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New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 1
The taverns of Medford. by John H. Hooper. [Read before the Medford Historical Society, November 21, 1904.] Zzz. for many years the most direct route of land travel from northern and eastern New England to Boston was through the town of Medford and over Mystic bridge. This large amount of travel required more tavern accommodaions than were usual to a place of size and importance of the town of Medford. We accordingly find houses for the entertainment of man and beast located on all of our principal thoroughfares, on the roads from Medford to Woburn, from Medford to Malden, and on the great road to Charlestown, also in the market-place. Medford taverns acquired a justly high reputation for their excellent accommodations even as early as the year 1686. Mr. John Dunton, who visited Medford in that year, says: took Sanctuary in a Public, where there was extraordinary good Cyder, and thoa I had n't such a Noble Treat as at Captain Jenner's, yet with the Cyder and such othe
Marble Brook (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
erson to be licensed to retail beer, Ale, Rum, Syder &c. and to keep a House of Public Entertainment for the use of the town and strangers dated 18 day of July 1692. from your Worships humble servants, Nath. Wade, Stephen Willis, John Whitmore, Selectmen of Meadford. Mr. Willis was again granted a license. The next year (1693) we find Mr. Willis again licensed. Where the Willis Tavern was located we can only conjecture by the following: Mr. Willis owned land a short distance west of Marble brook, on the north side of the way from Medford to Woburn, and at the foot of Marm Simonds' Hill (this hill was called in the early days of the plantation, Marabels Hill), and as will hereinafter appear, this location is the same as that upon which stood a tavern named at times Pierce's, Usher's and Putnam's Tavern. The evidence to be submitted shows conclusively that upon this lot of land stood a house or houses that were used a good part of the time for over one hundred years as a place of
Middlesex County (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
was required to furnish a bond with sureties for the faithful observance of the law. The form of such license was as follows: A. B. is permitted to sell liquors unto such sober-minded neighbors as he shall think meet, so as he sell not less than the quantity of a gallon at a time to one person, and not in smaller quantities by retail to the occasioning of drunkenness. The names of these licensed persons may be found in the court records and files in the office of the Clerk of Courts of Middlesex county. It is to these court records and files that we are obliged to look for information concerning the early tavern keepers of Medford, and these sources of information are far from being satisfactory. A careful search of the records and files fail to show that a public house of entertainment was licensed in Medford prior to the year 1690, although from the testimony of Mr. Dunton, there was an ordinary kept in Medford as early as 1686. In the year 1690 the selectmen of Medford addressed
Mystic, Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
The taverns of Medford. by John H. Hooper. [Read before the Medford Historical Society, November 21, 1904.] Zzz. for many years the most direct route of land travel from northern and eastern New England to Boston was through the town of Medford and over Mystic bridge. This large amount of travel required more tavern accommodaions than were usual to a place of size and importance of the town of Medford. We accordingly find houses for the entertainment of man and beast located on all of our principal thoroughfares, on the roads from Medford to Woburn, from Medford to Malden, and on the great road to Charlestown, also in the market-place. Medford taverns acquired a justly high reputation for their excellent accommodations even as early as the year 1686. Mr. John Dunton, who visited Medford in that year, says: took Sanctuary in a Public, where there was extraordinary good Cyder, and thoa I had n't such a Noble Treat as at Captain Jenner's, yet with the Cyder and such othe
Roxbury, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
used as a tavern during his ownership. Mr. John Bradshaw, in the first part of the year 1750, kept the Admiral Vernon Tavern in Charlestown. He removed to Medford and was licensed as an innholder the latter part of that year, and in the years 1751-52-53. He died in the year 1753, and his widow, Mercy Bradshaw, was licensed for the remainder of the year, and the record reads that she occupied the house formerly of Mr. William Willis. Mr. Reaves sold in the year 1784 to Mr. Abijah Usher of Roxbury. In 1792 Mr. Robert Usher was licensed as an innholder and kept this tavern. He was succeeded by Messrs. Abijah Usher, Eleazer Usher, Wyman Weston, Ebenezer Putnam and others. The estate passed from the ownership of Mr. Usher, and through many different persons down to the present day; it is now in the possession of Mr. F. E. Chandler. This estate has been aptly described as a well chosen location for a place of entertainment for tired horses and thirsty men, at the foot of that sharp
Mystick River (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 1
