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Stephen Francis (search for this): chapter 1
house at which Mr. Dunton was entertained in the year 1686. At that date there were but three great highways leading through Medford, viz.: the highway now known as Grove street, the highway from Medford bridge to Woburn (part of High street and all of Woburn street) and the Highway to Malden (Salem street). So far as we know the house of Mr. Caleb Brooks, and possibly the house of Captain Timothy Wheeler, afterwards that of Mr. Ebenezer Prout, and still later that of Messrs. John and Stephen Francis, were the only houses on the first named highway at that date, and there is no evidence that either of those parties were ever licensed as tavern keepers. On the highway from Medford bridge to Woburn were the two houses of Major Jonathan Wade (one of which was probably the old Cradock Mansion) and that of Mr. John Bradshaw; nor is there any evidence that these houses were used as taverns. On the highway to Malden there was but a single house, that of Jonathan Tufts near the Malden lin
Samuel Wade (search for this): chapter 1
the Fountain Tavern. Mr. Leath, senior, was landlord in the year 1714. During that year the estate was deeded back to Mr. Seccomb, who immediately sold to Captain Samuel Wade. In the year 1715, and for many years thereafter, Captain Wade was landlord of this tavern. In the year 1735 he sold the estate to Messrs. Stephen Hall, jCaptain Wade was landlord of this tavern. In the year 1735 he sold the estate to Messrs. Stephen Hall, junior, Stephen and Simon Bradshaw. In the deed the house is spoken of as a dwelling house. In the year 1751 Mr. Simon Bradshaw sold one-half of a house to Mr. Stephen Bradshaw, and it was described as at a place formerly called the Fountain. By this sale Mr. Stephen Bradshaw came into the possession of the whole estate. Mr. came into possession of the property. From the year 1739 to 1743, both inclusive, the landlords of this tavern were Messrs. John Reed, Abraham Skinner, and Captain Samuel Wade. Under date of December 26, 1743, Colonel Royall advertised as follows: any person beforehanded so as to lay in a good stock of liquors and other necessari
Albert Smith (search for this): chapter 1
d these names appearing in such regular order, leads to the belief that they may have been occupants of this house. The Peirces were located here without doubt, still this evidence, while it seems probable, is by no means conclusive, for Mr. John Hall, senior, lived on what is now the corner of High and Allston streets. Mr. Stephen Hall, his son, probably lived in his father's house, and Mr. John Hall, junior, lived on the Woburn road, on or near the spot where the house of the late Mr. Albert Smith now stands, and they may have done business at their residences. Let us now consider what evidence there is to authorize us to believe that the house of Mr. Willis was the house at which Mr. Dunton was entertained in the year 1686. At that date there were but three great highways leading through Medford, viz.: the highway now known as Grove street, the highway from Medford bridge to Woburn (part of High street and all of Woburn street) and the Highway to Malden (Salem street). So far
Nathaniel Wade (search for this): chapter 1
to keep the same and we do present it to this Honored Court believing you would grant him a license. Meadford the 14th, April, 1690, by order of the Selectmen, Nath. Wade. John Hall Jun. The court granted Mr. Woodward a license. Where his house was located we have no means of determining (possibly it was the Willis Tavern). Hers &c. and Mr. Thomas Willis proffering to supply said defect, the Selectmen of Meadford do allow of his proffer accounting him a fitting man for that purpose. Nath. Wade. Stephen Willis. Selectmen of Meadford. The court granted Mr. Willis a license. Again in the year 1692 the selectmen addressed the court. To the Hon. JusticRum, Syder &c. and to keep a House of Public Entertainment for the use of the town and strangers dated 18 day of July 1692. from your Worships humble servants, Nath. Wade, Stephen Willis, John Whitmore, Selectmen of Meadford. Mr. Willis was again granted a license. The next year (1693) we find Mr. Willis again licensed. Wher
Robert Usher (search for this): chapter 1
g his ownership. Mr. John Bradshaw, in the first part of the year 1750, kept the Admiral Vernon Tavern in Charlestown. He removed to Medford and was licensed as an innholder the latter part of that year, and in the years 1751-52-53. He died in the year 1753, and his widow, Mercy Bradshaw, was licensed for the remainder of the year, and the record reads that she occupied the house formerly of Mr. William Willis. Mr. Reaves sold in the year 1784 to Mr. Abijah Usher of Roxbury. In 1792 Mr. Robert Usher was licensed as an innholder and kept this tavern. He was succeeded by Messrs. Abijah Usher, Eleazer Usher, Wyman Weston, Ebenezer Putnam and others. The estate passed from the ownership of Mr. Usher, and through many different persons down to the present day; it is now in the possession of Mr. F. E. Chandler. This estate has been aptly described as a well chosen location for a place of entertainment for tired horses and thirsty men, at the foot of that sharp rise in the road known
Rufus Sawyer (search for this): chapter 1
