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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 8.. Search the whole document.

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Abraham Skinner (search for this): chapter 1
granted an innholder's license in the year 1720, this house must have been built prior to that date. Mr. Cleveland was the landlord of this tavern from the year 1720 to 1738, both inclusive. In the latter year he sold the estate to Colonel Isaac Royall, senior. After the death of Colonel Royall in the year 1739, his son, Colonel Isaac Royall, junior, came into possession of the property. From the year 1739 to 1743, both inclusive, the landlords of this tavern were Messrs. John Reed, Abraham Skinner, and Captain Samuel Wade. Under date of December 26, 1743, Colonel Royall advertised as follows: any person beforehanded so as to lay in a good stock of liquors and other necessaries for a Tavern, may meet with proper encouragement from Isaac Royall Esq. (from Brooks' History of Medford.) This advertisement was answered by Mr. John Bradshaw, who was a few years prior to this date the owner and landlord of the Royal Oak Tavern. Mr. Bradshaw was landlord of the Admiral Vernon from the y
Eleazer Usher (search for this): chapter 1
at she occupied the house formerly of Mr. William Willis. Mr. Reaves sold in the year 1784 to Mr. Abijah Usher of Roxbury. In 1792 Mr. Robert Usher was licensed as an innholder and kept this tavern. He was succeeded by Messrs. Abijah Usher, Eleazer Usher, Wyman Weston, Ebenezer Putnam and others. The estate passed from the ownership of Mr. Usher, and through many different persons down to the present day; it is now in the possession of Mr. F. E. Chandler. This estate has been aptly descriMr. Usher, and through many different persons down to the present day; it is now in the possession of Mr. F. E. Chandler. This estate has been aptly described as a well chosen location for a place of entertainment for tired horses and thirsty men, at the foot of that sharp rise in the road known as Marm Simonds' Hill. A contemporary further described this house as a groggy old hole. The Fountain Tavern. Under the date of April 29, 1702, Mr. Peter Seccomb of Medford, bought of Mr. John Bradstreet, two and one-half acres of land bounded northeast and east on the road into Charlestown woodlots; southerly on the road from Malden to Charles
that were used a good part of the time for over one hundred years as a place of public entertainment. When this house was built we have no means of knowing. Very likely it was built as early as the year 1686, and may have been the house at which Mr. Dunton was entertained in that year. Mr. Willis sold this lot of land with the buildings thereon in the year 1714 to Mr. Stephen Hall. Mr. Hall sold the same year to Mr. John Richardson, 4th, and Mr. Richardson also sold that same year to Messrs. Joseph and Jabez Sargent. The Messrs. Sargent sold in the year 1717 to Mr. Nathaniel Pierce, taylor and innholder. Who the occupants of this house were during these years is by no means certain. The records of the court fail to show that any person was licensed to keep a public house during the years 1694 and 1695, although it is probable that licenses were granted. In the year 1696 Mr. John Hall was licensed to keep a public house, and in the years 1697-8 and 9 Mr. Stephen Hall was licens
Lydia Peirce (search for this): chapter 1
t this time owner of part of the brick mansion house formerly of Major Jonathan Wade, and his tavern was probably near the present square (perhaps in the brick mansion). He kept a tavern only one year; then from the year 1707 to 718, both inclusive, Mr. Nathaniel Peirce was licensed as an innholder. Mr. Peirce, as has been before stated, bought the estate in the year 1717. He died in the year 1719, and in that year and in the years 1720 and 1721, and also in the year 1726, his widow, Mrs. Lydia Peirce, received an nnholder's license. Up to this date I have been particular to give in detail the names of those parties who were granted licenses as innholders, etc., for the reason that this house appears to have been the first, and for many years the only, public house (excepting the Rookes' house) in the town of Medford, and these names appearing in such regular order, leads to the belief that they may have been occupants of this house. The Peirces were located here without doubt,
John Whitmore (search for this): chapter 1
n addressed the court. To the Hon. Justices of the Peace at the Sessions holden 19th. July instant in Charlestown, by the virtue of a warrant from Mr. Samuel Phipps, Clerk, dated July 7. 1692 the Selectmen doe approve of Mr. Thomas Willis and judge him a meet person to be licensed to retail beer, Ale, Rum, Syder &c. and to keep a House of Public Entertainment for the use of the town and strangers dated 18 day of July 1692. from your Worships humble servants, Nath. Wade, Stephen Willis, John Whitmore, Selectmen of Meadford. Mr. Willis was again granted a license. The next year (1693) we find Mr. Willis again licensed. Where the Willis Tavern was located we can only conjecture by the following: Mr. Willis owned land a short distance west of Marble brook, on the north side of the way from Medford to Woburn, and at the foot of Marm Simonds' Hill (this hill was called in the early days of the plantation, Marabels Hill), and as will hereinafter appear, this location is the same as th
