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Browsing named entities in a specific section of Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 14.. Search the whole document.

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Pawtucket (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
A Rill from an ancient spring. A writer in the Pawtucket (R. I.) Chronicle (April, 1885) tells of Ancient Times and A Boston Well, and says, Forty years ago, the inhabitants of Boston became disgusted with the water of the city, which had become polluted with house drainage. After alluding to the introduction of Cochituate water he said, It seems that here and there an ancient well has continued to be used. Dug in a lot less crowded with buildings and fed perhaps by a living spring, it has still been allowed to furnish rills to slake human thirst. One of these wells was in an estate owned by Peter C. Brooks. ... Mr. Brooks was known by report at least to some of our citizens . . . His former [city] residence was at 89 Mt. Vernon street and was sold last week. The lot contained about a quarter of an acre, and has on it a well which has always been known as Blackstone's well. Its water is uncontaminated and has continued to be used till the present day. The brown stone house j
Blackstone (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
ent well has continued to be used. Dug in a lot less crowded with buildings and fed perhaps by a living spring, it has still been allowed to furnish rills to slake human thirst. One of these wells was in an estate owned by Peter C. Brooks. ... Mr. Brooks was known by report at least to some of our citizens . . . His former [city] residence was at 89 Mt. Vernon street and was sold last week. The lot contained about a quarter of an acre, and has on it a well which has always been known as Blackstone's well. Its water is uncontaminated and has continued to be used till the present day. The brown stone house just sold, stands on the site of the house which Blackstone occupied over two centuries and a half ago .... There were sweet and pleasant springs which promised a more healthful beverage to the early settlers who came from Salem to Charlestown and were not satisfied with the supply of water there to be had and so went over to Trimountain where Blaxton had already located. Only
Salem (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 17
e was at 89 Mt. Vernon street and was sold last week. The lot contained about a quarter of an acre, and has on it a well which has always been known as Blackstone's well. Its water is uncontaminated and has continued to be used till the present day. The brown stone house just sold, stands on the site of the house which Blackstone occupied over two centuries and a half ago .... There were sweet and pleasant springs which promised a more healthful beverage to the early settlers who came from Salem to Charlestown and were not satisfied with the supply of water there to be had and so went over to Trimountain where Blaxton had already located. Only a few years ago, while excavating for the foundations of the Old South Building, in Spring lane, the ancient Governor's spring (Winthrop's) bubbled up anew. It is now twenty-six years since the above was written and given to the world in the Chronicle; and recently the country seat of Mr. Brooks, in West Medford, has gone into other han
Peter C. Brooks (search for this): chapter 17
buildings and fed perhaps by a living spring, it has still been allowed to furnish rills to slake human thirst. One of these wells was in an estate owned by Peter C. Brooks. ... Mr. Brooks was known by report at least to some of our citizens . . . His former [city] residence was at 89 Mt. Vernon street and was sold last week. ThMr. Brooks was known by report at least to some of our citizens . . . His former [city] residence was at 89 Mt. Vernon street and was sold last week. The lot contained about a quarter of an acre, and has on it a well which has always been known as Blackstone's well. Its water is uncontaminated and has continued to be used till the present day. The brown stone house just sold, stands on the site of the house which Blackstone occupied over two centuries and a half ago .... There wWinthrop's) bubbled up anew. It is now twenty-six years since the above was written and given to the world in the Chronicle; and recently the country seat of Mr. Brooks, in West Medford, has gone into other hands. That he was the owner of the ancient Blaxton spring is of interest to Medford, and the Register thus notes the sam
Blackstone (search for this): chapter 17
thirst. One of these wells was in an estate owned by Peter C. Brooks. ... Mr. Brooks was known by report at least to some of our citizens . . . His former [city] residence was at 89 Mt. Vernon street and was sold last week. The lot contained about a quarter of an acre, and has on it a well which has always been known as Blackstone's well. Its water is uncontaminated and has continued to be used till the present day. The brown stone house just sold, stands on the site of the house which Blackstone occupied over two centuries and a half ago .... There were sweet and pleasant springs which promised a more healthful beverage to the early settlers who came from Salem to Charlestown and were not satisfied with the supply of water there to be had and so went over to Trimountain where Blaxton had already located. Only a few years ago, while excavating for the foundations of the Old South Building, in Spring lane, the ancient Governor's spring (Winthrop's) bubbled up anew. It is now
John Winthrop (search for this): chapter 17
ys been known as Blackstone's well. Its water is uncontaminated and has continued to be used till the present day. The brown stone house just sold, stands on the site of the house which Blackstone occupied over two centuries and a half ago .... There were sweet and pleasant springs which promised a more healthful beverage to the early settlers who came from Salem to Charlestown and were not satisfied with the supply of water there to be had and so went over to Trimountain where Blaxton had already located. Only a few years ago, while excavating for the foundations of the Old South Building, in Spring lane, the ancient Governor's spring (Winthrop's) bubbled up anew. It is now twenty-six years since the above was written and given to the world in the Chronicle; and recently the country seat of Mr. Brooks, in West Medford, has gone into other hands. That he was the owner of the ancient Blaxton spring is of interest to Medford, and the Register thus notes the same as above stated.
April, 1885 AD (search for this): chapter 17
A Rill from an ancient spring. A writer in the Pawtucket (R. I.) Chronicle (April, 1885) tells of Ancient Times and A Boston Well, and says, Forty years ago, the inhabitants of Boston became disgusted with the water of the city, which had become polluted with house drainage. After alluding to the introduction of Cochituate water he said, It seems that here and there an ancient well has continued to be used. Dug in a lot less crowded with buildings and fed perhaps by a living spring, it has still been allowed to furnish rills to slake human thirst. One of these wells was in an estate owned by Peter C. Brooks. ... Mr. Brooks was known by report at least to some of our citizens . . . His former [city] residence was at 89 Mt. Vernon street and was sold last week. The lot contained about a quarter of an acre, and has on it a well which has always been known as Blackstone's well. Its water is uncontaminated and has continued to be used till the present day. The brown stone house j