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Dallas (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
ber have here entered into the experience of Christian life because of the church. Therein is its greatest success, and in such work is its truest mission. Those that come to us from other places are heartily welcome, but our gain is others' loss. But a soul saved from sin, or redeemed from carelessness and indifference is truer gain, greater success, and it is on this line that our church effort is made. Our denomination is represented in Medford today by four societies—First, Trinity, Bethany and Hillside—all located near the border of Medford's territory, and all have found it no easy task to obtain their present status, but are here to stay as long as there is the Master's work to do. The theocratic rule of the Puritan that hung the Quakers, whipped the Baptists and persecuted the Anglican Church when they came has passed away, and the charge of the Lord's cavalry, the early Methodist preachers then known as circuit riders in New England, had much to do with it. The Unitari
The Common (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
not good for man to be alone, took unto himself a wife, so a parsonage became needful. As no house was available a good friend built one and rented it to the church, and to it, after the Ladies' Aid had a hand in the furnishing, the pastor brought his bride. It was hoped that his would be a three-year term, for he was doing a grand work. Unhappily the doctrinal thought already alluded to had taken more pronounced form, and at Conference of 1888 he was appointed to the Old South Church at Reading, where he successfully served the then full term of five years. During his first year there all hearts were saddened by the untimely passing away of his estimable wife, whom all had learned to love. Beautiful in life and character was she, and lovely as the lilies in our window that is her memorial. Baker Memorial (Boston) and Westfield next claimed him, and while at the latter he was called home. Twenty-one names are on our register received by him. Rev. William J. Hambleton was n
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 13
In other places, the action here was followed by the formation of societies of like views, bearing various names, affiliated with the Evangelical Association of New England. In what I have said of this movement there is no word of bitterness or aspersion of the motives or character of those who went out from us. It was an unhappy telephone. Their efforts are not alone for their local church, as one of their former presidents (Mrs. Mann) has for the past ten years been connected with the New England Deaconess Aid Society, and for the past four years its vice-president. The first to enter this service, she has succeeded in enthusing numbers of others, and orsecuted the Anglican Church when they came has passed away, and the charge of the Lord's cavalry, the early Methodist preachers then known as circuit riders in New England, had much to do with it. The Unitarian preaching of Channing and Universalist of Murray was in the battle also, until the old conformity to the standing order
Halifax (Canada) (search for this): chapter 13
n various ways, removing some prejudices that needlessly existed. Up to the close of Brother Brant's ministry with us seven more had joined us, making our membership twenty-one in full connection and several on probation. During this year we thought it advisable to sell a portion of our land, thereby reducing our indebtedness about one thousand three hundred dollars. At Conference, in April, Rev. William Full was appointed to this charge. He was a member of Conference and a native of Nova Scotia, and immediately came to live among us. Brother Full put in some energetic work, as did also his wife, as far as her health would permit. The hard times were being seriously felt and our people were discouraged. One of our trustees tells of one occasion when only he, his wife, and the pastor were attendants at the mid-week prayer meeting. During the early autumn the West Somerville pulpit became vacant and the two churches were united under Brother Full's care, and the next year he
Baltimore, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
he next three years our charge was read to be supplied, and we were fortunate in our supplies. Rev. Sylvester S. Klyne of the North Dakota Conference, pursuing special study in Boston University, served us for two years. He was an able preacher and profound scholar, and in his limited time did no little pastoral work, and in this latter was ably seconded by his devoted wife. From here he went to an important church in West Virginia, and is now pastor of the largest church of our order in Baltimore. In April, 1907, Rev. Herbert A. Keck from the Iowa Conference (and also the university) came to us under the same limit of partial work. He ably succeeded Brother Klyne in the pulpit, and in the weekly prayer meeting has never been excelled in the history of the church. His home in the West claimed him at the end of one year, where his people have just dedicated a fine new church edifice. At the Conference of 1907 Rev. Herbert Smith Dow was appointed, and came an utter stranger to
