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Taunton (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
Harvard College in 1814, studied theology there, and subsequently in Edinburgh. Two previous ministries were in Eastport, Maine, and in Gloucester, Mass. He was a man of scholarly tastes and pursuits, rather fond of classical quotations in his sermons. His library, inherited in part from his father, contained books in many languages, showing especially his fondness for classical learning. His reputation as a preacher could not have been great, as after a brief ministry in Washington and Taunton, he became associated with the Boston Benevolent Fraternity of Churches, living in Boston afterward on the comfortable property inherited from his father. He was a wide traveller and published two volumes of his travels in the East. Mr. Caleb Stetson, a graduate of Harvard College, was unanimously chosen as the successor of Mr. Bigelow, in January, 1827, and was ordained to the ministry over this church and parish in February. His service covered a period of twenty-one years, ending i
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
Francis, of Watertown, brother of Lydia Maria Child, subsequently a professor in the Divinity School of Harvard College. His first Sunday as a legal minister of the town was July 13, 1823. But the narrow majority of 25 was a clear indication of much dissatisfaction at his choice, like the rote of the sea which foretells a storm. Mr. Bigelow was known to belong to the school of thought in Congregationalism which was called Liberal, and by this time, owing to Channing's outspoken word at Baltimore, and to the drift of events in many an ancient parish, the word was known to be a mild way of saying he was a Unitarian. It was because this was understood that there was so strong a minority against him in the vote that elected him as pastor. Of this he was fully informed, which leads him to say in his acceptance of the call in a letter to the town, After a painful view of the subject, and a strong internal conflict my conclusion is to accept the invitation. In the time that elapsed be
Watertown (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
ndicating the weight of influence on the liberal side of the old Congregational order, as it was then known and spoken of. They are President Kirkland of Harvard College, Dr. Abiel Holmes, of Cambridge, the father of Oliver Wendell Holmes, Dr. Charles Lowell, of Boston, father of James Russell Lowell, and himself a man of note in his day as pastor of the West Church, Rev. Francis Parkman, Rev. James Walker of Charlestown, afterward President of Harvard College, and Rev. Convers Francis, of Watertown, brother of Lydia Maria Child, subsequently a professor in the Divinity School of Harvard College. His first Sunday as a legal minister of the town was July 13, 1823. But the narrow majority of 25 was a clear indication of much dissatisfaction at his choice, like the rote of the sea which foretells a storm. Mr. Bigelow was known to belong to the school of thought in Congregationalism which was called Liberal, and by this time, owing to Channing's outspoken word at Baltimore, and to the
Lowell (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
in which he won the victory. As a preacher he was a man of commanding presence, with gifts of oratory that made him widely known. His voice was rich, and finely modulated, and there are those still living who in their youth remember his reading of hymns and scripture as something that uplifted them. He was followed in 1857 by Rev. Theodore Tebbetts, under whose care the church and parish seemed entering upon brighter prospects. But ill-health, which had forced him to resign his work at Lowell, returned after about two years of his ministry here, though he continued as minister till July, 1860. His was a name I often heard when I first came to the parish. He was deeply and tenderly beloved. The parish was very kind and generous to him, supplying the pulpit at its own charge during his long illness. Indeed there is nothing in the history I have been reviewing which has impressed me more profoundly than that of the friendly relations between Mr. Tebbetts and this parish. He be
Glocester (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
to do with his brief ministry of less than four years. Mr. Bigelow was well known, having spent his later youth here. His father, Hon. Timothy Bigelow, a lawyer of eminence, came to Medford in 1808, and as his son Andrew afterward became the minister of the town, it was an instance of a prophet having honor in his own country. He was graduated from Harvard College in 1814, studied theology there, and subsequently in Edinburgh. Two previous ministries were in Eastport, Maine, and in Gloucester, Mass. He was a man of scholarly tastes and pursuits, rather fond of classical quotations in his sermons. His library, inherited in part from his father, contained books in many languages, showing especially his fondness for classical learning. His reputation as a preacher could not have been great, as after a brief ministry in Washington and Taunton, he became associated with the Boston Benevolent Fraternity of Churches, living in Boston afterward on the comfortable property inherited fro
