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blew down the tents and upset the smoke stacks of the Sibley stoves, drenching rains which went through the tents as if they were paper, sounding, as the drops fell on the rubber blankets, like a tattoo on a snare drum, weather so cold that it froze the ears of men on guard, mud and the heaviest snow that had been known in that section for years, made the boys understand that campaigning was no pastime. Sickness developed in the camp and blues were the order of the day. In December, Wagoner Kiley, of Co. E, died of typhoid fever. His body was sent home and buried with military honors. Private Priggin went home about that time on account of sickness. In February there were more ill than at any time during the term of enlistment. The arrival of new tents, letters from home, which had been delayed, and certain news that they were to be mustered out, were good medicine for invalids. March 3, 1899, one of the Light Guard wrote home, The fashion of dying has ceased to be, and all
Reuben Williamson (search for this): chapter 1
to go around through Arlington and Cambridge, or via Malden bridge, to reach Boston. It was a pretty sight to see a large vessel on the way down the river, depending on the tide, and men with tow lines (no steam tugs in those days), and with Capt. John P. Clisby, the pilot, standing in the bow giving his orders. He was a large man, with a florid complexion, and looked every inch the sea captain. The river pilots, beside Capt. Clisby, that the writer can remember, were Benjamin and Reuben Williamson, William Snowdon, and James Porter. The town sold fishing privileges, and Seth, John, and Oliver Tufts, Thomas Huffmaster, and others, were in the business. An observer on the bridge could see flounders and sculpins in the clear water at low tide. Seals were sometimes captured, and bass were often caught with hook and line. At the parting of Mystic Ponds, fish were caught by seines where the dam is now. There were a few beaches where seines were set for catching alewives; wa
Daniel Lawrence (search for this): chapter 1
The Lawrence Light Guard.—Continued. by Helen Tilden Wild. [Read before the Medford Historical Society, May 19, 1902.] AS soon as Co. C, 39th Regiment, was dismissed from the United States service, in June, 1865, the members renewed their old battle mottoes decorated the walls. Three pictures of battle scenes were donated, also a life size photograph of Mr. Daniel Lawrence. Milton F. Roberts made the knapsack boxes from lumber furnished by the company. A Magee stove was set up, and soe conference committee agreed that the new company should be called Co. E, 5th Regt., M. V. M., and should bear the name Lawrence Light Guard, but that the captain and 1st lieutenant of the Rifles, Warren W. Manning and Fred. W. Dorr, should head thepanish War, the Light Guard established a temporary armory at No. 9 High street, while the new armory, a memorial to Daniel Lawrence, was being constructed. Three years have gone by since the close of the war. New men have taken the places of many
William Parker (search for this): chapter 1
d by his family. He dug a well on the street line and furnished a watering trough. This was probably the first one in town set at the street curb for public use. Mr. Hyde had a dispute with the town about the street line, and every few years would fence off a portion of the roadway. He finally received payment for what he claimed. George E. Willis, tin ware manufacturer, put up a building on these premises, using one-half of the lower floor for his business and living over his shop. William Parker, carriage trimmer, occupied the other half. Later Henry Forbes succeeded Mr. Willis, the latter going to the New England Gas Works at East Cambridge. The next building was the old Admiral Vernon Tavern, occupied by Benjamin Parker in our day for a dwelling, and it was the place of business of his sons, Benjamin, a mason, Gilbert, who had a job wagon, and Timothy and William, harness makers. There was a stone cutters' yard, shaded by a large poplar tree, between the house and Swan
Barber Blanchard (search for this): chapter 1
2; married, 1st, Rebecca Hall of Medford, November 13, 1745. She died November 13, 1749. He married, 2d, Tabitha Floyd, who was born March, 1729, and died July 31, 1775. His third wife was Rebecca Tufts, widow of Ichabod, and daughter of Samuel Francis of Medford; they were married November 14, 1776. She died in Medford, January 28, 1817. He died in Medford, January 7, 1787. He was the father of fourteen children. He was a periwig-maker and was generally referred to in Medford as Barber Blanchard. Benjamin Crandon Leonard. Benjamin Crandon Leonard was born in Plymouth, February 16, 1844. He was a son of Joseph Nelson and Abbie Bishop (Crandon) Leonard, and was a lineal descendant of John Howland and Richard Warren of the Mayflower. At the age of eighteen he obtained employment with the American Bank Note Co. of Boston, and remained with them the rest of his life. In 1879 he was appointed manager. He came to West Medford in 1872, and for thirty years was very active
Cleopas Boyd Johnson (search for this): chapter 1
