy.
January 19th (search for this): chapter 8
Medford Historical Society, Seventh year, 1902-1903. October 20.—Time-keeping in a Medford Home two hundred Years Ago. Mr. John Albree, Jr., Swampscott, and Social Meeting. November 17.—Medford in 1847. Mr. Charles Cummings. December 15.—The Middlesex Canal. (Illustrated.) Mr. Moses W. Mann. January 19.—The Environment and Tendencies of Colonial Life. (Illustrated.) Rev. George M. Bodge of Westwood. February 16.—The Baptist Church of Medford. Mrs. Amanda H. Plummer. March 16.—Annual Meeting. April 20.—Rev. John Pierpont: His Life and Work. Rev. Henry C. DeLong. May 18.—The 39th Massachusetts Regiment in the Civil War. Hon. C. H. Porter of Quincy. Committee on Papers and Addresses. David H. Brown. Walter H. Cushing. Charles H. Morss. John H. Hooper. William Cushing Wait. Miss A
January 24th (search for this): chapter 1
ensuing, and the other half to be paid in at or before the first day of July following. An assessment be forthwith made and committed to the constable and collector. Voted in the affirmative. At a legal Town Meeting by adjournment from Monday Jan. 24th to Monday Jan. 31, 1725-6. At said meeting the abovesaid committee did make report. [Referring to item in records of meeting Jan. 24] to the town that it was their mind it would be proper for this town to build a meeting house 52 feet longJan. 24] to the town that it was their mind it would be proper for this town to build a meeting house 52 feet long and thirty-eight feet wide, and thirty-three feet the posts according to the committee's report. At said meeting put to vote whether the town will build a meeting-house of the dimensions abovesaid. Voted in the affirmative. March 7th 1725-6. At said meeting put to vote whether the town would have a steeple built to the new meeting house. Voted in the affirmative. At a Town Meeting August 24, 1727 . . . Put to vote whether the town will meet in the new meeting-house the Sabbath day
Hedge, the Hallowells, Frank B. Sanborn, James J. Myers, present Speaker of the Massachusetts House of Representatives, and many other notable persons were frequent partakers of her hospitality, and knew the refined attractions of her home, which kept her husband's heart constantly there, wherever his onerous public duties might call him, for she was a perfect housekeeper, and worshipper of art in all its branches. The radiance of the azaleas in her conservatory in the snow-bound days of February, due to her personal care, is far famed. One of the best pictures of her shows her seated in this bower. Tuskegee, Hampton, Berea and Calhoun, the colleges devoted to the education of colored students, are indebted to Mrs. Stearns for most liberal yearly contributions of pecuniary aid from the start, nor have her private benefactions been less liberal and judicious. Tufts College and the Boston Homoeopathic Hospital are handsomely remembered in her will, and this Society is the resid
February 1st (search for this): chapter 4
too early, as we think, he has passed from this earthly scene which needs such to forward its highest welfare. Henry C. Delong. Lorin L. Dame. William Cushing Wait. February 17, 1902. Society Notes. The miniature poster at the head of Mr. Hollis' paper on Grace Church is a reproduction of the first call for a meeting of the Episcopalians in Medford. The Saturday Evening Course of the society has proved very interesting, and good-sized audiences have greeted the speakers. Mr. F. M. Hawes of Somerville spoke on the Lyric Poetry of the Revolution on January 4, and was assisted by a double quartet, which added much to the interest in Mr. Hawes' remarks. Mr. Rosewell B. Lawrence explained The Relation of Medford to the Metropolitan Park System on February 1. He gave a most comprehensive sketch of the inception and development of the Metropolitan Park System in the vicinity of Boston, March 1. Mr. David H. Brown surprised his hearers with a most interesting talk on Genealogy.
February 2nd (search for this): chapter 4
was not only a tireless and indefatigable worker in his special line, but inspired others with courage to undertake and carry out important historical investigation. Resolved, That this society extends its sympathy to his family in its bereavement, and that a copy of these resolutions be sent them and to the Medford papers for publication. David H. Brown. John H. Hooper will C. Eddy. February 17, 1902. James W. Tufts. In the death of Mr. James W. Tufts at Pinehurst, N. C., February 2, the Historical Society, together with Medford and Boston, has lost a man whose departure will be deeply mourned. His quiet and reserve may have kept him from the wide acquaintance he deserved, but those who knew his worth of character and the modest goodness of his life sorrow that they will see his face no more. Mr. Tufts' active life in affairs began in Somerville, but early he came to Medford, where he continued as a druggist until he entered upon the larger business which, by his
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