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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 12.. Search the whole document.

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Charles (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
in pipes of pitch-pine logs, by the Boston Aqueduct Corporation, chartered in 1795. In 1825, three years after Boston became a city, on recommendation of the city council, a commission was appointed to ascertain the practicability of supplying the city with good water for the domestic use of the inhabitants, as well as for the extinguishing of fires and all the general purposes of comfort and cleanliness. The report was made that a good supply of pure water could be obtained from the Charles river, above Watertown, and from Spot pond in Stoneham. The subject was discussed, but this important project was laid aside until taken up again by the city council in 1834. In October of that year an engineer stated that there were 2,767 wells in the city; 2,085 were drinkable, 682 were bad, and only 7 of the whole number were occasionally used for washing. Eighteen years had passed since Spot pond had been recommended for Boston's use, and that there were men shrewd enough to see what
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 6
e pump in the market place; and other water supplies of Medford, old and modern. by Eliza M. Gill. [Read before the Medford Historical Society, January 2, 1909.] THE meeting-house and the village pump have been conspicuous objects in the New England towns of the past, and each of these widely different institutions has been necessary to the community, and around them the waves of life have rolled and surged. At the meeting-house the spiritual needs of our ancestors were filled; there tf each succeeding week. There too was mental stimulus obtained, not only from the long and weighty sermons often timed by a more than once turned hour-glass, but also from the debates in the town meetings, when church and state being one, the New England freemen met in the sacred edifice to plan civil benefits and set in motion the machinery of public affairs. The pump ministered to the physical needs of the people in a two-fold way, for the great treasure it dispensed refreshed and cleanse
Clinton (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
it not have seemed an incredible tale even though they knew of the aqueducts and luxurious baths of old Rome? Would they not have marveled at the immense reservoirs, at the great mains that thread our streets, the smaller pipes that run through streets and lofty houses; at the ponderous hydraulic machinery that is the great moving power of the Metropolitan Water System? This elaborate service of the State supplies nineteen cities and towns with water, the main source being located in Clinton, Mass., in the middle of the Commonwealth, nearly fifty miles away. Several cities and towns within the prescribed circle, the radius of which is ten miles from the State House, are furnishing their own water, but at any time, any within this circle are privileged to become a part of the Metropolitan service. Swampscott, outside of this district, is supplied by a special arrangement. The Metropolitan Water District comprises three water sheds, the Nashua, Sudbury and Cochituate, drawing fr
Watertown (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
ly seen in the country, and Medford had a number in her territory. When we remember that the amount of travel through here for many years was very great, and that large droves of cattle passed through to and from the cattle yards at Brighton, Watertown and Willow Bridge, we can realize the benefit these water-ways were to the drovers, especially when there were crowds around the two troughs in the center of the town. One of these ways I knew well, and it was a pleasure to pass through it wer for the domestic use of the inhabitants, as well as for the extinguishing of fires and all the general purposes of comfort and cleanliness. The report was made that a good supply of pure water could be obtained from the Charles river, above Watertown, and from Spot pond in Stoneham. The subject was discussed, but this important project was laid aside until taken up again by the city council in 1834. In October of that year an engineer stated that there were 2,767 wells in the city; 2,085
Winter Hill (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
s the last to disappear and gave way to the march of time, perhaps fifteen years ago, when the boulevard through Valley street was laid out and changes made as it came into Forest street. It was on the westerly side of Forest street, north of Kidder's hill, its water coming from Pine hill, the little stream called Gravelly creek. Some of these driveways were quite shallow, being used more for carriages to pass through than for watering cattle. They were located on Main street, foot of Winter hill; High street, foot of Marm Simonds' hill; another on High street near Canal street; one also at Weir bridge; a second over Gravelly creek on Salem street, near our present common; and one on Winthrop street near the estate of the late Peter C. Hall, commonly called Chardon Hall, whose dwelling-house is now the farm-house on Gen. S. C. Lawrence's estate. The streams thus utilized were Winter, Meeting-House, Whitmore brooks, in addition to Gravelly creek, before mentioned. When the in
