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was appointed for the purpose. Here a class was organized by Father Doherty, the teachers being the men and women of the congregation. All the territory north of Charlestown and Cambridge was then without the services of a priest, and on the Sundays between the monthly visits of Father Doherty the faithful trudged on foot to Charlestown and back, rather than to be without Mass, in that splendid zeal for the faith which is so admirable. A conveyance owned by Constable Butler of Malden made the trip on these Sundays between Malden and Charlestown, but the round fare was forty cents, a prohibitive amount for the greater number of the immigrant settlers, whose pay was small and whose hardships were many. In one of these journeys they heard that a priest had newly arrived from the English mission. His name was Rev. John Ryan, formerly curate of the Catholic parish of Ashton-under-Lyne, near the city of Manchester. He was for the present the guest of Father Hamilton, pastor of St
Our year's work. THE season of 1913-14 has been unusual, in that the February meeting was omitted on account of a very severe snow-storm. Other meetings have taken place at the regular time. At the annual one in January, for the election of officers, no paper was given. At this time, and also at the opening and closing meetings, light refreshments were served, and social intercourse added to the pleasures of the evening as the various papers were discussed informally by little groups, and friend met friend with happy reminiscences. Our own members or townsmen have served the Society by giving papers, and only twice have people outside of Medford been called upon for this purpose, and one of these is a member of this Society. This is proof enough that there are a faithful few in Medford, loyal to their home town, and ready always to give of their time, strength and talents for the preservation of our local history, and for the entertainment of their auditors or reade
Our year's work. THE season of 1913-14 has been unusual, in that the February meeting was omitted on account of a very severe snow-storm. Other meetings have taken place at the regular time. At the annual one in January, for the election of officers, no paper was given. At this time, and also at the opening and closing meetings, light refreshments were served, and social intercourse added to the pleasures of the evening as the various papers were discussed informally by little groups, and friend met friend with happy reminiscences. Our own members or townsmen have served the Society by giving papers, and only twice have people outside of Medford been called upon for this purpose, and one of these is a member of this Society. This is proof enough that there are a faithful few in Medford, loyal to their home town, and ready always to give of their time, strength and talents for the preservation of our local history, and for the entertainment of their auditors or reader
February 3rd (search for this): chapter 25
Medford's Namesakes. It has been the purpose of the Register to furnish its readers authentic information as to the other Medfords of our country, fourteen in all. To compass this we addressed, on February 3 last, to the town or city clerk of each, a letter of inquiry. All had our address on the cover, contained stamps for reply, and were written in uniform text. They especially enquired as to the naming of the place, and stated that such historical article as might be prepared would (when published) be sent to the replying informants. These letters also stated that, through the Register's exchange list and the various libraries into which it goes, the various Medfords might be better known. Of these fourteen places, but five have been heard from, and but one letter returned undelivered. We are thus sure that the other eight must have reached some municipal officer who took no interest in the matter, and failed to make reply that would have cost only the effort of writing.
