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large tract of land westward changed ownership and building operations began thereon and also in the other portion. In April of the same year Mr. Chapman removed and was succeeded by Rev. Louis Charpiot (a Congregational preacher of ability, but 's better for us to let them have it. And so the effort we had made, and organization effected, seemed to many a sort of April-fool joke. Our preacher, Rev. G. C. Osgood (afterward well known in Medford), was given another charge and we continuen, a younger brother of our present Bishop Hamilton, was engaged as a supply till the session of the Annual Conference in April. Upon his coming he made a good impression and was favorably received. He entered heartily into the work, residing in osell a portion of our land, thereby reducing our indebtedness about one thousand three hundred dollars. At Conference, in April, Rev. William Full was appointed to this charge. He was a member of Conference and a native of Nova Scotia, and immediat
he Doxology and Benediction, and the public worship of Almighty God according to Methodist Episcopal usage was thus begun in West Medford eighteen months after the organization of the Second Church, which, by the incorporation of its trustees in January following, assumed the present name of Trinity. It is doubtful if such a case as this has a parallel. For a church to organize with ten members, find no public meeting place, lose one of its most energetic ones by death, reorganize with seveat Conference was continued as our supply when Brother Wagner's charge over us ceased. During the summer Mr. Hamilton became interested in the study of law, and the fact that no man can serve two masters very soon became apparent. Early in January (1875) following, Presiding Elder Dorchester removed him and placed the Rev. E. C. Herdmann, also a student, in charge of the society. He was a young married man, of rare gifts and engaging personality, and his wife, in the visits she made us,
of history. The Medford minister, Rev. Ebenezer Turell (though the son-in-law of Dr. Colman), did not regard Whitefield favorably, and refused him admittance to the Medford pulpit, and, in reply to the zealots asking it, preached a sermon magnifying his (own) office, and at Whitefield's death, in 1770, another, somewhat discrediting, if we may judge by the text—Man at his best estate is altogether vanity. Whitefield was followed by Richard Boardman in 1772. Freeborn Garrettson came in 1787, and Jesse Lee preached under the old elm on Boston Common in 1790. All these are mentioned as connecting links in the chain of circumstances of church organization. The war of Revolution not only chilled missionary zeal, but wellnigh obliterated the Anglican Church. The acknowledgment of American independence led to its organization in two branches—the Methodist Episcopal in 1784 and the Protestant Episcopal in 1789. Each adopted, with various modifications, the Articles of Religion
the son-in-law of Dr. Colman), did not regard Whitefield favorably, and refused him admittance to the Medford pulpit, and, in reply to the zealots asking it, preached a sermon magnifying his (own) office, and at Whitefield's death, in 1770, another, somewhat discrediting, if we may judge by the text—Man at his best estate is altogether vanity. Whitefield was followed by Richard Boardman in 1772. Freeborn Garrettson came in 1787, and Jesse Lee preached under the old elm on Boston Common in 1790. All these are mentioned as connecting links in the chain of circumstances of church organization. The war of Revolution not only chilled missionary zeal, but wellnigh obliterated the Anglican Church. The acknowledgment of American independence led to its organization in two branches—the Methodist Episcopal in 1784 and the Protestant Episcopal in 1789. Each adopted, with various modifications, the Articles of Religion and the Ritual contained in the Book of Common Prayer. Each was fo
as followed by Richard Boardman in 1772. Freeborn Garrettson came in 1787, and Jesse Lee preached under the old elm on Boston Common in 1790. All these are mentioned as connecting links in the chain of circumstances of church organization. The war of Revolution not only chilled missionary zeal, but wellnigh obliterated the Anglican Church. The acknowledgment of American independence led to its organization in two branches—the Methodist Episcopal in 1784 and the Protestant Episcopal in 1789. Each adopted, with various modifications, the Articles of Religion and the Ritual contained in the Book of Common Prayer. Each was formed on the Anglican model, with bishops, presbyters or elders, and deacons in its ministry. A few years after Whitefield's death the church at Medford secured as assistant to their minister the Rev. David Osgood, who on the former's decease succeeded him, and himself passed away on December 12, 1822. At his calling, four influential members (holding Armi
January 1st (search for this): chapter 13
. She was one of those who came from Arlington, and there was one who walked both ways from the Heights twice on Sunday and to class meeting. At the Conference of 1880 Rev. George M. Smiley received his first appointment, and to our church. He had supplied a church in New Jersey while studying at Drew Seminary. Far different was the outlook from that in 1877. The church, though small in numbers, was united, enthusiastic and ready, to the best of its knowledge and ability, to begin a new year's work with a resident pastor. During the year the Sunday-school increased and was brought to a high state of discipline and efficiency under the charge of Brother S. C. Johnson. The benevolent collections also were increased, and a marked interest showed itself in the spiritual as well as social work. During the next year began the development of a special line of thought, later carried to an extreme, causing unhappy differences, but as yet not inharmonious. A third appointment con
June 20th, 1873 AD (search for this): chapter 13
ected at once, and that Mystic Hall would soon be at our disposal. Many and anxious were our plans in relation thereto. During the winter one of our energetic laymen, Brother N. D. Ripley, died, and we felt his loss keenly. Another removed from town. Spring opened and the new house of worship seemed farther in the future. So with a courage born of desperation we said, Let us arise and build. So after much preliminary work the second M. E. Church assembled in Quarterly Conference on June 20, 1873. Presiding Elder Sherman appointed Rev. Francis J. Wagner of the First Church (who was present) preacher in charge. A new board of stewards was chosen, also trustees and a building committee. Stewards. William McLean. M. W. Mann. Martin M. French. Charles E. Hippisley. Trustees. M. W. Mann. William McLean. M. M. French. E. J. Albee. W. T. Morse. Building committee. M. M. French. W. B. Foster. William McLean. M. W. Mann. George W. Brintnall. The
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