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Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
It is worthy of note and showed his characteristic persistence, that he persuaded one of his boyhood friends who had left college on account of ill health to return and finish his course. Mr. Brown taught school in the long winter vacations to earn money for his expenses, and after graduating from college he taught two and a half years as principal of high schools, first at South Abington, now Whitman, and then at Stoneham, Mass. He was a clerk in the quartermaster's department at Nashville, Tennessee, in 1864 and 1865. On returning to Boston, he entered the educational department of Taggard & Thompson, publishers and stationers. On the retirement of Mr. Taggard, in 1869, he became a member of the firm, and continued the business, the firm name soon becoming Thompson, Brown & Co. Among the most noted books which bore their imprint, were Cushing's Manual of Parliamentary Practice, Eaton & Bradbury's Mathematical Series, and Meservey's Book-keeping. At his death, he was one of t
Marblehead (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
. He was the second son of Joseph and Elvira (Howard) Brown, and was descended from many of the founders of New England, among whom were, on the paternal side, Rev. Stephen Bachiler, Thomas Webster, Hon. Samuel Dalton and other founders of Hampton, New Hampshire, and Hon. John Gilman, of Exeter, New Hampshire, and, on the maternal side, Gov. Thomas Hinckley, of the Plymouth Colony, Rev. John Mayo, first pastor of the Second Church of Boston, and Rev. William Walton, one of the founders of Marblehead. Born on a New Hampshire farm in the first half of the last century, he knew from experience what a life of plain living and high thinking was. His mother was ambitious that her boys should have a good education, and although she died when her son David was fourteen, her wish had been impressed on her children, three of whom went to college. After leaving the district school in Raymond, Mr. Brown attended Hampton, New Hampshire, Academy in the fall of 1853, and then went to Phillips
Hampton, N. H. (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
He was the second son of Joseph and Elvira (Howard) Brown, and was descended from many of the founders of New England, among whom were, on the paternal side, Rev. Stephen Bachiler, Thomas Webster, Hon. Samuel Dalton and other founders of Hampton, New Hampshire, and Hon. John Gilman, of Exeter, New Hampshire, and, on the maternal side, Gov. Thomas Hinckley, of the Plymouth Colony, Rev. John Mayo, first pastor of the Second Church of Boston, and Rev. William Walton, one of the founders of Marbleh her boys should have a good education, and although she died when her son David was fourteen, her wish had been impressed on her children, three of whom went to college. After leaving the district school in Raymond, Mr. Brown attended Hampton, New Hampshire, Academy in the fall of 1853, and then went to Phillips Andover Academy to fit for college. He entered Dartmouth in the fall of 1857, graduating in 1861, in the same class with President Tucker. It is worthy of note and showed his chara
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 10
n. David Henry Brown was born in Raymond, New Hampshire, August 17, 1836, and died at his home in West Medford, on February 21, 1908. He was the second son of Joseph and Elvira (Howard) Brown, and was descended from many of the founders of New England, among whom were, on the paternal side, Rev. Stephen Bachiler, Thomas Webster, Hon. Samuel Dalton and other founders of Hampton, New Hampshire, and Hon. John Gilman, of Exeter, New Hampshire, and, on the maternal side, Gov. Thomas Hinckley, of from whom he was descended, has been commended as a model genealogical sketch. For the Old Home Week celebration of his native town, Raymond, New Hampshire, in 1901, Mr. Brown wrote some delightful reminiscences, giving a vivid picture of New England country life sixty years ago. From the organization of the Medford Historical Society, in which he took an active part, to the day of his death, his work for it and his interest in it never ceased. He was always willing to do whatever need
Stoneham (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
of 1857, graduating in 1861, in the same class with President Tucker. It is worthy of note and showed his characteristic persistence, that he persuaded one of his boyhood friends who had left college on account of ill health to return and finish his course. Mr. Brown taught school in the long winter vacations to earn money for his expenses, and after graduating from college he taught two and a half years as principal of high schools, first at South Abington, now Whitman, and then at Stoneham, Mass. He was a clerk in the quartermaster's department at Nashville, Tennessee, in 1864 and 1865. On returning to Boston, he entered the educational department of Taggard & Thompson, publishers and stationers. On the retirement of Mr. Taggard, in 1869, he became a member of the firm, and continued the business, the firm name soon becoming Thompson, Brown & Co. Among the most noted books which bore their imprint, were Cushing's Manual of Parliamentary Practice, Eaton & Bradbury's Mathematica
Cleveland (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
