hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
John Pierpont 34 4 Browse Search
John Albree 23 1 Browse Search
January 30th, 1791 AD 22 22 Browse Search
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) 21 1 Browse Search
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 20 0 Browse Search
John Dame 18 0 Browse Search
Stoneham (Massachusetts, United States) 18 0 Browse Search
James Pierpont 18 2 Browse Search
James M. G. Plummer 15 7 Browse Search
Charles Brooks 14 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 6.. Search the whole document.

Found 515 total hits in 284 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
phoid fever. His body was sent home and buried with military honors. Private Priggin went home about that time on account of sickness. In February there were more ill than at any time during the term of enlistment. The arrival of new tents, letters from home, which had been delayed, and certain news that they were to be mustered out, were good medicine for invalids. March 3, 1899, one of the Light Guard wrote home, The fashion of dying has ceased to be, and all are on the mend. On the 31st the 5th was mustered out at Greenville, but the men came home in a body and passed in review before Gov. Wolcott at the State House. Capt. Clark brought back to Medford his whole company, except Sergt. Gray, who was recovering from typhoid fever, and his brother, who stayed behind as nurse and companion. In the state which was the hot-bed of secession, these Massachusetts troops did their part to heal old wounds, especially when they stood guard at a Confederate monument, ready to die,
Fanny Russell Leary. Mrs. Fanny Russell Leary died November 24, 1902, at her temporary home in Hartford, Ct. She was born in South Hadley, August 16, 1838, and was a descendant of Rev. John Russell, one of the earliest settlers of that town. In her death we realize the loss of a patriotic, loyal-hearted woman, who was interested in the past and present of Medford. Almost from its beginning she was one of the most devoted members of the Medford Historical Society. Notes. At the January meeting of the society, Hon. C. H. Porter, of Quincy, gave an address, entitled The 39th Massachusetts Regiment in the Civil War. From personal observation, careful study of official reports and the writings of various commanders, he was able to give his hearers a vivid account of the movements of the regiment from the time of its organization until the victory before Richmond. The Saturday evening course of lectures for 1903 offers an attractive set of topics. Last month Mr. Walter
January 3rd (search for this): chapter 1
Saturday evening course of lectures for 1903 offers an attractive set of topics. Last month Mr. Walter C. Wright read a paper on the Gypsy Moth: Past, Present and Future, describing the habits of the pest and the most effective way of ridding the city of its ravages. He placed great responsibility on individual occupants of real estate, who might, by conscientious work, keep the moth in check on private property, while the State and City could be fully occupied in taking care of the trees in reservations, parks and highways. The following papers will be given during the winter and spring:— January 3.—Some Evils of our present Nominating System, and how they can be removed. Hon. F. W. Dallinger, of Cambridge. February 7.—Matthew Cradock. Mr. W. K. Watkins, of Malden. March 7.—How can we make Medford more beautiful? Mr. Edward P. Adams. April 4.—The Second Charter of Massachusetts. Mr. Walter H. Cushing. May 2.—Spot Pond, as it was and is. Mr. Herbert
rubber blankets, like a tattoo on a snare drum, weather so cold that it froze the ears of men on guard, mud and the heaviest snow that had been known in that section for years, made the boys understand that campaigning was no pastime. Sickness developed in the camp and blues were the order of the day. In December, Wagoner Kiley, of Co. E, died of typhoid fever. His body was sent home and buried with military honors. Private Priggin went home about that time on account of sickness. In February there were more ill than at any time during the term of enlistment. The arrival of new tents, letters from home, which had been delayed, and certain news that they were to be mustered out, were good medicine for invalids. March 3, 1899, one of the Light Guard wrote home, The fashion of dying has ceased to be, and all are on the mend. On the 31st the 5th was mustered out at Greenville, but the men came home in a body and passed in review before Gov. Wolcott at the State House. Capt.
