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Jonathan Wade (search for this): chapter 1
e. In the year 1703 Mr. Richard Rookes was also licensed as an innholder. Mr. Rookes was at this time owner of part of the brick mansion house formerly of Major Jonathan Wade, and his tavern was probably near the present square (perhaps in the brick mansion). He kept a tavern only one year; then from the year 1707 to 718, both inthere is no evidence that either of those parties were ever licensed as tavern keepers. On the highway from Medford bridge to Woburn were the two houses of Major Jonathan Wade (one of which was probably the old Cradock Mansion) and that of Mr. John Bradshaw; nor is there any evidence that these houses were used as taverns. On theid out from the country road to land of Aaron Cleveland; southeast on land of John Hall; southwest on the wharf and dock. The wharf referred to was that of Major Jonathan Wade, and also that of Mr. Matthew Cradock. It was then, as now, at the head of navigation on the Mystic river. The dock was on the easterly side of the wharf
John Stark (search for this): chapter 1
ed until the year 1777. In the year 1778, Mr. Edward Walker took charge of this tavern. He was succeeded by Mr. Benjamin Shaw and others. Mr. James Tufts was licensed as an innholder at the Admiral Vernon in the year 1792, and was its landlord from that year to 1800, both inclusive. At the close of Mr. Tufts' term as landlord, this house became a private dwelling, and so continued until it was destroyed by fire in the year 1850. This house is said to have been the headquarters of Colonel John Stark of the New Hampshire Regiment, in the year 1775, and is supposed to have been the house in which he was chosen colonel of the regiment by a hand vote. (Prior to 1754 this house was in the Town of Charlestown.) The Mystic house. This house is now standing on Main street, and in late years was a part of the Mystic Trotting Park estate. It was built about the year 1847 by Mr. George E. Adams, who at that time owned and improved the Adams farm, and was used until the establishment
Nathaniel Pierce (search for this): chapter 1
ay from Medford to Woburn, and at the foot of Marm Simonds' Hill (this hill was called in the early days of the plantation, Marabels Hill), and as will hereinafter appear, this location is the same as that upon which stood a tavern named at times Pierce's, Usher's and Putnam's Tavern. The evidence to be submitted shows conclusively that upon this lot of land stood a house or houses that were used a good part of the time for over one hundred years as a place of public entertainment. When this huildings thereon in the year 1714 to Mr. Stephen Hall. Mr. Hall sold the same year to Mr. John Richardson, 4th, and Mr. Richardson also sold that same year to Messrs. Joseph and Jabez Sargent. The Messrs. Sargent sold in the year 1717 to Mr. Nathaniel Pierce, taylor and innholder. Who the occupants of this house were during these years is by no means certain. The records of the court fail to show that any person was licensed to keep a public house during the years 1694 and 1695, although it
David Sellick (search for this): chapter 1
r. Matthew Cradock. It was then, as now, at the head of navigation on the Mystic river. The dock was on the easterly side of the wharf and was sometimes called Medford dock. The site of the wharf is now occupied by the brick building of Mr. Bigelow and by the old skating-rink building. The following extract from the printed records of the city of Boston will show the probability that at this wharf vessels were cleared for sea at an early date. Aspinwall Notarial Records. 7 (6) 1648 David Sellick a Bill to pay for vessel Susan 3 £ 5 s. per hund. & Covt. of Lanclet Baker to finish it & mast it & do the joyners work & to beare halfe the vessels chardge till cleared belowe the bridge at Mystick. Also a Bill of sale of 1/2 said vessel from Lanclet Baker to David Selleck: Mr. Willis was granted a license as an innholder in the year 1720, and probably built his house soon after his purchase. He was sometimes called a shopkeeper. He occupied the estate as an innholder until the
Lanclet Baker (search for this): chapter 1
ted records of the city of Boston will show the probability that at this wharf vessels were cleared for sea at an early date. Aspinwall Notarial Records. 7 (6) 1648 David Sellick a Bill to pay for vessel Susan 3 £ 5 s. per hund. & Covt. of Lanclet Baker to finish it & mast it & do the joyners work & to beare halfe the vessels chardge till cleared belowe the bridge at Mystick. Also a Bill of sale of 1/2 said vessel from Lanclet Baker to David Selleck: Mr. Willis was granted a license as Lanclet Baker to David Selleck: Mr. Willis was granted a license as an innholder in the year 1720, and probably built his house soon after his purchase. He was sometimes called a shopkeeper. He occupied the estate as an innholder until the year 1730, when he sold the property to Mr. John Bradshaw, junior, who was the landlord until the year 1740, when he was succeeded by Mrs. Sarah Floyd. In the year 1748 Mr. Bradshaw sold the estate to Mr. Benjamin Floyd. From that date to the year 1759, when it was sold to Mr. Hugh Floyd, the house was kept by Mr. Benjam
John Usher (search for this): chapter 1
