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John Francis (search for this): chapter 1
cial acts, determined for us who twenty-five of the best citizens were, and the list is found in Brooks' History of Medford (page 334). Who of us would dare to serve on a committee to nominate the twenty-five men in our respective churches who are entitled to have the first choice of seats? What heart burnings must have been caused by that custom. It is a wonder it continued so long. Of this list of twenty-five, there are on file inventories of the contents of the homes of twelve. Mr. John Francis, Sr., who heads the list, did not live long to enjoy the best pew in the new meeting house, which had been built on land bought from John Albree. A large pewter platter which he gave his daughter, Lydia, on her marriage is still in existence, even though one of her descendants did use it as a cover for a flour barrel. During the twenty years subsequent to the making of the list, seven of those pewholders passed on to where congregations ne'er break up and Sabbaths have no end. Of these
Joseph Blanchard (search for this): chapter 1
ce in England, and married a third wife, Mary——, after coming to New England, his second wife having died on the passage over. Four of his sons came to this country. He died on his farm in Charlestown, May 21, 1654; his widow died at Noddle's Island, now East Boston, in 1676. II. George Blanchard had two wives and ten children; lived on one-half of the farm inherited from his father, and died there March 18, 1700, aged 84. His gravestone is in the Medford burying ground. III. Joseph Blanchard, eldest son of George Blanchard, by his first wife, was born in 1654; married Hannah, daughter of Thomas Shepard of Charlestown, April 13, 1681. He had seven children, and died in Charlestown, on the Blanchard Farm, October 24, 1694, aged 40. His gravestone is in the Medford burying ground. IV. Aaron Blanchard, twin son of Joseph and Hannah (Shepard), was born March 4, 1690; married Sarah——; had twelve children; died at Medford, September 30, 1769 (?) V. Aaron Blanchard, Jr.,
he married Miss Emma Fuller, daughter of George H. and Nancy Evelina (Blaisdell) Fuller of West Medford. She survives him and three children, viz.: Joseph Nelson Leonard, a member of this society, and Nathaniel Warren and Elizabeth Leonard. He died suddenly at his office in Boston, December 2, 1902, of heart disease. Cleopas Boyd Johnson. Cleopas Boyd Johnson, an honorary member of the Medford Historical Society, was born in Medford, January 6, 1829. His parents were John and Eliza (Mears) Johnson. He was the youngest of four children. He attended private and town schools, and was well liked by his mates. He left the high school early and served an apprenticeship at house carpentering in Medford. Then the family went to Oshkosh, Wisconsin, but after a short time returned to their old home. In those days they travelled via the Erie Canal. On his return he worked in the ship yards of Medford, and in the Navy Yard. When a young man he was a member of a brass band of musi
Thomas Shepard (search for this): chapter 1
inherited from his father, and died there March 18, 1700, aged 84. His gravestone is in the Medford burying ground. III. Joseph Blanchard, eldest son of George Blanchard, by his first wife, was born in 1654; married Hannah, daughter of Thomas Shepard of Charlestown, April 13, 1681. He had seven children, and died in Charlestown, on the Blanchard Farm, October 24, 1694, aged 40. His gravestone is in the Medford burying ground. IV. Aaron Blanchard, twin son of Joseph and Hannah (ShepaShepard), was born March 4, 1690; married Sarah——; had twelve children; died at Medford, September 30, 1769 (?) V. Aaron Blanchard, Jr., son of Aaron and Sarah ——, was born in Medford, May 21, 1722; married, 1st, Rebecca Hall of Medford, November 13, 1745. She died November 13, 1749. He married, 2d, Tabitha Floyd, who was born March, 1729, and died July 31, 1775. His third wife was Rebecca Tufts, widow of Ichabod, and daughter of Samuel Francis of Medford; they were married November 14, 1776.