Puritan (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
Society, April 18, 1910, and illustrated by forty lantern slides.] MEDFORD, one of the oldest towns of Massachusetts, had no church organization for over seventy years, and no meeting-house till sixty years after its settlement. The Gospel was preached here, however. Though at first styled a peculiar, it was like others in the fact that nearly two centuries elapsed ere there was a second and other than Puritan church. It did what all the others did, it had a spirit of conformity to Puritan ideas, looked with little favor on any non-conforming ones, Quaker, Anabaptist, Romanist or Anglican, and acted accordingly. For nearly two hundred years there was a union of church and state in colony and province; the church called the minister, the parish concurred, and the town by taxation paid him and built its meeting-house, which latter was all its name implied. A century and a quarter of theocratic rule and intolerance had wrought decay and spiritual languor, when Edwards arou
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
Trinity Methodist Episcopal Church. by Moses Whitcher Mann. [Read before the Medford Historical Society, April 18, 1910, and illustrated by forty lantern slides.] MEDFORD, one of the oldest towns of Massachusetts, had no church organization for over seventy years, and no meeting-house till sixty years after its settlement. The Gospel was preached here, however. Though at first styled a peculiar, it was like others in the fact that nearly two centuries elapsed ere there was a second anothers, and organized numerous circles of girls as deaconess' helpers. One of its number, Mrs. E. G. Came, was the prime mover, in 1893, of the effort that resulted in the Ladies' Aid Union, now representing over one hundred societies of Eastern Massachusetts, and was its first president, and in 1902 another, Mrs. Elizabeth J. C. Mann, who had served as secretary, filled the same honorable position. The building of the two houses of worship, their repair, and maintenance of public worship, ha
Westfield Reservoir (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
Unhappily the doctrinal thought already alluded to had taken more pronounced form, and at Conference of 1888 he was appointed to the Old South Church at Reading, where he successfully served the then full term of five years. During his first year there all hearts were saddened by the untimely passing away of his estimable wife, whom all had learned to love. Beautiful in life and character was she, and lovely as the lilies in our window that is her memorial. Baker Memorial (Boston) and Westfield next claimed him, and while at the latter he was called home. Twenty-one names are on our register received by him. Rev. William J. Hambleton was next assigned to Trinity, and came with the experience of years to his credit, while of Mrs. Hambleton it was well said, She is just like mother. The younger element that had been drawn to Brother Upham's ministry had hardly become assimilated to the church, and had much to learn of loyalty to the church and its polity. Some, however, rema
Kuakatch (Arizona, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
, during that time gather seven more members while holding no public service (for lack of place) until its dedication, was certainly in itself a novel situation. But this is just what was done. The entire cost of the property was between eight and nine thousand dollars. Four thousand five hundred dollars was raised by mortgage, and for a time two hundred and fifty dollars was floated. While the chapel was in construction came the great tidal wave of financial depression that followed the Wall street panic known as Black Friday. The Boston City Missionary Society, that had given encouragement to the enterprise and promise of financial help, in the stringency was unable to redeem its promise and we were left to our own resources. Nevertheless, the work went on and the chapel was completed on time, and the prophecy of the tenement house still remains unfulfilled, though in its reconstructed form it has housed the Baptists, the Roman Catholics and Congregationalists. On Sunday m
Glenwood, Mills County, Iowa (Iowa, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
l part of his work, it may be well to consider the geographical and other conditions. From a population of one thousand five hundred in 1822, in the half century Medford had grown to about four times that number. Instead of the one meetinghouse, seven denominations were represented by eight substantial houses of worship, five located eastward from Medford square. The western village had then (1872) about six hundred inhabitants, and was in prospect of immediate increase. Wellington, Glenwood, South Medford, the Dudley street section and Hillside were thinly settled portions. No public conveyance existed between them. The Unitarian and Protestant Episcopal Churches were the nearest to the western section, the two Congregational were considering union of forces under one roof, and the Methodist and Baptist were to build new churches still farther removed. At intervals a Methodist class meeting had been held at Mrs. Hawley's on Prescott street, beginning in 1864, under the le
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