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William Butters (search for this): chapter 1
ile unloading freight at the Boston & Lowell Railroad at West Medford. Mr. James Winneck succeeded him in the grocery business. Next south of Mr. Moore's property was a dwelling house occupied by the family of Mrs. Daniel Symmes, and by William Butters, known as Hokum Butters, who worked at teaming with his oxen. George W. Symmes carried on his father's blacksmith business in a shop next to the house. There was a pump between Mr. Moore's house and the Symmes' house, which, with two othButters, who worked at teaming with his oxen. George W. Symmes carried on his father's blacksmith business in a shop next to the house. There was a pump between Mr. Moore's house and the Symmes' house, which, with two others, furnished all the water used by families living between the river and South and Swan streets. The next nearest sources of water supply were the town pump in the square and the one in the hotel yard. Water for washing was often brought from the Middlesex Canal and from the distillery. On the corner of South and Main streets was the Watts Turner place. He was the grandfather of the Tufts family who occupied it in 1850. Two sisters, Miss Hannah and Miss Emily Tufts, their brothers, Benj
orge E. Willis, tin ware manufacturer, put up a building on these premises, using one-half of the lower floor for his business and living over his shop. William Parker, carriage trimmer, occupied the other half. Later Henry Forbes succeeded Mr. Willis, the latter going to the New England Gas Works at East Cambridge. The next building was the old Admiral Vernon Tavern, occupied by Benjamin Parker in our day for a dwelling, and it was the place of business of his sons, Benjamin, a mason, Gilbert, who had a job wagon, and Timothy and William, harness makers. There was a stone cutters' yard, shaded by a large poplar tree, between the house and Swan street. At different times the proprietors were Mr. Ridgley, Samuel Cady and Mr. Cabot. Rough and hammered stone, the product of Pasture Hill and two quarries above Pine Hill, was sent out in drags drawn by four horses harnessed tandem. The trade extended over a large territory. The fashion of keeping one's residence and business
Rebecca Tufts (search for this): chapter 1
gravestone is in the Medford burying ground. IV. Aaron Blanchard, twin son of Joseph and Hannah (Shepard), was born March 4, 1690; married Sarah——; had twelve children; died at Medford, September 30, 1769 (?) V. Aaron Blanchard, Jr., son of Aaron and Sarah ——, was born in Medford, May 21, 1722; married, 1st, Rebecca Hall of Medford, November 13, 1745. She died November 13, 1749. He married, 2d, Tabitha Floyd, who was born March, 1729, and died July 31, 1775. His third wife was Rebecca Tufts, widow of Ichabod, and daughter of Samuel Francis of Medford; they were married November 14, 1776. She died in Medford, January 28, 1817. He died in Medford, January 7, 1787. He was the father of fourteen children. He was a periwig-maker and was generally referred to in Medford as Barber Blanchard. Benjamin Crandon Leonard. Benjamin Crandon Leonard was born in Plymouth, February 16, 1844. He was a son of Joseph Nelson and Abbie Bishop (Crandon) Leonard, and was a lineal des
Blaisdell (search for this): chapter 1
early member of the Medford Historical Society, but was more interested in the standing and development of Medford in the twentieth century than in the study of the ancient history of the town. Yet he was ever loyal and proud of his Pilgrim ancestors, and was true to their best traditions and principles. He married Abbie Leonard, who was a charter member of the Congregational Church of West Medford. After her death he married Miss Emma Fuller, daughter of George H. and Nancy Evelina (Blaisdell) Fuller of West Medford. She survives him and three children, viz.: Joseph Nelson Leonard, a member of this society, and Nathaniel Warren and Elizabeth Leonard. He died suddenly at his office in Boston, December 2, 1902, of heart disease. Cleopas Boyd Johnson. Cleopas Boyd Johnson, an honorary member of the Medford Historical Society, was born in Medford, January 6, 1829. His parents were John and Eliza (Mears) Johnson. He was the youngest of four children. He attended private a
Thomas Huffmaster (search for this): chapter 1
vessel on the way down the river, depending on the tide, and men with tow lines (no steam tugs in those days), and with Capt. John P. Clisby, the pilot, standing in the bow giving his orders. He was a large man, with a florid complexion, and looked every inch the sea captain. The river pilots, beside Capt. Clisby, that the writer can remember, were Benjamin and Reuben Williamson, William Snowdon, and James Porter. The town sold fishing privileges, and Seth, John, and Oliver Tufts, Thomas Huffmaster, and others, were in the business. An observer on the bridge could see flounders and sculpins in the clear water at low tide. Seals were sometimes captured, and bass were often caught with hook and line. At the parting of Mystic Ponds, fish were caught by seines where the dam is now. There were a few beaches where seines were set for catching alewives; wagon loads of these were often taken, salted, and shipped south. A few shad were captured in this way. Joseph and Milton J
Abbie Leonard (search for this): chapter 1