ld to Mr. Nathaniel Hall, from Mr. Hall the estate passed through the ownership of many different persons, down to the present day. Some of these owning only one-half of the house. There is no evidence that this house was used as a tavern from the year 1734 until the year 1775, when it was occupied by Mr. Bradshaw, although it is very probable that it was sometimes used as a place where liquors were sold, nor is it likely that it was used as a tavern after Mr. Bradshaw's day. The late Mr. Rufus Sawyer took down the old building and erected on its site the house now standing on the easterly corner of Salem and Fountain streets. The Royal Oak Tavern. This tavern stood upon land purchased of Dr. Oliver Noyes by Mr. Benjamin Willis in the year 1717. The estate was described as a house lot near Medford bridge, bounded west and northwest on the country road; northeast on a highway laid out from the country road to land of Aaron Cleveland; southeast on land of John Hall; southwest on
Sagamore John (search for this): chapter 1
Mr. Willis was the house at which Mr. Dunton was entertained in the year 1686. At that date there were but three great highways leading through Medford, viz.: the highway now known as Grove street, the highway from Medford bridge to Woburn (part of High street and all of Woburn street) and the Highway to Malden (Salem street). So far as we know the house of Mr. Caleb Brooks, and possibly the house of Captain Timothy Wheeler, afterwards that of Mr. Ebenezer Prout, and still later that of Messrs. John and Stephen Francis, were the only houses on the first named highway at that date, and there is no evidence that either of those parties were ever licensed as tavern keepers. On the highway from Medford bridge to Woburn were the two houses of Major Jonathan Wade (one of which was probably the old Cradock Mansion) and that of Mr. John Bradshaw; nor is there any evidence that these houses were used as taverns. On the highway to Malden there was but a single house, that of Jonathan Tufts n
Hugh Floyd (search for this): chapter 1
ty to Mr. John Bradshaw, junior, who was the landlord until the year 1740, when he was succeeded by Mrs. Sarah Floyd. In the year 1748 Mr. Bradshaw sold the estate to Mr. Benjamin Floyd. From that date to the year 1759, when it was sold to Mr. Hugh Floyd, the house was kept by Mr. Benjamin Floyd and others. From the year 1759 to 1772 Mr. Hugh Floyd kept the tavern the greater part of the time. In the latter year he sold to Mr. Ebenezer Hills, who kept the house in the year 1773. Mr. Hills, Mr. Hugh Floyd kept the tavern the greater part of the time. In the latter year he sold to Mr. Ebenezer Hills, who kept the house in the year 1773. Mr. Hills, in the year 1774, sold to Mr. Jonathan Porter. Mr. Porter was landlord from the year 1774 to 1786, both inclusive. He took down the old house soon after, and built the house now standing on the premises. The old swinging sign that hung in front of this tavern is dated 1769. It is in a good state of preservation, except that one of the spindles is broken. The emblem and lettering is quite distinct, as indeed they might be, as the sign hung exposed to the weather only seventeen years. Whethe
Aaron Cleveland (search for this): chapter 1
ge, bounded west and northwest on the country road; northeast on a highway laid out from the country road to land of Aaron Cleveland; southeast on land of John Hall; southwest on the wharf and dock. The wharf referred to was that of Major Jonathan the lot of land at the corner of Main and Swan streets, opposite the Central Fire Station, upon land purchased by Mr. Aaron Cleveland in the year 1717 of the Hon. John Usher. It was a part of Gov. Winthrop's Ten Hills Farm. As Mr. Cleveland was gMr. Cleveland was granted an innholder's license in the year 1720, this house must have been built prior to that date. Mr. Cleveland was the landlord of this tavern from the year 1720 to 1738, both inclusive. In the latter year he sold the estate to Colonel Isaac RoMr. Cleveland was the landlord of this tavern from the year 1720 to 1738, both inclusive. In the latter year he sold the estate to Colonel Isaac Royall, senior. After the death of Colonel Royall in the year 1739, his son, Colonel Isaac Royall, junior, came into possession of the property. From the year 1739 to 1743, both inclusive, the landlords of this tavern were Messrs. John Reed, Abraham
Daniel Woodward (search for this): chapter 1
isfactory. A careful search of the records and files fail to show that a public house of entertainment was licensed in Medford prior to the year 1690, although from the testimony of Mr. Dunton, there was an ordinary kept in Medford as early as 1686. In the year 1690 the selectmen of Medford addressed the Court of General Sessions of the Peace as follows: The Selectmen of Meadford finding it necessary that there be a House of Entertainment kept in Meadford, have nominated and appointed Daniel Woodward to keep the same and we do present it to this Honored Court believing you would grant him a license. Meadford the 14th, April, 1690, by order of the Selectmen, Nath. Wade. John Hall Jun. The court granted Mr. Woodward a license. Where his house was located we have no means of determining (possibly it was the Willis Tavern). He kept a tavern in Medford one year only; the next year (1691) we find him located in Woburn. The want of a tavern in the town induced the selectmen to again a
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