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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 6.. Search the whole document.

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May 21st, 1722 AD (search for this): chapter 1
wife, was born in 1654; married Hannah, daughter of Thomas Shepard of Charlestown, April 13, 1681. He had seven children, and died in Charlestown, on the Blanchard Farm, October 24, 1694, aged 40. His gravestone is in the Medford burying ground. IV. Aaron Blanchard, twin son of Joseph and Hannah (Shepard), was born March 4, 1690; married Sarah——; had twelve children; died at Medford, September 30, 1769 (?) V. Aaron Blanchard, Jr., son of Aaron and Sarah ——, was born in Medford, May 21, 1722; married, 1st, Rebecca Hall of Medford, November 13, 1745. She died November 13, 1749. He married, 2d, Tabitha Floyd, who was born March, 1729, and died July 31, 1775. His third wife was Rebecca Tufts, widow of Ichabod, and daughter of Samuel Francis of Medford; they were married November 14, 1776. She died in Medford, January 28, 1817. He died in Medford, January 7, 1787. He was the father of fourteen children. He was a periwig-maker and was generally referred to in Medford as Ba
ildren comprised the family. Richard Tufts' wheelwright shop was in the rear. They afterward lived at the corner of Salem and Fulton streets. Opposite the Gregg estate, on the east side of Main street, next to the river, was the blacksmith shop of Nathan W. Wait, which, strangely enough, was about the only building in the neighborhood which was not consumed on the memorable night of November 2, 1850. Mr. Wait succeeded his father, Nathan Wait, who started the business on the same spot in 1783. The property remained in the family until taken by the Metropolitan Park Commission, in 1901. Mr. Wait's dwelling house was next south of his shop. He went into it in 1826. After it was burned, he built the house now standing on the site. The next building was occupied by William S. Barker grocer, and Leonard Johnson, dealer in grain and meal on the lower floor. James Hyde, painter, occupied the second floor. There were two long oat troughs at the side of the street for feeding h
September 2nd, 1701 AD (search for this): chapter 1
went to the plundered home and found a clock, which he brought to the ship; so, with the sister in one hand, and the clock in the other, John Albree, at the age of twelve, began life in Medford, and the tradition is that this is the clock. An investigation into this tradition will give us an insight into the Medford homes of two centuries ago. Brooks, in his history, used about all the existing material concerning John Albree. The first record of him is in a list of those assessed September 2, 1701, on a country rate, the amount being three shillings. His name appears on the lists each succeeding year. In 1711, he married Elizabeth Green, who was daughter of Samuel Green (John 2, Percival 1), and his wife, Elizabeth Sill, who was daughter of Joseph Sill and his wife, Jemima Belcher, the latter being the daughter of Andrew Belcher and Elizabeth Danforth. He bought first the property afterwards known as the Thatcher Magoun estate, on the banks of the Mystic, and later, selling it
h winds which blew down the tents and upset the smoke stacks of the Sibley stoves, drenching rains which went through the tents as if they were paper, sounding, as the drops fell on the rubber blankets, like a tattoo on a snare drum, weather so cold that it froze the ears of men on guard, mud and the heaviest snow that had been known in that section for years, made the boys understand that campaigning was no pastime. Sickness developed in the camp and blues were the order of the day. In December, Wagoner Kiley, of Co. E, died of typhoid fever. His body was sent home and buried with military honors. Private Priggin went home about that time on account of sickness. In February there were more ill than at any time during the term of enlistment. The arrival of new tents, letters from home, which had been delayed, and certain news that they were to be mustered out, were good medicine for invalids. March 3, 1899, one of the Light Guard wrote home, The fashion of dying has ceased to
's clock is the quarter of an hour, and furthermore, it never had but one hand, and that the hour hand. What sort of a mess would the men of today make of their work if but five only out of one hundred possessed time-pieces, and these with the hour hand only? The witchcraft trials of Salem, 1692, furnish much evidence as to the temporary use of words of timemeas-urement. They referred to three fixed times; sunrise, noon, and sunset. Parris, the minister at Salem village, notes that on November i, 1691, he called a meeting, For tomorrow an hour and a half before sundown. The entry the next day is, After sunset about seventeen of the brethren met. Owing to the indefiniteness of time, some of these brethren must have wasted at least an hour and a half. Yet their needs seem to have been satisfied. Each house was sufficient to itself, for it had its water, its fuel, its lights, its stocks of food in the cellar, and a snow storm that to us would be a calamity was to them an inconv