stood upon land purchased of Dr. Oliver Noyes by Mr. Benjamin Willis in the year 1717. The estate was described as a house lot near Medford bridge, bounded west and northwest on the country road; northeast on a highway laid out from the country road to land of Aaron Cleveland; southeast on land of John Hall; southwest on the wharf and dock. The wharf referred to was that of Major Jonathan Wade, and also that of Mr. Matthew Cradock. It was then, as now, at the head of navigation on the Mystic river. The dock was on the easterly side of the wharf and was sometimes called Medford dock. The site of the wharf is now occupied by the brick building of Mr. Bigelow and by the old skating-rink building. The following extract from the printed records of the city of Boston will show the probability that at this wharf vessels were cleared for sea at an early date. Aspinwall Notarial Records. 7 (6) 1648 David Sellick a Bill to pay for vessel Susan 3 £ 5 s. per hund. & Covt. of Lanclet Bake
George E. Adams (search for this): chapter 1
destroyed by fire in the year 1850. This house is said to have been the headquarters of Colonel John Stark of the New Hampshire Regiment, in the year 1775, and is supposed to have been the house in which he was chosen colonel of the regiment by a hand vote. (Prior to 1754 this house was in the Town of Charlestown.) The Mystic house. This house is now standing on Main street, and in late years was a part of the Mystic Trotting Park estate. It was built about the year 1847 by Mr. George E. Adams, who at that time owned and improved the Adams farm, and was used until the establishment of Mystic Trotting Park as a private dwelling. It cannot properly be classed among the taverns of Medford, although the Park proprietors were licensed as innholders. Meads Tavern. In the year 1758, Mr. Thomas Seccomb sold the estate upon which the City Hall stands to Mr. Israel Mead. Mr. Mead was licensed as an innholder from the year 1759 to the year 1762, both inclusive, and no doubt kep
Benjamin Willis (search for this): chapter 1
late Mr. Rufus Sawyer took down the old building and erected on its site the house now standing on the easterly corner of Salem and Fountain streets. The Royal Oak Tavern. This tavern stood upon land purchased of Dr. Oliver Noyes by Mr. Benjamin Willis in the year 1717. The estate was described as a house lot near Medford bridge, bounded west and northwest on the country road; northeast on a highway laid out from the country road to land of Aaron Cleveland; southeast on land of John Hals. per hund. & Covt. of Lanclet Baker to finish it & mast it & do the joyners work & to beare halfe the vessels chardge till cleared belowe the bridge at Mystick. Also a Bill of sale of 1/2 said vessel from Lanclet Baker to David Selleck: Mr. Willis was granted a license as an innholder in the year 1720, and probably built his house soon after his purchase. He was sometimes called a shopkeeper. He occupied the estate as an innholder until the year 1730, when he sold the property to Mr. J
John H. Hooper (search for this): chapter 1
The taverns of Medford. by John H. Hooper. [Read before the Medford Historical Society, November 21, 1904.] Zzz. for many years the most direct route of land travel from northern and eastern New England to Boston was through the town of Medford and over Mystic bridge. This large amount of travel required more tavern accommodaions than were usual to a place of size and importance of the town of Medford. We accordingly find houses for the entertainment of man and beast located on all of our principal thoroughfares, on the roads from Medford to Woburn, from Medford to Malden, and on the great road to Charlestown, also in the market-place. Medford taverns acquired a justly high reputation for their excellent accommodations even as early as the year 1686. Mr. John Dunton, who visited Medford in that year, says: took Sanctuary in a Public, where there was extraordinary good Cyder, and thoa I had n't such a Noble Treat as at Captain Jenner's, yet with the Cyder and such other
Richard Rookes (search for this): chapter 1
Hall licensed in the years 1696 and 1700 was Mr. Hall, senior. Mr. Hall died in October, 1701, and from the year 1702 to 1706, both inclusive, Mr. John Hall (son of John Hall, senior), was granted an innholder's license. In the year 1703 Mr. Richard Rookes was also licensed as an innholder. Mr. Rookes was at this time owner of part of the brick mansion house formerly of Major Jonathan Wade, and his tavern was probably near the present square (perhaps in the brick mansion). He kept a tavern oMr. Rookes was at this time owner of part of the brick mansion house formerly of Major Jonathan Wade, and his tavern was probably near the present square (perhaps in the brick mansion). He kept a tavern only one year; then from the year 1707 to 718, both inclusive, Mr. Nathaniel Peirce was licensed as an innholder. Mr. Peirce, as has been before stated, bought the estate in the year 1717. He died in the year 1719, and in that year and in the years 1720 and 1721, and also in the year 1726, his widow, Mrs. Lydia Peirce, received an nnholder's license. Up to this date I have been particular to give in detail the names of those parties who were granted licenses as innholders, etc., for the reaso
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