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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 6.. Search the whole document.

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Jotham Stetson (search for this): chapter 1
1903 by Mr. F. E. Chandler. Mr. Paul Curtis' yard was on the corner of South and Winthrop streets; he launched directly across the roadway. He built and occupied the large house with pillars, later occupied by Rev. Mr. Davis, pastor of the Universalist Church, and owned now by Mr. J. N. Cowin. Curtis street is named in remembrance of this ship builder. Mr. Davis removed to Cape Cod, and the vessel which was to carry his goods to the new home came to the very door to be loaded. Mr. Jotham Stetson's yard was above the Winthrop Note.—Old Clocks and Watches and their Makers by F. J. Britten (London, 1899) is valuable for facts concerning the general subject of time-pieces, while the results of the exhaustive researches of Dr. Irving Lyon, given in his Colonial Furniture (Boston, 1890, now unfortunately out of print), should be studied by those desiring to learn the state of the art in the Colonies. As to hall clocks, consult in addition Notes on Long Case Clocks, in Studio Mag
Matthew Cradock (search for this): chapter 1
Saturday evening course of lectures for 1903 offers an attractive set of topics. Last month Mr. Walter C. Wright read a paper on the Gypsy Moth: Past, Present and Future, describing the habits of the pest and the most effective way of ridding the city of its ravages. He placed great responsibility on individual occupants of real estate, who might, by conscientious work, keep the moth in check on private property, while the State and City could be fully occupied in taking care of the trees in reservations, parks and highways. The following papers will be given during the winter and spring:— January 3.—Some Evils of our present Nominating System, and how they can be removed. Hon. F. W. Dallinger, of Cambridge. February 7.—Matthew Cradock. Mr. W. K. Watkins, of Malden. March 7.—How can we make Medford more beautiful? Mr. Edward P. Adams. April 4.—The Second Charter of Massachusetts. Mr. Walter H. Cushing. May 2.—Spot Pond, as it was and is. Mr. Herbert
George Blanchard (search for this): chapter 1
——, after coming to New England, his second wife having died on the passage over. Four of his sons came to this country. He died on his farm in Charlestown, May 21, 1654; his widow died at Noddle's Island, now East Boston, in 1676. II. George Blanchard had two wives and ten children; lived on one-half of the farm inherited from his father, and died there March 18, 1700, aged 84. His gravestone is in the Medford burying ground. III. Joseph Blanchard, eldest son of George Blanchard, by George Blanchard, by his first wife, was born in 1654; married Hannah, daughter of Thomas Shepard of Charlestown, April 13, 1681. He had seven children, and died in Charlestown, on the Blanchard Farm, October 24, 1694, aged 40. His gravestone is in the Medford burying ground. IV. Aaron Blanchard, twin son of Joseph and Hannah (Shepard), was born March 4, 1690; married Sarah——; had twelve children; died at Medford, September 30, 1769 (?) V. Aaron Blanchard, Jr., son of Aaron and Sarah ——, was born in M
Elizabeth Leonard (search for this): chapter 1
y of the ancient history of the town. Yet he was ever loyal and proud of his Pilgrim ancestors, and was true to their best traditions and principles. He married Abbie Leonard, who was a charter member of the Congregational Church of West Medford. After her death he married Miss Emma Fuller, daughter of George H. and Nancy Evelina (Blaisdell) Fuller of West Medford. She survives him and three children, viz.: Joseph Nelson Leonard, a member of this society, and Nathaniel Warren and Elizabeth Leonard. He died suddenly at his office in Boston, December 2, 1902, of heart disease. Cleopas Boyd Johnson. Cleopas Boyd Johnson, an honorary member of the Medford Historical Society, was born in Medford, January 6, 1829. His parents were John and Eliza (Mears) Johnson. He was the youngest of four children. He attended private and town schools, and was well liked by his mates. He left the high school early and served an apprenticeship at house carpentering in Medford. Then the fa
1, 1775. His third wife was Rebecca Tufts, widow of Ichabod, and daughter of Samuel Francis of Medford; they were married November 14, 1776. She died in Medford, January 28, 1817. He died in Medford, January 7, 1787. He was the father of fourteen children. He was a periwig-maker and was generally referred to in Medford as Barber Blanchard. Benjamin Crandon Leonard. Benjamin Crandon Leonard was born in Plymouth, February 16, 1844. He was a son of Joseph Nelson and Abbie Bishop (Crandon) Leonard, and was a lineal descendant of John Howland and Richard Warren of the Mayflower. At the age of eighteen he obtained employment with the American Bank Note Co. of Boston, and remained with them the rest of his life. In 1879 he was appointed manager. He came to West Medford in 1872, and for thirty years was very active in local matters and town affairs. He was deeply interested in the organization and support of the West Medford Congregational Church and society, and for more