ey were much pleased to find that they could obtain their native wine so near their encampment. On their return to camp they told of their discovery, with the result that all of the captured wine was disposed of, to the enjoyment of the Hessians and to the profit of Mr. Porter. The Admiral Vernon Tavern. This tavern stood on the lot of land at the corner of Main and Swan streets, opposite the Central Fire Station, upon land purchased by Mr. Aaron Cleveland in the year 1717 of the Hon. John Usher. It was a part of Gov. Winthrop's Ten Hills Farm. As Mr. Cleveland was granted an innholder's license in the year 1720, this house must have been built prior to that date. Mr. Cleveland was the landlord of this tavern from the year 1720 to 1738, both inclusive. In the latter year he sold the estate to Colonel Isaac Royall, senior. After the death of Colonel Royall in the year 1739, his son, Colonel Isaac Royall, junior, came into possession of the property. From the year 1739 to
f the cellar wall of the building on the inside will show that the grade of the street has been raised all of three feet in front of the house. I remember the time when four or five steps were necessary to enter the grocery store now occupied by Yerxa & Yerxa. Mr. Bigelow also related the following story in connection with the Royal Oak Tavern and its landlord, Mr. Jonathan Porter:— During the early years of the War of the Revolution, an English vessel was captured by an American privYerxa. Mr. Bigelow also related the following story in connection with the Royal Oak Tavern and its landlord, Mr. Jonathan Porter:— During the early years of the War of the Revolution, an English vessel was captured by an American privateer, and the vessel and cargo was brought into the port of Boston and sold. A portion of the cargo consisted of Rhine wine, and as there was but little if any demand for such wine in Boston and vicinity, it was bought by Mr. Porter for a trifling sum and brought to Medford and stored in the cellar of the Royal Oak Tavern. After the surrender of General Burgoyne at Saratoga, the captured Hessians were sent to Boston and encamped in the vicinity. The officers were paroled and allowed the l
April 19th, 1775 AD (search for this): chapter 1
or. In the upper portion of this sign is a bullet hole, and on the side opposite from which the bullet entered, a piece of the sign is slivered off. The angle of the hole through the sign would seem to indicate that the bullet was fired from above the level of the sign, unless the sign was swinging at the time the shot was fired. There is a tradition that this hole was caused by a bullet, shot from the musket of one of the Minute Men on the return of the Medford Company from Lexington, April 19, 1775. (For further description of the sign see illustration.) The late Mr. Francis Bigelow was authority for the following incident in connection with the house now standing on the corner of Riverside avenue and Main street. At the time that Mr. Jonathan Porter took down the old Royal Oak Tavern and built the house above referred to, Mr. Benjamin Hall was confined to his house by sickness. Mr. Hall's house was so situated that his window overlooked the market-place, and he was much inte
ns acquired a justly high reputation for their excellent accommodations even as early as the year 1686. Mr. John Dunton, who visited Medford in that year, says: took Sanctuary in a Public, where th690, although from the testimony of Mr. Dunton, there was an ordinary kept in Medford as early as 1686. In the year 1690 the selectmen of Medford addressed the Court of General Sessions of the Peace this house was built we have no means of knowing. Very likely it was built as early as the year 1686, and may have been the house at which Mr. Dunton was entertained in that year. Mr. Willis sold telieve that the house of Mr. Willis was the house at which Mr. Dunton was entertained in the year 1686. At that date there were but three great highways leading through Medford, viz.: the highway now All the evidence tends to show the probability that the Willis' house was standing in the year 1686. This estate passed from the ownership of the Peirce heirs into that of Mr. William Willis. Mr.
oncerning the early tavern keepers of Medford, and these sources of information are far from being satisfactory. A careful search of the records and files fail to show that a public house of entertainment was licensed in Medford prior to the year 1690, although from the testimony of Mr. Dunton, there was an ordinary kept in Medford as early as 1686. In the year 1690 the selectmen of Medford addressed the Court of General Sessions of the Peace as follows: The Selectmen of Meadford finding it ne1690 the selectmen of Medford addressed the Court of General Sessions of the Peace as follows: The Selectmen of Meadford finding it necessary that there be a House of Entertainment kept in Meadford, have nominated and appointed Daniel Woodward to keep the same and we do present it to this Honored Court believing you would grant him a license. Meadford the 14th, April, 1690, by order of the Selectmen, Nath. Wade. John Hall Jun. The court granted Mr. Woodward a license. Where his house was located we have no means of determining (possibly it was the Willis Tavern). He kept a tavern in Medford one year only; the next year (16
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