hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
John Pierpont 34 4 Browse Search
John Albree 23 1 Browse Search
January 30th, 1791 AD 22 22 Browse Search
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) 21 1 Browse Search
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 20 0 Browse Search
John Dame 18 0 Browse Search
Stoneham (Massachusetts, United States) 18 0 Browse Search
James Pierpont 18 2 Browse Search
James M. G. Plummer 15 7 Browse Search
Charles Brooks 14 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 6.. Search the whole document.

Found 515 total hits in 284 results.

... 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29
an enter and ransack the homes of that time. One of childhood's delights is to rummage in the grandparents' garret, but this garret disappears with advancing years. For us the searching of ancestors' inventories must take its place, for in those lists we can know to the last glass bottle everything there was in their homes. Let us see what we can find for timepieces. If time-pieces existed at all, they must surely have been found in the homes of the best citizens. The men of Medford in 1728, by their own official acts, determined for us who twenty-five of the best citizens were, and the list is found in Brooks' History of Medford (page 334). Who of us would dare to serve on a committee to nominate the twenty-five men in our respective churches who are entitled to have the first choice of seats? What heart burnings must have been caused by that custom. It is a wonder it continued so long. Of this list of twenty-five, there are on file inventories of the contents of the homes o
Saturday evening course of lectures for 1903 offers an attractive set of topics. Last month Mr. Walter C. Wright read a paper on the Gypsy Moth: Past, Present and Future, describing the habits of the pest and the most effective way of ridding the city of its ravages. He placed great responsibility on individual occupants of real estate, who might, by conscientious work, keep the moth in check on private property, while the State and City could be fully occupied in taking care of the trees in reservations, parks and highways. The following papers will be given during the winter and spring:— January 3.—Some Evils of our present Nominating System, and how they can be removed. Hon. F. W. Dallinger, of Cambridge. February 7.—Matthew Cradock. Mr. W. K. Watkins, of Malden. March 7.—How can we make Medford more beautiful? Mr. Edward P. Adams. April 4.—The Second Charter of Massachusetts. Mr. Walter H. Cushing. May 2.—Spot Pond, as it was and is. Mr. Herbert
September 12th (search for this): chapter 1
tting. At Park street, police and fire departments were needed to clear the tracks as the train pulled slowly down. The band played The Girl I Left Behind Me as the boys boarded the cars, and as they threw themselves into their seats, there were many set faces among them, for they knew not when they would see Medford again. To the strains of Auld Lang Syne, the train moved out. The regiment remained at South Framingham until September, and put in hard work at drilling and camp duty. September 12 found our boys marching through coal dust to Camp Meade, on the banks of the Susquehanna. The camp was in a beautiful situation on a side hill sloping down to the river. Although in a malarial district, the men were, thanks to careful policing, kept in good health. Every other day the regiment was marched to the river for bathing, until a swimming pool was constructed nearer the camp. The splendid physical condition of the command before it left Massachusetts was in its favor. What
September 6th (search for this): chapter 1
consolidated company was organized May 5, 1874. Lieut. Dorr resigned the following September, and J. H. Whitney and Charles M. Green were commissioned 1st and 2d lieutenants. Capt. Manning resigned in 1876, and J. H. Whitney became captain. Rifle practice was inaugurated during his term of service. Through a combination of circumstances, the interest in the State militia began to wane about 1880, and the Light Guard suffered with the whole. In 1881, it is recorded under the date of September 6, the celebrated yellow day, that eight men and one officer answered roll call and started for muster. The largest company in the regiment mustered only twenty-eight men on the opening day. On the following Wednesday, orders came from headquarters that each company must have at least thirty men or be broken. Sergt. Porter was sent home and came back at midnight with fifteen men; ten more came in the morning, and the company was saved. Almost immediately after this muster, the company w
August, 1902 AD (search for this): chapter 1
bove the Winthrop Note.—Old Clocks and Watches and their Makers by F. J. Britten (London, 1899) is valuable for facts concerning the general subject of time-pieces, while the results of the exhaustive researches of Dr. Irving Lyon, given in his Colonial Furniture (Boston, 1890, now unfortunately out of print), should be studied by those desiring to learn the state of the art in the Colonies. As to hall clocks, consult in addition Notes on Long Case Clocks, in Studio Magazine (London), August, 1902, by Britten.—J. A. Jr. Street bridge, then not in existence. His home was at the corner of South street and Maple avenue, and until a few years ago was occupied by his daughter. Mr. Peter Lewis built a small vessel on the north bank of the river, just east of the Lowell Railroad bridge. Another was built at the wharf where the new armory stands. The hulls of vessels of a thousand tons burden have been built west of the bridge, which was twice widened to accommodate larger craft.