Eastport (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 16
him. It may have had much to do with his brief ministry of less than four years. Mr. Bigelow was well known, having spent his later youth here. His father, Hon. Timothy Bigelow, a lawyer of eminence, came to Medford in 1808, and as his son Andrew afterward became the minister of the town, it was an instance of a prophet having honor in his own country. He was graduated from Harvard College in 1814, studied theology there, and subsequently in Edinburgh. Two previous ministries were in Eastport, Maine, and in Gloucester, Mass. He was a man of scholarly tastes and pursuits, rather fond of classical quotations in his sermons. His library, inherited in part from his father, contained books in many languages, showing especially his fondness for classical learning. His reputation as a preacher could not have been great, as after a brief ministry in Washington and Taunton, he became associated with the Boston Benevolent Fraternity of Churches, living in Boston afterward on the comfortab
nd never before existing, that the connection could be dissolved by either party by giving six months notice, a rule which has since continued whenever a minister was chosen. July 9, the ecclesiastical council, invited by the church and town, met to install Mr. Bigelow as pastor. Some names of clergymen composing the council are worthy of remembrance as indicating the weight of influence on the liberal side of the old Congregational order, as it was then known and spoken of. They are President Kirkland of Harvard College, Dr. Abiel Holmes, of Cambridge, the father of Oliver Wendell Holmes, Dr. Charles Lowell, of Boston, father of James Russell Lowell, and himself a man of note in his day as pastor of the West Church, Rev. Francis Parkman, Rev. James Walker of Charlestown, afterward President of Harvard College, and Rev. Convers Francis, of Watertown, brother of Lydia Maria Child, subsequently a professor in the Divinity School of Harvard College. His first Sunday as a legal ministe
Convers Francis (search for this): chapter 16
of remembrance as indicating the weight of influence on the liberal side of the old Congregational order, as it was then known and spoken of. They are President Kirkland of Harvard College, Dr. Abiel Holmes, of Cambridge, the father of Oliver Wendell Holmes, Dr. Charles Lowell, of Boston, father of James Russell Lowell, and himself a man of note in his day as pastor of the West Church, Rev. Francis Parkman, Rev. James Walker of Charlestown, afterward President of Harvard College, and Rev. Convers Francis, of Watertown, brother of Lydia Maria Child, subsequently a professor in the Divinity School of Harvard College. His first Sunday as a legal minister of the town was July 13, 1823. But the narrow majority of 25 was a clear indication of much dissatisfaction at his choice, like the rote of the sea which foretells a storm. Mr. Bigelow was known to belong to the school of thought in Congregationalism which was called Liberal, and by this time, owing to Channing's outspoken word at Ba
Woodbridge (search for this): chapter 16
nd bound on an eventful but dubious voyage, set sail under the command of your humble servant bound for Jerusalem, but not to the city which sits solitary and in sackcloth amid the desolations of a land once fair as the garden of the Lord, but to Jerusalem which is above and free, the mother of us all. The ship which I sail was constructed by no modern architect. She was built by hands that long ago moldered into dust: and she has since outrode the tides of four successive generations. Woodbridge and Porter, and Turell and Osgood have each at intervals commanded her,—the last a navigator of preeminent experience. Since his recall, this gallant bark was suffered to lie for a season amid conflicting currents, the sport of winds and waves, and the injuries she sustained, there is reason to fear will never be effectually repaired. After a partial refitting she was commissioned anew and entrusted to my charge. Wednesday, the 9th inst. was appointed for the issuing of instructions. T
ut dubious voyage, set sail under the command of your humble servant bound for Jerusalem, but not to the city which sits solitary and in sackcloth amid the desolations of a land once fair as the garden of the Lord, but to Jerusalem which is above and free, the mother of us all. The ship which I sail was constructed by no modern architect. She was built by hands that long ago moldered into dust: and she has since outrode the tides of four successive generations. Woodbridge and Porter, and Turell and Osgood have each at intervals commanded her,—the last a navigator of preeminent experience. Since his recall, this gallant bark was suffered to lie for a season amid conflicting currents, the sport of winds and waves, and the injuries she sustained, there is reason to fear will never be effectually repaired. After a partial refitting she was commissioned anew and entrusted to my charge. Wednesday, the 9th inst. was appointed for the issuing of instructions. Two or three veteran pilot
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