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New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 16
ouse to his son Charles, then a bachelor, and the west-tern to his daughter, also an Abigail. She is said to have lived and died a quasi widow, for her Scotch husband, Hugh Tarbett, was a Loyalist, and decamped with the Tories in 1776. Charles Fitch rented his half to General John Brooks (afterwards and for seven years governor), who had taken up the practice of medicine in Medford after the Revolution. It was here that he was living when President Washington visited him while on his New England tour, in October, 1789, coming from Boston early in the morning, and going from Medford to Salem. The Medford schoolhouse was then close by and the school kept by Mr. Prentiss. He ranged his young charges before the house, each holding a quill that the illustrious visitor might know that they were school children. Seventy years afterward the testimony of aged residents—these former school children—was gathered up by one interested, and incidents carefully noted. Of these written, b
Charles Fitch (search for this): chapter 16
f one continuous slope backward, the rafters being fitted against the older ones. The attics of the older part were roughly plastered between the joists and the mode of construction easily seen. In his turn he gave the eastern half next the meetinghouse to his son Charles, then a bachelor, and the west-tern to his daughter, also an Abigail. She is said to have lived and died a quasi widow, for her Scotch husband, Hugh Tarbett, was a Loyalist, and decamped with the Tories in 1776. Charles Fitch rented his half to General John Brooks (afterwards and for seven years governor), who had taken up the practice of medicine in Medford after the Revolution. It was here that he was living when President Washington visited him while on his New England tour, in October, 1789, coming from Boston early in the morning, and going from Medford to Salem. The Medford schoolhouse was then close by and the school kept by Mr. Prentiss. He ranged his young charges before the house, each holding
Jonathan Watson (search for this): chapter 16
dford's old houses has been demolished, preparatory to extensive improvements in the immediate vicinity. Built by Jonathan Watson in 1738, it has, till within the past eleven years, been constantly occupied, and is worthy of more than a cursory nial doorway, and the weather boarding extending to the corner angles without the usual and more modern corner board. Mr. Watson gave the west half of the house to his daughter, Abigail, the widow of Samuel Angier, probably by will, though we haveept a dame's school in her only first-floor room at some time after her husband's death. The eastern portion went to Mr. Watson's son Jonathan, who, with his sister, sold the property and moved to Upper Medford, now known as Symmes' Corner in Winc give place to dwellings of modern type and containing such accessories and conveniences as were little dreamed of when Mr. Watson built it or Doctor Brooks entertained America's first President within its walls. The room that was the doctor's off
Hugh Tarbett (search for this): chapter 16
t remove the old gambrel roof, but covered the new portion with a roof of one continuous slope backward, the rafters being fitted against the older ones. The attics of the older part were roughly plastered between the joists and the mode of construction easily seen. In his turn he gave the eastern half next the meetinghouse to his son Charles, then a bachelor, and the west-tern to his daughter, also an Abigail. She is said to have lived and died a quasi widow, for her Scotch husband, Hugh Tarbett, was a Loyalist, and decamped with the Tories in 1776. Charles Fitch rented his half to General John Brooks (afterwards and for seven years governor), who had taken up the practice of medicine in Medford after the Revolution. It was here that he was living when President Washington visited him while on his New England tour, in October, 1789, coming from Boston early in the morning, and going from Medford to Salem. The Medford schoolhouse was then close by and the school kept by Mr.