October 19th, 1902 AD (search for this): chapter 1
the Lawrence Light Guard is looking toward the fiftieth anniversary of its establishment in Medford with the brightest prospects, determined to be worthy of the benefits which the colonel of the Minutemen of '61 has showered upon them, worthy of the respect of this city and the State, and at all times ready to honor, defend, and follow the oldest flag in the world, Old Glory. The tradition of the old weaver's clock. by John Albree, Jr. [Read before the Medford Historical Society, October 19, 1902.] HOWEVER interesting the old weaver's clock may be as an antique, its true worth is in its serving as a means to reveal to us the men who lived in this town and who used it. Can we assume that if the grandparents, and aunts, and uncles, and cousins galore, whose names are on the slate stones across the street, were to troop in here tonight, we could meet with them on common ground in speaking of a clock, or a watch, or of time itself? There is no question that Gov. Brooks would mar
November 13th, 1749 AD (search for this): chapter 1
April 13, 1681. He had seven children, and died in Charlestown, on the Blanchard Farm, October 24, 1694, aged 40. His gravestone is in the Medford burying ground. IV. Aaron Blanchard, twin son of Joseph and Hannah (Shepard), was born March 4, 1690; married Sarah——; had twelve children; died at Medford, September 30, 1769 (?) V. Aaron Blanchard, Jr., son of Aaron and Sarah ——, was born in Medford, May 21, 1722; married, 1st, Rebecca Hall of Medford, November 13, 1745. She died November 13, 1749. He married, 2d, Tabitha Floyd, who was born March, 1729, and died July 31, 1775. His third wife was Rebecca Tufts, widow of Ichabod, and daughter of Samuel Francis of Medford; they were married November 14, 1776. She died in Medford, January 28, 1817. He died in Medford, January 7, 1787. He was the father of fourteen children. He was a periwig-maker and was generally referred to in Medford as Barber Blanchard. Benjamin Crandon Leonard. Benjamin Crandon Leonard was born
February 16th, 1844 AD (search for this): chapter 1
d, 2d, Tabitha Floyd, who was born March, 1729, and died July 31, 1775. His third wife was Rebecca Tufts, widow of Ichabod, and daughter of Samuel Francis of Medford; they were married November 14, 1776. She died in Medford, January 28, 1817. He died in Medford, January 7, 1787. He was the father of fourteen children. He was a periwig-maker and was generally referred to in Medford as Barber Blanchard. Benjamin Crandon Leonard. Benjamin Crandon Leonard was born in Plymouth, February 16, 1844. He was a son of Joseph Nelson and Abbie Bishop (Crandon) Leonard, and was a lineal descendant of John Howland and Richard Warren of the Mayflower. At the age of eighteen he obtained employment with the American Bank Note Co. of Boston, and remained with them the rest of his life. In 1879 he was appointed manager. He came to West Medford in 1872, and for thirty years was very active in local matters and town affairs. He was deeply interested in the organization and support of th
use was built. He used the brook for power for his mill. It seems probable that Rural avenue was a road to his house. His grandson told how the road used to be blocked with snow in the winter. There his children and his son's children were born. The story of the clock Brooks received from his mother, who was Elizabeth Albree, daughter of John Albree. She received the clock in the division of the estate of her father, Joseph Albree, in 1777. At the same time, her brother, John Albree (1757-1842), received a silver spoon marked with the initials of the original John Albree and his wife: I. A. E. Each of these heirlooms has come down, and each has its particular injunction associated with it; that with the clock being that it shall always remain in the female line, and that with the spoon, that it shall always pass to the oldest son. The fact of these parallel heirlooms suggests that they have a common origin, which is readily seen to have been when the property of John Albree's
ere his children and his son's children were born. The story of the clock Brooks received from his mother, who was Elizabeth Albree, daughter of John Albree. She received the clock in the division of the estate of her father, Joseph Albree, in 1777. At the same time, her brother, John Albree (1757-1842), received a silver spoon marked with the initials of the original John Albree and his wife: I. A. E. Each of these heirlooms has come down, and each has its particular injunction associated line, and that with the spoon, that it shall always pass to the oldest son. The fact of these parallel heirlooms suggests that they have a common origin, which is readily seen to have been when the property of John Albree's only son was divided in 1777. Furthermore, that these were thus created heirlooms shows that they were then regarded as valuable relics of John Albree, the weaver, and as the date of the son's death was less than twenty years after that of the weaver, we find the traditions
... 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29