Pasture Hill (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
he Middlesex canal. Gilbert Parker, who carried on a jobbing business, was a familiar sight in the '40s as he went back and forth with his white horse and hay rigging to and from the canal with water for the different families. Sometimes a few were favored by getting water from the distillery on Ship street, which could be obtained there warm. It is said the excellence of Medford rum was due, among other things, to the purity of the water used in the making which came from a spring on Pasture Hill, off that part which today we call Governors avenue, beyond the estate of Harry Dutton. The first of these wells south of the river was on the west side of Main street, about forty feet from the highway, in the track of the boulevard now being built. This was owned by James Gregg. The water was not fit to drink. A second was south of where Hartshorn's harness shop stands today, on the right of the passageway and about forty feet from the street. In a house on the site of the one st
Melrose (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
terns, it was natural that the attention of our citizens should turn to that fine body of water partly within the limits of the town. The Spot Pond Water Company had been incorporated in 1867 by a committee from the towns of Medford, Malden and Melrose, with a view to the future needs of these places, and two years later the franchise was purchased by them. In 1870, by way of Salem street, and the year following by way of Forest street, Medford was piped and supplied by water from this pond, d until the needs of Greater Boston for a supply of water became a great and burning question. The Metropolitan Water Board was established in 1895. Medford became a part of the Metropolitan Water District, and in conjunction with Malden and Melrose she surrendered Spot pond to the State. The litigation and expense attending this transfer you all know. In 1901 the consolidation of the Metropolitan Water Board and the Board of Metropolitan Sewerage Commissioners took place, and we are no
Brighton, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
reports were signed by Benjamin H. Sampson, chief engineer. It has been the custom in road building when a stream crossed the road to have the grade such that cattle could be watered there and teams driven through. These natural watering places are frequently seen in the country, and Medford had a number in her territory. When we remember that the amount of travel through here for many years was very great, and that large droves of cattle passed through to and from the cattle yards at Brighton, Watertown and Willow Bridge, we can realize the benefit these water-ways were to the drovers, especially when there were crowds around the two troughs in the center of the town. One of these ways I knew well, and it was a pleasure to pass through it when driving. It was the last to disappear and gave way to the march of time, perhaps fifteen years ago, when the boulevard through Valley street was laid out and changes made as it came into Forest street. It was on the westerly side of Fo
Stoneham (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
nhabitants, as well as for the extinguishing of fires and all the general purposes of comfort and cleanliness. The report was made that a good supply of pure water could be obtained from the Charles river, above Watertown, and from Spot pond in Stoneham. The subject was discussed, but this important project was laid aside until taken up again by the city council in 1834. In October of that year an engineer stated that there were 2,767 wells in the city; 2,085 were drinkable, 682 were bad, andwarrant for the Medford Town Meeting, February 13, 1843: 4th. To hear and act on the order of notice By the General Court on the petition of James C. Odiorne & others to be incorporated for the purpose of laying an aqueduct from Spot Pond in Stoneham to the City of Boston. The action of the town is thus recorded:— Voted, That the matter contained in the article be referred to the Selectmen, and the Representative to the General Court, with instructions to see that the interests of the
Spot Pond (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 6
onjunction with Malden and Melrose she surrendered Spot pond to the State. The litigation and expense attendin Greater Boston, and on account of the relation of Spot pond to the subject, it is not inappropriate to speak b from the Charles river, above Watertown, and from Spot pond in Stoneham. The subject was discussed, but this ed for washing. Eighteen years had passed since Spot pond had been recommended for Boston's use, and that thporated for the purpose of laying an aqueduct from Spot Pond in Stoneham to the City of Boston. The action o case a Co is incorporated to lay an aqueduct from Spot Pond to Boston. As the act of incorporation did not on, October 25, 1848. After the introduction of Spot pond water into Medford the pump in the square reached f the past is preserved for future generations. Spot Pond. O, beautiful lake of Middlesex Fells, air as thyheld thee in fetters fast; Winthrop gazed and called thee a fair Spot Pond. Fair may we keep thee to the last.
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