February 7th (search for this): chapter 1
Saturday evening course of lectures for 1903 offers an attractive set of topics. Last month Mr. Walter C. Wright read a paper on the Gypsy Moth: Past, Present and Future, describing the habits of the pest and the most effective way of ridding the city of its ravages. He placed great responsibility on individual occupants of real estate, who might, by conscientious work, keep the moth in check on private property, while the State and City could be fully occupied in taking care of the trees in reservations, parks and highways. The following papers will be given during the winter and spring:— January 3.—Some Evils of our present Nominating System, and how they can be removed. Hon. F. W. Dallinger, of Cambridge. February 7.—Matthew Cradock. Mr. W. K. Watkins, of Malden. March 7.—How can we make Medford more beautiful? Mr. Edward P. Adams. April 4.—The Second Charter of Massachusetts. Mr. Walter H. Cushing. May 2.—Spot Pond, as it was and is. Mr. Herbert
March 7th (search for this): chapter 1
Saturday evening course of lectures for 1903 offers an attractive set of topics. Last month Mr. Walter C. Wright read a paper on the Gypsy Moth: Past, Present and Future, describing the habits of the pest and the most effective way of ridding the city of its ravages. He placed great responsibility on individual occupants of real estate, who might, by conscientious work, keep the moth in check on private property, while the State and City could be fully occupied in taking care of the trees in reservations, parks and highways. The following papers will be given during the winter and spring:— January 3.—Some Evils of our present Nominating System, and how they can be removed. Hon. F. W. Dallinger, of Cambridge. February 7.—Matthew Cradock. Mr. W. K. Watkins, of Malden. March 7.—How can we make Medford more beautiful? Mr. Edward P. Adams. April 4.—The Second Charter of Massachusetts. Mr. Walter H. Cushing. May 2.—Spot Pond, as it was and is. Mr. Herbert
April 4th (search for this): chapter 1
Saturday evening course of lectures for 1903 offers an attractive set of topics. Last month Mr. Walter C. Wright read a paper on the Gypsy Moth: Past, Present and Future, describing the habits of the pest and the most effective way of ridding the city of its ravages. He placed great responsibility on individual occupants of real estate, who might, by conscientious work, keep the moth in check on private property, while the State and City could be fully occupied in taking care of the trees in reservations, parks and highways. The following papers will be given during the winter and spring:— January 3.—Some Evils of our present Nominating System, and how they can be removed. Hon. F. W. Dallinger, of Cambridge. February 7.—Matthew Cradock. Mr. W. K. Watkins, of Malden. March 7.—How can we make Medford more beautiful? Mr. Edward P. Adams. April 4.—The Second Charter of Massachusetts. Mr. Walter H. Cushing. May 2.—Spot Pond, as it was and is. Mr. Herbert
April 19th (search for this): chapter 1
Regiment, and the Ambulance Corps. December 9, 1897, Capt. James C. D. Clark was elected captain. The company was in good condition, many of its members being former officers of the High School Cadets. In less than two months after Capt. Clark's commission, a war cloud overhung the sky, and orders were given for each man to provide himself with clothing and equipments ready for instant duty, should war be declared. For the third time in the history of the United States, the nineteenth of April brought a call to arms. Again the drums beat for recruits at the High street armory, and those who had heard it nearly forty years before felt like stopping their ears and fleeing from the sound, but the boys, sons and grandsons of the men of ‘61, were full of the same excitement as in the days of the Civil War. Ninety-two names were enrolled in one week. April 29, came the disappointing news that the 5th was not needed, but on May 24, the regiment was ordered to Gloucester for an
April 29th (search for this): chapter 1
ts ready for instant duty, should war be declared. For the third time in the history of the United States, the nineteenth of April brought a call to arms. Again the drums beat for recruits at the High street armory, and those who had heard it nearly forty years before felt like stopping their ears and fleeing from the sound, but the boys, sons and grandsons of the men of ‘61, were full of the same excitement as in the days of the Civil War. Ninety-two names were enrolled in one week. April 29, came the disappointing news that the 5th was not needed, but on May 24, the regiment was ordered to Gloucester for an eight days tour of duty. As it was not at all certain that the boys would be ordered back to Medford at its close, they were escorted to the cars by the citizens, High School Cadets, and Fire Department. The week was no play-time, for the weather was wet and stormy, and the regiment was exercised in war-time drills. A sharp but unrewarded watch was kept for the Spanish f
Saturday evening course of lectures for 1903 offers an attractive set of topics. Last month Mr. Walter C. Wright read a paper on the Gypsy Moth: Past, Present and Future, describing the habits of the pest and the most effective way of ridding the city of its ravages. He placed great responsibility on individual occupants of real estate, who might, by conscientious work, keep the moth in check on private property, while the State and City could be fully occupied in taking care of the trees in reservations, parks and highways. The following papers will be given during the winter and spring:— January 3.—Some Evils of our present Nominating System, and how they can be removed. Hon. F. W. Dallinger, of Cambridge. February 7.—Matthew Cradock. Mr. W. K. Watkins, of Malden. March 7.—How can we make Medford more beautiful? Mr. Edward P. Adams. April 4.—The Second Charter of Massachusetts. Mr. Walter H. Cushing. May 2.—Spot Pond, as it was and is. Mr. Herbert
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...