February 4th (search for this): chapter 13
Medford weather. WE live in a region having a variable climate, and the same season in different years shows either great change or extremes of temperature. January, 1913, had a very light snow-fall, and has been put on record as being remarkably warm. The night of January 12, 1914, with high wind brought a drop in temperature and frozen water pipes that will not soon be forgotten by Medford householders. Two weeks later and spring conditions prevailed, reaching a climax on February 4, changing to winter and first real snow storm of the season at nightfall of the 6th. Today, February 12, 1914, Boston is experiencing the coldest day for eighteen years. New England is the coldest section of the country, and the thermometers in our city have registered from eleven degrees to sixteen degrees below, and a Boston paper gives credit for twenty-three degrees below, probably in the out-lying districts. For days the ground has been covered with a few inches of well-packed snow, furnis
voted to have a new bell, and that the old one be given in part pay. The contract for its casting was given to Paul Revere and Sons, whose bill of $552.75 was allowed on November 1 of that year. Benjamin Reed was paid $2.50 for bringing up the bell, and Fitch Hall, Joseph Hall and B. Farrington were paid sums aggregating $27.74 for placing it in position. Isaac Floyd was paid $15.83 for six months ringing. On April 1, 1805, the town voted not to pay for ringing the bell every day. In March meeting, 1803, the selectmen were directed to sell the old bell when they could obtain a reasonable price, and this is the last information we have of the first Medford bell. Evidently Medford did not pay cash in those days, as on January 2, 1804, the selectmen gave an order to Revere and Sons for $31.74 interest on their bill for the bell. In 1810 this second Medford bell had an associate in public service in the steeple of the third meeting-house. Hon. Peter C. Brooks presented the
March 3rd (search for this): chapter 1
beginning of an organized Catholic society effected in this part of Middlesex County. This same structure is still in use, being a part of the large Church of the Immaculate Conception (then called St. Mary's) which you see today, standing as it does, together with the rectory, on the land provided by those first pioneers. On April 20, 1877, that part of the town of Medford in which this edifice is located was annexed to the town of Maiden by an act of the State Legislature. In 1873, March 3d, it was voted in town meeting in Medford that the sum of $600.00 be appropriated for the Clock on the Catholic Church in Salem street, said clock to become the property of the Town, and the Society to keep the same in proper order and insured for the benefit of the Town. In 1863 Father Ryan died, borne down by the weight of his toil and labor. He was succeeded by the Rev. Thomas Scully, who had been an army chaplain, and while in the South with the Massachusetts soldiers was captured an
March 16th (search for this): chapter 20
tof-town member and the enthusiastic secretary of the New England Historic Genealogical Society, gave a most interesting paper upon Books and Other Things. He illustrated the address by exhibiting a collection of books selected at random from his own library, valuable for historic interest, or as models of the bookmakers' art. December 15 Rev. Frank I. Paradise of Grace Church, Medford, gave a happy, informal talk(illustrated with maps and pictures) on Switzerland; A Model Democracy. March 16 Mrs. Ruth Dame-Coolidge graciously entertained our Society with a paper on the Rise of the Gothic Cathedral. It was a scholarly piece of work, given without manuscript, and held her hearers with strong interest. April 20 Moses W. Mann, who has given of himself so much to our Society, and is the indefatigable editor of the Register, read a paper on Medford Bells, some thirty-six in all, containing, as all his papers do, a fund of information. Mr. Elisha B. Curtis and others gave person
March 18th (search for this): chapter 16
Medford's Latest weather Unusual weather conditions have prevailed of late. The driving rain, hail and thunder storm of Wednesday (A. M.) March 18, and the brief snow storm of March 26, were marked features. At four in the latter afternoon the western sky assumed the strangest color, rivalling the yellow day of 1880, and soon large flakes of snow came. Within a few minutes it grew so dark, there was a general lighting up by everybody and many were deceived as to the hour, scarcely believing their trusted timepieces. But who can describe the matchless beauty of the scene as at sunset the clouds parted, or yet in the evening that followed! Possibly over an inch of snow had fallen, or rather come on the wings of a westerly wind. The writer, out on an errand to Hastings Heights, was impressed with the marvelous scene. Each street was like the long nave of some vast cathedral. All the trees were covered with an immaculate foliage even to their tiniest twigs; their great
March 26th (search for this): chapter 16
Medford's Latest weather Unusual weather conditions have prevailed of late. The driving rain, hail and thunder storm of Wednesday (A. M.) March 18, and the brief snow storm of March 26, were marked features. At four in the latter afternoon the western sky assumed the strangest color, rivalling the yellow day of 1880, and soon large flakes of snow came. Within a few minutes it grew so dark, there was a general lighting up by everybody and many were deceived as to the hour, scarcely believing their trusted timepieces. But who can describe the matchless beauty of the scene as at sunset the clouds parted, or yet in the evening that followed! Possibly over an inch of snow had fallen, or rather come on the wings of a westerly wind. The writer, out on an errand to Hastings Heights, was impressed with the marvelous scene. Each street was like the long nave of some vast cathedral. All the trees were covered with an immaculate foliage even to their tiniest twigs; their great
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