rd, a member of this society, and Nathaniel Warren and Elizabeth Leonard. He died suddenly at his office in Boston, December 2, 1902, of heart disease. Cleopas Boyd Johnson. Cleopas Boyd Johnson, an honorary member of the Medford Historical Society, was born in Medford, January 6, 1829. His parents were John and Eliza (MeaCleopas Boyd Johnson, an honorary member of the Medford Historical Society, was born in Medford, January 6, 1829. His parents were John and Eliza (Mears) Johnson. He was the youngest of four children. He attended private and town schools, and was well liked by his mates. He left the high school early and served an apprenticeship at house carpentering in Medford. Then the family went to Oshkosh, Wisconsin, but after a short time returned to their old home. In those days thJohnson. He was the youngest of four children. He attended private and town schools, and was well liked by his mates. He left the high school early and served an apprenticeship at house carpentering in Medford. Then the family went to Oshkosh, Wisconsin, but after a short time returned to their old home. In those days they travelled via the Erie Canal. On his return he worked in the ship yards of Medford, and in the Navy Yard. When a young man he was a member of a brass band of musicians, and of the fire department. He was a Free Mason for many years and a charter member of the Medford lodge. He recently joined the Knights of Malta. He and
V. Aaron Blanchard (search for this): chapter 1
II. Joseph Blanchard, eldest son of George Blanchard, by his first wife, was born in 1654; married Hannah, daughter of Thomas Shepard of Charlestown, April 13, 1681. He had seven children, and died in Charlestown, on the Blanchard Farm, October 24, 1694, aged 40. His gravestone is in the Medford burying ground. IV. Aaron Blanchard, twin son of Joseph and Hannah (Shepard), was born March 4, 1690; married Sarah——; had twelve children; died at Medford, September 30, 1769 (?) V. Aaron Blanchard, Jr., son of Aaron and Sarah ——, was born in Medford, May 21, 1722; married, 1st, Rebecca Hall of Medford, November 13, 1745. She died November 13, 1749. He married, 2d, Tabitha Floyd, who was born March, 1729, and died July 31, 1775. His third wife was Rebecca Tufts, widow of Ichabod, and daughter of Samuel Francis of Medford; they were married November 14, 1776. She died in Medford, January 28, 1817. He died in Medford, January 7, 1787. He was the father of fourteen children. H
Humphreys (search for this): chapter 1
ht, as they waited an opportunity to prove their physical courage. That they did not suffer from disease as much as some other regiments camped even within a mile of them, was due to their obedience to orders regarding sanitation. Col. Whitney's experience in the Civil War made him especially careful in this respect. While we pity those who suffered so keenly, we must applaud those who, by keeping a model camp, preserved their health. Three members of the Light Guard, Messrs. Hall, Humphreys, and Cushing, enlisted in Co. A, 6th Regiment, and went to Porto Rico, where they participated in the battle of Guanica. Sergts. Garrett E. Barry and Amos D. Haskell went to the Philippines after their return from Greenville, and both have been commended for gallant service there. They are still in United States service in the islands. After the Spanish War, the Light Guard established a temporary armory at No. 9 High street, while the new armory, a memorial to Daniel Lawrence, was be
George E. Willis (search for this): chapter 1
robably the first one in town set at the street curb for public use. Mr. Hyde had a dispute with the town about the street line, and every few years would fence off a portion of the roadway. He finally received payment for what he claimed. George E. Willis, tin ware manufacturer, put up a building on these premises, using one-half of the lower floor for his business and living over his shop. William Parker, carriage trimmer, occupied the other half. Later Henry Forbes succeeded Mr. Willis, tMr. Willis, the latter going to the New England Gas Works at East Cambridge. The next building was the old Admiral Vernon Tavern, occupied by Benjamin Parker in our day for a dwelling, and it was the place of business of his sons, Benjamin, a mason, Gilbert, who had a job wagon, and Timothy and William, harness makers. There was a stone cutters' yard, shaded by a large poplar tree, between the house and Swan street. At different times the proprietors were Mr. Ridgley, Samuel Cady and Mr. Cabot. Rough
W. K. Watkins (search for this): chapter 1
Saturday evening course of lectures for 1903 offers an attractive set of topics. Last month Mr. Walter C. Wright read a paper on the Gypsy Moth: Past, Present and Future, describing the habits of the pest and the most effective way of ridding the city of its ravages. He placed great responsibility on individual occupants of real estate, who might, by conscientious work, keep the moth in check on private property, while the State and City could be fully occupied in taking care of the trees in reservations, parks and highways. The following papers will be given during the winter and spring:— January 3.—Some Evils of our present Nominating System, and how they can be removed. Hon. F. W. Dallinger, of Cambridge. February 7.—Matthew Cradock. Mr. W. K. Watkins, of Malden. March 7.—How can we make Medford more beautiful? Mr. Edward P. Adams. April 4.—The Second Charter of Massachusetts. Mr. Walter H. Cushing. May 2.—Spot Pond, as it was and is. Mr. Herbert
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