Timothy Wheeler (search for this): chapter 1
s now consider what evidence there is to authorize us to believe that the house of Mr. Willis was the house at which Mr. Dunton was entertained in the year 1686. At that date there were but three great highways leading through Medford, viz.: the highway now known as Grove street, the highway from Medford bridge to Woburn (part of High street and all of Woburn street) and the Highway to Malden (Salem street). So far as we know the house of Mr. Caleb Brooks, and possibly the house of Captain Timothy Wheeler, afterwards that of Mr. Ebenezer Prout, and still later that of Messrs. John and Stephen Francis, were the only houses on the first named highway at that date, and there is no evidence that either of those parties were ever licensed as tavern keepers. On the highway from Medford bridge to Woburn were the two houses of Major Jonathan Wade (one of which was probably the old Cradock Mansion) and that of Mr. John Bradshaw; nor is there any evidence that these houses were used as tavern
Benjamin Hall (search for this): chapter 1
authority for the following incident in connection with the house now standing on the corner of Riverside avenue and Main street. At the time that Mr. Jonathan Porter took down the old Royal Oak Tavern and built the house above referred to, Mr. Benjamin Hall was confined to his house by sickness. Mr. Hall's house was so situated that his window overlooked the market-place, and he was much interested in watching the progress of the building. All at once an idea occurred to him; calling his maMr. Hall's house was so situated that his window overlooked the market-place, and he was much interested in watching the progress of the building. All at once an idea occurred to him; calling his man, he told him to go and find Mr. Porter and tell him that he had better set his house up a good height, as the marketplace was low, and that in all probability the grade would be raised. Mr. Porter heeded the suggestion and set his building on a high underpinning. An inspection of the cellar wall of the building on the inside will show that the grade of the street has been raised all of three feet in front of the house. I remember the time when four or five steps were necessary to enter the
Benjamin Shaw (search for this): chapter 1
te the owner and landlord of the Royal Oak Tavern. Mr. Bradshaw was landlord of the Admiral Vernon from the year 1744 to about the middle of the year 1750, when he removed back to Medford. He was succeeded by Messrs. William Peirce, William Jones, and others. In the year 1768 Mr. Moses Billings was licensed as an innholder and took charge of the Admiral Vernon, where he remained until the year 1777. In the year 1778, Mr. Edward Walker took charge of this tavern. He was succeeded by Mr. Benjamin Shaw and others. Mr. James Tufts was licensed as an innholder at the Admiral Vernon in the year 1792, and was its landlord from that year to 1800, both inclusive. At the close of Mr. Tufts' term as landlord, this house became a private dwelling, and so continued until it was destroyed by fire in the year 1850. This house is said to have been the headquarters of Colonel John Stark of the New Hampshire Regiment, in the year 1775, and is supposed to have been the house in which he was chos
Ebenezer Prout (search for this): chapter 1
authorize us to believe that the house of Mr. Willis was the house at which Mr. Dunton was entertained in the year 1686. At that date there were but three great highways leading through Medford, viz.: the highway now known as Grove street, the highway from Medford bridge to Woburn (part of High street and all of Woburn street) and the Highway to Malden (Salem street). So far as we know the house of Mr. Caleb Brooks, and possibly the house of Captain Timothy Wheeler, afterwards that of Mr. Ebenezer Prout, and still later that of Messrs. John and Stephen Francis, were the only houses on the first named highway at that date, and there is no evidence that either of those parties were ever licensed as tavern keepers. On the highway from Medford bridge to Woburn were the two houses of Major Jonathan Wade (one of which was probably the old Cradock Mansion) and that of Mr. John Bradshaw; nor is there any evidence that these houses were used as taverns. On the highway to Malden there was but
John Bradshaw (search for this): chapter 1
ne of which was probably the old Cradock Mansion) and that of Mr. John Bradshaw; nor is there any evidence that these houses were used as tavce that the house was used as a tavern during his ownership. Mr. John Bradshaw, in the first part of the year 1750, kept the Admiral Vernon years 1751-52-53. He died in the year 1753, and his widow, Mercy Bradshaw, was licensed for the remainder of the year, and the record reads nholder until the year 1730, when he sold the property to Mr. John Bradshaw, junior, who was the landlord until the year 1740, when he was succeeded by Mrs. Sarah Floyd. In the year 1748 Mr. Bradshaw sold the estate to Mr. Benjamin Floyd. From that date to the year 1759, when it wooks' History of Medford.) This advertisement was answered by Mr. John Bradshaw, who was a few years prior to this date the owner and landlord of the Royal Oak Tavern. Mr. Bradshaw was landlord of the Admiral Vernon from the year 1744 to about the middle of the year 1750, when he re
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