Peter C. Brooks (search for this): chapter 16
e last built by the town; the Unitarian, built in 1839 (on which was the old Paul Revere bell and the clock given by Peter C. Brooks, both in service on the former house and destroyed by the fire); and the present stone edifice of the First Parish. Since Cleopas Johnson's death the house has been unoccupied and falling into decay. It is now to give place to dwellings of modern type and containing such accessories and conveniences as were little dreamed of when Mr. Watson built it or Doctor Brooks entertained America's first President within its walls. The room that was the doctor's office was very unpretentious as compared with those of modern practitioners, but the fireplace where the corn cakes were cooked for Washington's breakfast was a substantial one of generous size, and supported by a massive arch in the cellar. These were in the newer part added by Timothy Fitch. The fireplaces in the original house were much larger, and the one in the west room had the chimney corn
Timothy Fitch (search for this): chapter 16
tern portion went to Mr. Watson's son Jonathan, who, with his sister, sold the property and moved to Upper Medford, now known as Symmes' Corner in Winchester. Timothy Fitch was the purchaser, and was then a resident of Boston and Nantucket. He never lived in this house, and it would seem that he purchased for investment. Later he became a resident of Medford, buying the home of Parson Turell not long after the latter's death, which occured in 1778. Mr. Fitch enlarged the house by building at its rear, extending the new portion by the ends of the original house, and building a large chimney therein. This part was divided into numerous rooms, and sheds cooked for Washington's breakfast was a substantial one of generous size, and supported by a massive arch in the cellar. These were in the newer part added by Timothy Fitch. The fireplaces in the original house were much larger, and the one in the west room had the chimney corner where the old people sat snugly ensconced beside t
mer school children—was gathered up by one interested, and incidents carefully noted. Of these written, but unpublished, notes we mention a few. One who was then a young miss tells how gaily she was attired, and speaks of the polite bow the President accorded her as he passed her home. Another, a boy, and of course interested in horses, tells of the cavalcade of gentlemen that escorted Washington from Boston, and how the horses were cared for at his father's stable, where is now the vacant Magoun mansion. Another girl remembers her elders of the women telling how General Brooks requested Mrs. Brooks to have Indian corn cakes for breakfast, knowing his superior's especial liking therefor. In after years, when a Medford boy visited Governor Brooks, who took great pride in his garden and was taking the boy about it, the Governor told him with much pleasure of his illustrious visitor, remarking that it was their last interview. The house had a succession of tenants till in 1810 Sa
ett, was a Loyalist, and decamped with the Tories in 1776. Charles Fitch rented his half to General John Brooks (afterwards and for seven years governor), who had taken up the practice of medicine in Medford after the Revolution. It was here that he was living when President Washington visited him while on his New England tour, in October, 1789, coming from Boston early in the morning, and going from Medford to Salem. The Medford schoolhouse was then close by and the school kept by Mr. Prentiss. He ranged his young charges before the house, each holding a quill that the illustrious visitor might know that they were school children. Seventy years afterward the testimony of aged residents—these former school children—was gathered up by one interested, and incidents carefully noted. Of these written, but unpublished, notes we mention a few. One who was then a young miss tells how gaily she was attired, and speaks of the polite bow the President accorded her as he passed her hom
George Washington (search for this): chapter 16
ped with the Tories in 1776. Charles Fitch rented his half to General John Brooks (afterwards and for seven years governor), who had taken up the practice of medicine in Medford after the Revolution. It was here that he was living when President Washington visited him while on his New England tour, in October, 1789, coming from Boston early in the morning, and going from Medford to Salem. The Medford schoolhouse was then close by and the school kept by Mr. Prentiss. He ranged his young cOne who was then a young miss tells how gaily she was attired, and speaks of the polite bow the President accorded her as he passed her home. Another, a boy, and of course interested in horses, tells of the cavalcade of gentlemen that escorted Washington from Boston, and how the horses were cared for at his father's stable, where is now the vacant Magoun mansion. Another girl remembers her elders of the women telling how General Brooks requested Mrs. Brooks to have Indian corn cakes for breakf
Samuel Swan (search for this): chapter 16
Brooks, who took great pride in his garden and was taking the boy about it, the Governor told him with much pleasure of his illustrious visitor, remarking that it was their last interview. The house had a succession of tenants till in 1810 Samuel Swan became its owner and occupant, dying at sea in 1823. His widow Margaret, commonly called Peggy, Swan, continued to reside there and rented a portion of the house until her passing away. Of the occupants during the past fifty years we can sSwan, continued to reside there and rented a portion of the house until her passing away. Of the occupants during the past fifty years we can speak with certainty of but one, the last, Cleopas Johnson, who died there on December 17, 1902. He was a carpenter and builder and a thorough mechanic, as was also his partner and brother, Theophilus. The brothers were familiarly called Cope and Tope by all the old-timers of Medford. Cleopas outlived his brother. When the Unitarian Church was burned he rang the bell in alarm until the rope burned off and fell, useless. The old Watson house has been a near neighbor to three houses of worsh
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