r of the park commission of Medford, and chairman of the board at the time of his death. He was a strong and influential advocate of the Mystic Valley Parkway. He was an early member of the Medford Historical Society, but was more interested in the standing and development of Medford in the twentieth century than in the study of the ancient history of the town. Yet he was ever loyal and proud of his Pilgrim ancestors, and was true to their best traditions and principles. He married Abbie Leonard, who was a charter member of the Congregational Church of West Medford. After her death he married Miss Emma Fuller, daughter of George H. and Nancy Evelina (Blaisdell) Fuller of West Medford. She survives him and three children, viz.: Joseph Nelson Leonard, a member of this society, and Nathaniel Warren and Elizabeth Leonard. He died suddenly at his office in Boston, December 2, 1902, of heart disease. Cleopas Boyd Johnson. Cleopas Boyd Johnson, an honorary member of the Medfor
Andrew Belcher (search for this): chapter 1
ries ago. Brooks, in his history, used about all the existing material concerning John Albree. The first record of him is in a list of those assessed September 2, 1701, on a country rate, the amount being three shillings. His name appears on the lists each succeeding year. In 1711, he married Elizabeth Green, who was daughter of Samuel Green (John 2, Percival 1), and his wife, Elizabeth Sill, who was daughter of Joseph Sill and his wife, Jemima Belcher, the latter being the daughter of Andrew Belcher and Elizabeth Danforth. He bought first the property afterwards known as the Thatcher Magoun estate, on the banks of the Mystic, and later, selling it, acquired the estate through which Meeting House Brook runs, on which the second meeting-house was built. He used the brook for power for his mill. It seems probable that Rural avenue was a road to his house. His grandson told how the road used to be blocked with snow in the winter. There his children and his son's children were born.
Paul Curtis (search for this): chapter 1
und around the barrels, responsive to the sturdy muscles of the blacksmiths, Wait and Moore, and their men, was a common sound. Above the bridge were three ship yards, one lumber yard, and a tan yard. Occasionally other traffic caused the draw to be opened. Mr. George Fuller, who lived in the house owned now by the heirs of Albert H. Butters, numbered 48 South street, had a ship yard on both sides of the street, and included the premises occupied in 1903 by Mr. F. E. Chandler. Mr. Paul Curtis' yard was on the corner of South and Winthrop streets; he launched directly across the roadway. He built and occupied the large house with pillars, later occupied by Rev. Mr. Davis, pastor of the Universalist Church, and owned now by Mr. J. N. Cowin. Curtis street is named in remembrance of this ship builder. Mr. Davis removed to Cape Cod, and the vessel which was to carry his goods to the new home came to the very door to be loaded. Mr. Jotham Stetson's yard was above the Winthrop
Elias Tufts (search for this): chapter 1
the fire and stands today very much like the original in general outline. Mr. Barker later removed to High street, just east of the old Orthodox Church. In the rear of the Wait and Barker buildings were the dwelling and wheelwright shop of Elias Tufts, entered from a passageway now called Tufts place. His father had a large pottery there many years ago. In the building just south of Tufts place, Mrs. Augustus Baker, afterward the landlady at the Medford House, had a variety store in 1830d business under one roof has long ago disappeared, but from 1835 to 1850, the custom was almost universal. After the fire in 1850, most of the buildings destroyed were replaced by cheaper structures, many of which are still in existence. The Tufts lot, corner of South and Main streets, remained vacant for many years. Finally, the Central Engine House was built there. Ancestry of Aaron Blanchard, periwig-maker. I. Thomas Blanchard, the emigrant, came from Hampshire, England, in 1639.
Jophanus H. Whitney (search for this): chapter 1
ame Lawrence Light Guard, but that the captain and 1st lieutenant of the Rifles, Warren W. Manning and Fred. W. Dorr, should head the new organization. Lieut. Jophanus H. Whitney, of the Light Guard, was made 2d lieutenant. The consolidated company was organized May 5, 1874. Lieut. Dorr resigned the following September, and J. HJ. H. Whitney and Charles M. Green were commissioned 1st and 2d lieutenants. Capt. Manning resigned in 1876, and J. H. Whitney became captain. Rifle practice was inaugurated during his term of service. Through a combination of circumstances, the interest in the State militia began to wane about 1880, and the Light Guard suffered wJ. H. Whitney became captain. Rifle practice was inaugurated during his term of service. Through a combination of circumstances, the interest in the State militia began to wane about 1880, and the Light Guard suffered with the whole. In 1881, it is recorded under the date of September 6, the celebrated yellow day, that eight men and one officer answered roll call and started for muster. The largest company in the regiment mustered only twenty-eight men on the opening day. On the following Wednesday, orders came from headquarters that each comp
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