Joseph James (search for this): chapter 1
th. A few shad were captured in this way. Joseph and Milton James, before 1845, had a lumber yard on Main street, at the southwest corner of the bridge. Mr. Joseph James lived just south of the yard, where Ames' paint shop, No. 49 Main street, stands. About 1845, the Messrs. James sold their property here and removed theirJames sold their property here and removed their business to the Branch Canal, near Swan street. Parallel with Main street was an inclined way leading from the lumber yard to the river at the bridge, which was used as a boat landing and for hauling timber from the river. Some of the very earliest deeds refer to this landing, which was public property before that part of Medf was built over the old runway to the river. It was in Gregg's stable that the great fire of 1850 began. When Mr. Gregg took possession of the northern half of James' yard, Mr. Benjamin Moore moved his blacksmith shop from the other side of the street to the southerly part of the yard, and his family moved from Union street to
Oliver Tufts (search for this): chapter 1
t to see a large vessel on the way down the river, depending on the tide, and men with tow lines (no steam tugs in those days), and with Capt. John P. Clisby, the pilot, standing in the bow giving his orders. He was a large man, with a florid complexion, and looked every inch the sea captain. The river pilots, beside Capt. Clisby, that the writer can remember, were Benjamin and Reuben Williamson, William Snowdon, and James Porter. The town sold fishing privileges, and Seth, John, and Oliver Tufts, Thomas Huffmaster, and others, were in the business. An observer on the bridge could see flounders and sculpins in the clear water at low tide. Seals were sometimes captured, and bass were often caught with hook and line. At the parting of Mystic Ponds, fish were caught by seines where the dam is now. There were a few beaches where seines were set for catching alewives; wagon loads of these were often taken, salted, and shipped south. A few shad were captured in this way. Jos
I. Thomas Blanchard (search for this): chapter 1
a large territory. The fashion of keeping one's residence and business under one roof has long ago disappeared, but from 1835 to 1850, the custom was almost universal. After the fire in 1850, most of the buildings destroyed were replaced by cheaper structures, many of which are still in existence. The Tufts lot, corner of South and Main streets, remained vacant for many years. Finally, the Central Engine House was built there. Ancestry of Aaron Blanchard, periwig-maker. I. Thomas Blanchard, the emigrant, came from Hampshire, England, in 1639. He lived in Braintree, Mass., from 1646 to 1651. In February, 1651, he bought of Rev. John Wilson, Jr., pastor of the church in Dorchester, a house and farm of two hundred acres in Charlestown, lying on the north side of Mystic river, and between Malden river on the east, and the Cradock farm, or Medford line, on the west. This land is now known as Wellington. The farm remained a part of the town of Charlestown until 1726,, whe
Walter C. Wright (search for this): chapter 1
nuary meeting of the society, Hon. C. H. Porter, of Quincy, gave an address, entitled The 39th Massachusetts Regiment in the Civil War. From personal observation, careful study of official reports and the writings of various commanders, he was able to give his hearers a vivid account of the movements of the regiment from the time of its organization until the victory before Richmond. The Saturday evening course of lectures for 1903 offers an attractive set of topics. Last month Mr. Walter C. Wright read a paper on the Gypsy Moth: Past, Present and Future, describing the habits of the pest and the most effective way of ridding the city of its ravages. He placed great responsibility on individual occupants of real estate, who might, by conscientious work, keep the moth in check on private property, while the State and City could be fully occupied in taking care of the trees in reservations, parks and highways. The following papers will be given during the winter and spring:—
John P. Clisby (search for this): chapter 1
around through Arlington and Cambridge, or via Malden bridge, to reach Boston. It was a pretty sight to see a large vessel on the way down the river, depending on the tide, and men with tow lines (no steam tugs in those days), and with Capt. John P. Clisby, the pilot, standing in the bow giving his orders. He was a large man, with a florid complexion, and looked every inch the sea captain. The river pilots, beside Capt. Clisby, that the writer can remember, were Benjamin and Reuben WilliamCapt. Clisby, that the writer can remember, were Benjamin and Reuben Williamson, William Snowdon, and James Porter. The town sold fishing privileges, and Seth, John, and Oliver Tufts, Thomas Huffmaster, and others, were in the business. An observer on the bridge could see flounders and sculpins in the clear water at low tide. Seals were sometimes captured, and bass were often caught with hook and line. At the parting of Mystic Ponds, fish were caught by seines where the dam is now. There were a few beaches where seines were set for catching alewives; wagon lo
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