ntry, and his firm, through all the vicissitudes of business and of keen competition, bore a reputation for honorable dealings. In 1869 Mr. Brown married Abby Dudley Tucker, daughter of General Henry and Nancy (Dudley) Tucker, of Raymond, New Hampshire, a lineal descendant of Gov. Thomas Dudley, of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. He is survived by his wife and three sons, Henry Tucker Brown, of New York City, Howard Dudley Brown, of Arlington, Massachusetts, and Edward Bangs Brown, of Cleveland, Ohio, and two grandchildren, Elizabeth, daughter of his son Howard, and Barbara, daughter of his son Edward. In 1871 Mr. Brown came to Medford to live in the house on Allston street, which was ever after his home. West Medford was then a little village, with no church and only some twenty-five houses on the west of the railroad. Many changes took place in the thirty-seven years of his residence here, and he took a prominent and active part in all that promoted the welfare of the communi
New Hampshire (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
Joseph and Elvira (Howard) Brown, and was descended from many of the founders of New England, among whom were, on the paternal side, Rev. Stephen Bachiler, Thomas Webster, Hon. Samuel Dalton and other founders of Hampton, New Hampshire, and Hon. John Gilman, of Exeter, New Hampshire, and, on the maternal side, Gov. Thomas Hinckley, of the Plymouth Colony, Rev. John Mayo, first pastor of the Second Church of Boston, and Rev. William Walton, one of the founders of Marblehead. Born on a New Hampshire farm in the first half of the last century, he knew from experience what a life of plain living and high thinking was. His mother was ambitious that her boys should have a good education, and although she died when her son David was fourteen, her wish had been impressed on her children, three of whom went to college. After leaving the district school in Raymond, Mr. Brown attended Hampton, New Hampshire, Academy in the fall of 1853, and then went to Phillips Andover Academy to fit for
Whitman (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
college. He entered Dartmouth in the fall of 1857, graduating in 1861, in the same class with President Tucker. It is worthy of note and showed his characteristic persistence, that he persuaded one of his boyhood friends who had left college on account of ill health to return and finish his course. Mr. Brown taught school in the long winter vacations to earn money for his expenses, and after graduating from college he taught two and a half years as principal of high schools, first at South Abington, now Whitman, and then at Stoneham, Mass. He was a clerk in the quartermaster's department at Nashville, Tennessee, in 1864 and 1865. On returning to Boston, he entered the educational department of Taggard & Thompson, publishers and stationers. On the retirement of Mr. Taggard, in 1869, he became a member of the firm, and continued the business, the firm name soon becoming Thompson, Brown & Co. Among the most noted books which bore their imprint, were Cushing's Manual of Parliamentary
Menotomy (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
h, he was one of the oldest publishers in the country, and his firm, through all the vicissitudes of business and of keen competition, bore a reputation for honorable dealings. In 1869 Mr. Brown married Abby Dudley Tucker, daughter of General Henry and Nancy (Dudley) Tucker, of Raymond, New Hampshire, a lineal descendant of Gov. Thomas Dudley, of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. He is survived by his wife and three sons, Henry Tucker Brown, of New York City, Howard Dudley Brown, of Arlington, Massachusetts, and Edward Bangs Brown, of Cleveland, Ohio, and two grandchildren, Elizabeth, daughter of his son Howard, and Barbara, daughter of his son Edward. In 1871 Mr. Brown came to Medford to live in the house on Allston street, which was ever after his home. West Medford was then a little village, with no church and only some twenty-five houses on the west of the railroad. Many changes took place in the thirty-seven years of his residence here, and he took a prominent and active part
Raymond (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 10
David Henry Brown. David Henry Brown was born in Raymond, New Hampshire, August 17, 1836, and died at his home in West Medford, on February 21, 1908. He was the second son of Joseph and Elvira (Howard) Brown, and was descended from many of the founders of New England, among whom were, on the paternal side, Rev. Stephen Bachitition, bore a reputation for honorable dealings. In 1869 Mr. Brown married Abby Dudley Tucker, daughter of General Henry and Nancy (Dudley) Tucker, of Raymond, New Hampshire, a lineal descendant of Gov. Thomas Dudley, of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. He is survived by his wife and three sons, Henry Tucker Brown, of New York Cn and Joan Stone, from whom he was descended, has been commended as a model genealogical sketch. For the Old Home Week celebration of his native town, Raymond, New Hampshire, in 1901, Mr. Brown wrote some delightful reminiscences, giving a vivid picture of New England country life sixty years ago. From the organization of t
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