Mr. Willis, the latter going to the New England Gas Works at East Cambridge. The next building was the old Admiral Vernon Tavern, occupied by Benjamin Parker in our day for a dwelling, and it was the place of business of his sons, Benjamin, a mason, Gilbert, who had a job wagon, and Timothy and William, harness makers. There was a stone cutters' yard, shaded by a large poplar tree, between the house and Swan street. At different times the proprietors were Mr. Ridgley, Samuel Cady and Mr. Cabot. Rough and hammered stone, the product of Pasture Hill and two quarries above Pine Hill, was sent out in drags drawn by four horses harnessed tandem. The trade extended over a large territory. The fashion of keeping one's residence and business under one roof has long ago disappeared, but from 1835 to 1850, the custom was almost universal. After the fire in 1850, most of the buildings destroyed were replaced by cheaper structures, many of which are still in existence. The Tufts l
Leonard Johnson (search for this): chapter 1
the neighborhood which was not consumed on the memorable night of November 2, 1850. Mr. Wait succeeded his father, Nathan Wait, who started the business on the same spot in 1783. The property remained in the family until taken by the Metropolitan Park Commission, in 1901. Mr. Wait's dwelling house was next south of his shop. He went into it in 1826. After it was burned, he built the house now standing on the site. The next building was occupied by William S. Barker grocer, and Leonard Johnson, dealer in grain and meal on the lower floor. James Hyde, painter, occupied the second floor. There were two long oat troughs at the side of the street for feeding horses. The drivers could get gingerbread, crackers, cheese, and beer in the store while their horses were being refreshed by the roadside. The building was rebuilt after the fire and stands today very much like the original in general outline. Mr. Barker later removed to High street, just east of the old Orthodox Churc
T. C. Henderson (search for this): chapter 1
represented the State. The first indoor prize drill occurred in 1885. The company gave a gold medal, the veterans two silver ones. The organization supported a drum and fife corps at this time. After another period of depression Capt. T. C. Henderson took command in 1889. He worked hard to bring the company back to its former rank, and was rewarded by a letter of commendation from Col. Bancroft. March 30, 1890, the first prize drill for the Lawrence medals was held. During theew regulations were promulgated regarding target practice, by which members of the militia were obliged to qualify as marksmen or be discharged. These rules had a tendency to stimulate the attendance and interest in the Light Guard, which Capt. Henderson and Capt. Wescott, his successor, worked hard to bring about. The Light Guard attended the inauguration of President McKinley in 1897. In this peaceful advance to the capital, thirty-six years after the gray-coated minute men started for
Samuel Green (search for this): chapter 1
life in Medford, and the tradition is that this is the clock. An investigation into this tradition will give us an insight into the Medford homes of two centuries ago. Brooks, in his history, used about all the existing material concerning John Albree. The first record of him is in a list of those assessed September 2, 1701, on a country rate, the amount being three shillings. His name appears on the lists each succeeding year. In 1711, he married Elizabeth Green, who was daughter of Samuel Green (John 2, Percival 1), and his wife, Elizabeth Sill, who was daughter of Joseph Sill and his wife, Jemima Belcher, the latter being the daughter of Andrew Belcher and Elizabeth Danforth. He bought first the property afterwards known as the Thatcher Magoun estate, on the banks of the Mystic, and later, selling it, acquired the estate through which Meeting House Brook runs, on which the second meeting-house was built. He used the brook for power for his mill. It seems probable that Rural
Daniel Symmes (search for this): chapter 1
f the yard, and his family moved from Union street to the Joseph James house. Mr. Moore, in company with John Fall, a shipsmith, and J. T. Barker, a teamster, took the teaming business of Mr. Gregg after his death. The latter was killed by being caught between two cars while unloading freight at the Boston & Lowell Railroad at West Medford. Mr. James Winneck succeeded him in the grocery business. Next south of Mr. Moore's property was a dwelling house occupied by the family of Mrs. Daniel Symmes, and by William Butters, known as Hokum Butters, who worked at teaming with his oxen. George W. Symmes carried on his father's blacksmith business in a shop next to the house. There was a pump between Mr. Moore's house and the Symmes' house, which, with two others, furnished all the water used by families living between the river and South and Swan streets. The next nearest sources of water supply were the town pump in the square and the one in the hotel yard. Water for washing w
Aaron Blanchard (search for this): chapter 1
ildings destroyed were replaced by cheaper structures, many of which are still in existence. The Tufts lot, corner of South and Main streets, remained vacant for many years. Finally, the Central Engine House was built there. Ancestry of Aaron Blanchard, periwig-maker. I. Thomas Blanchard, the emigrant, came from Hampshire, England, in 1639. He lived in Braintree, Mass., from 1646 to 1651. In February, 1651, he bought of Rev. John Wilson, Jr., pastor of the church in Dorchester, a housin 1654; married Hannah, daughter of Thomas Shepard of Charlestown, April 13, 1681. He had seven children, and died in Charlestown, on the Blanchard Farm, October 24, 1694, aged 40. His gravestone is in the Medford burying ground. IV. Aaron Blanchard, twin son of Joseph and Hannah (Shepard), was born March 4, 1690; married Sarah——; had twelve children; died at Medford, September 30, 1769 (?) V. Aaron Blanchard, Jr., son of Aaron and Sarah ——, was born in Medford, May 21, 1722; marrie
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