May, 1866 AD (search for this): chapter 1
ciety, May 19, 1902.] AS soon as Co. C, 39th Regiment, was dismissed from the United States service, in June, 1865, the members renewed their old associations with the Lawrence Light Guard and resumed regular meetings in the Town Hall the following October. It was suggested that the company join the Lawrence Rifles, but the Light Guard positively refused to do so, and chose the following officers: Capt., I. F. R. Hosea; 1st Lieut., J. Henry Eames; 2d Lieut., Henry A. Ireland, Jr. In May, 1866, the 5th Regiment was inspected at the race course (Mystic Park). Co. E had three officers, fifty-seven men, and fifty-five guns. Fully two-thirds of the company were veterans; about thirty had served with the three years men. In June, 1866, the company began to fit up rooms in Usher's Building. The drill hall was shared with the Lawrence Rifles. At this time, when the Light Guard is about to take possession of an elegant building, a few items of the simple furnishings of the armory o
May 19, 1902.] AS soon as Co. C, 39th Regiment, was dismissed from the United States service, in June, 1865, the members renewed their old associations with the Lawrence Light Guard and resumed regular meetings in the Town Hall the following October. It was suggested that the company join the Lawrence Rifles, but the Light Guard positively refused to do so, and chose the following officers: Capt., I. F. R. Hosea; 1st Lieut., J. Henry Eames; 2d Lieut., Henry A. Ireland, Jr. In May, 1866,re, for the Doctor Captain watched his men so closely that minor ills were cured before they developed into anything serious. All through the campaign he kept his promise made to the townspeople, I will look after the health of your boys. In October, 1st Lieut. Neilson was promoted to take command of Co. K, of Braintree; 2d Lieut. Whitney was promoted to his place. As section after section of those camped at Middletown left for the South, the 5th began to be disheartened; but on Novembe
September (search for this): chapter 1
the Rifles, Warren W. Manning and Fred. W. Dorr, should head the new organization. Lieut. Jophanus H. Whitney, of the Light Guard, was made 2d lieutenant. The consolidated company was organized May 5, 1874. Lieut. Dorr resigned the following September, and J. H. Whitney and Charles M. Green were commissioned 1st and 2d lieutenants. Capt. Manning resigned in 1876, and J. H. Whitney became captain. Rifle practice was inaugurated during his term of service. Through a combination of circumss, and as they threw themselves into their seats, there were many set faces among them, for they knew not when they would see Medford again. To the strains of Auld Lang Syne, the train moved out. The regiment remained at South Framingham until September, and put in hard work at drilling and camp duty. September 12 found our boys marching through coal dust to Camp Meade, on the banks of the Susquehanna. The camp was in a beautiful situation on a side hill sloping down to the river. Althoug
June, 1866 AD (search for this): chapter 1
following October. It was suggested that the company join the Lawrence Rifles, but the Light Guard positively refused to do so, and chose the following officers: Capt., I. F. R. Hosea; 1st Lieut., J. Henry Eames; 2d Lieut., Henry A. Ireland, Jr. In May, 1866, the 5th Regiment was inspected at the race course (Mystic Park). Co. E had three officers, fifty-seven men, and fifty-five guns. Fully two-thirds of the company were veterans; about thirty had served with the three years men. In June, 1866, the company began to fit up rooms in Usher's Building. The drill hall was shared with the Lawrence Rifles. At this time, when the Light Guard is about to take possession of an elegant building, a few items of the simple furnishings of the armory of 1866 are interesting. The woodwork was painted white; a black walnut picture moulding was put up; battle mottoes decorated the walls. Three pictures of battle scenes were donated, also a life size photograph of Mr. Daniel Lawrence. Milton
needed, but on May 24, the regiment was ordered to Gloucester for an eight days tour of duty. As it was not at all certain that the boys would be ordered back to Medford at its close, they were escorted to the cars by the citizens, High School Cadets, and Fire Department. The week was no play-time, for the weather was wet and stormy, and the regiment was exercised in war-time drills. A sharp but unrewarded watch was kept for the Spanish fleet. Orders were received that on the last day of June the Light Guard was to march to South Framingham and be mustered into the United States service. On the evening of June 29, the Opera House was packed to suffocation. Ex-commander George L. Goodale presided. Mayor Lewis H. Lovering made the opening address. Members of the City Government and the Grand Army, clergymen and officers of the company spoke words of inspiration and enthusiasm. Col. Whitney spoke in his quiet way, and stated that Co. E was the first in the regiment to report
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