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B. Farrington (search for this): chapter 18
a century old, but we of today remember the sorrowful tones of the Medford bells at the passing of President McKinley. Fifty-eight years the first Medford bell was in service, and on May 10, 1802, the town voted to have a new bell, and that the old one be given in part pay. The contract for its casting was given to Paul Revere and Sons, whose bill of $552.75 was allowed on November 1 of that year. Benjamin Reed was paid $2.50 for bringing up the bell, and Fitch Hall, Joseph Hall and B. Farrington were paid sums aggregating $27.74 for placing it in position. Isaac Floyd was paid $15.83 for six months ringing. On April 1, 1805, the town voted not to pay for ringing the bell every day. In March meeting, 1803, the selectmen were directed to sell the old bell when they could obtain a reasonable price, and this is the last information we have of the first Medford bell. Evidently Medford did not pay cash in those days, as on January 2, 1804, the selectmen gave an order to Rever
George Washington (search for this): chapter 18
l ever placed on a Medford meeting-house was ever accorded such a reception, both adverse and kindly, as was this. After a time the city clock was arranged to strike each hour on this memorial bell. The city's bells are mainly those of the fire-alarm service. The one longest in use is that hanging in the graceful tower of the brick fire station on Salem, near Park street. It was purchased in 1856 (to replace the school bell destroyed by fire), but placed instead on the engine house of Washington (No. 3) Engine. Hooper & Co. furnished it at a cost of $238.42, and for sixteen years it was Medford's only fire-alarm bell. When the new house was built the bell was divested of its hangings and suspended from a beam in the tower, from which it sends out its warning tones simultaneously with all the others. When this bell was first hung, the first steam fire engine had just been built and was looked upon with little favor by the volunteer firemen of those days. The next fire bell t
John Brooks (search for this): chapter 18
lley, and doubtless its warning peals rang out after Revere galloped by, one hundred and thirty-nine years ago yesterday morning, on his way to Menotomy and Lexington. But ere this the third meeting-house had been built on another spot, and the bell hung in its towering steeple. The eighteenth century was old, its last year young (but thirteen days), when Medford people assembled for their tribute of respect to Washington, each wearing the tokens of mourning. His companion-in-arms, Gen. John Brooks, pronounced the eulogy in the black-draped meeting-house, and as the people dispersed, the bell was tolled until the sun went down. Its echoes are more than a century old, but we of today remember the sorrowful tones of the Medford bells at the passing of President McKinley. Fifty-eight years the first Medford bell was in service, and on May 10, 1802, the town voted to have a new bell, and that the old one be given in part pay. The contract for its casting was given to Paul Rever
Clara Ransom (search for this): chapter 18
eld in the chapel. The college magazine The Graduate, from which information is gathered. says of it— Professor Lewis grasped the dramatic possibilities of a dedicatory service in which the bell itself should play a speaking part. The program began with an invocation, and the class song was sung by Frank Lincoln Pierce, who sang it on the ‘98 Class Day. The president of the class, John Albert Cousins, next presented the bell, which was accepted by President Hamilton. The ode was by Clara Ransom of ‘98, for Tufts was then co-educational. Passages from Schiller's Lay of the Bell were next sung, and at the words, She is moving, sways, sways, the first stroke of the bell was given by the college president. Then followed the Act of Dedication—To Prayer, to Mourning, to Work, to Jubilation, and as the Voice of Alma Mater by the president. At each pronouncement there was response by the choir and bell. During all the exercises the audience had been seated. It now arose and joi
ars since, which were published in the Medford Mercury, followed in later years by others, in all eleven or twelve. The earliest record we have of any meeting-house bell in Medford is in 1740, when an effort was made to purchase a bell that Mr. Dolbear had for sale. Mr. Dolbear was a Boston merchant at Dock square. Nothing seems to have come of this, however. Historian Brooks mentions the fact that the town had a stock of bricks, but as these were not sold the bell was not bought. He recoMr. Dolbear was a Boston merchant at Dock square. Nothing seems to have come of this, however. Historian Brooks mentions the fact that the town had a stock of bricks, but as these were not sold the bell was not bought. He records that some liberal gentlemen provided a bell in 1744. The ringer was paid five pounds for a year's service. This bell was on the second meeting-house beside Marrabel's brook. The bell was placed in a turret or cupola that surmounted the pyramidal roof, and the bellrope hung in the middle of the house in the alley, just as it does today in the old Hingham meeting-house, built in 1681. Medford had then been settled one hundred and fourteen years, and without doubt this first Medford bell
neath the wave, To show the world enduring faith In what the Holy Scripture saith; Swell, swell, ye waters, swell, Rang deep and strong the Baptist bell. On May 13, 1906, a unique service was held in the room over the carriage porch of the First Baptist Church. The Pastor read a psalm, each of the deacons offered a prayer, then the clergyman followed in one of greater length, and the roomful of people sang All hail the power of Jesus' name. At the appointed time an experienced ringer (Mr. Peak) carefully tilted or set the bell, and the rope was placed in the hands of Miss Alice Curtis by her father, with the injunction to pull, which she did. Slowly at first, but with gathering momentum, the 2,040-lb. bell swung around, and out on the breezy morning air came its sonorous vibrations in the key of E. Mr. Curtis grasped the rope, gave a few vigorous pulls, and resigned it to the ringer to finish the duty of the time. The brief service in the tower was a fitting prelude to the m
James O. Curtis (search for this): chapter 18
ch a title I have failed to learn, but such was the name given to the ship-yard bell that, placed on the building of James O. Curtis, was rung at the hours of labor's commencing and close, in the days when times were busy along the Mystic river. Wh remained silent. But, in 1877, the town built a schoolhouse near Malden line, which was called the Curtis school, and Mr. Curtis donated to it the shipyard bell. It hangs in an iron yoke, with a solid wheel of wood for the bell-rope. The tongue ome an experienced ringer (Mr. Peak) carefully tilted or set the bell, and the rope was placed in the hands of Miss Alice Curtis by her father, with the injunction to pull, which she did. Slowly at first, but with gathering momentum, the 2,040-lb. bell swung around, and out on the breezy morning air came its sonorous vibrations in the key of E. Mr. Curtis grasped the rope, gave a few vigorous pulls, and resigned it to the ringer to finish the duty of the time. The brief service in the tower
David Osgood (search for this): chapter 18
. I have quoted the above from Revere Bells, by Dr. Arthur H. Nichols of Boston. Dr. Nichols was grossly misinformed in the matter by a Medford man, and only learned of the error after his book had found a place in the library of the Medford Historical Society. He at once conceded the accuracy of the Medford records of selectmen and town treasurer as authority, instead of the letter received by him, which he has on file (the writer of which has passed on). The long pastorate of Dr. David Osgood ended in 1822. Respect and love for their pastor had held the varying elements together for some years, though the parting of their ways was near. The Methodist Episcopalians had begun to hold public worship before the separation in the First Parish took place. Soon a new house of worship was erected by the Trinitarian or Second Congregational Church for its use. Six years later (1830) twenty-two persons contributed the sum of $640, feeling that the cause of religion would be pr
Benjamin Reed was paid $2.50 for bringing up the bell, and Fitch Hall, Joseph Hall and B. Farrington were paid sums aggregating $27.74 for placing it in position. Isaac Floyd was paid $15.83 for six months ringing. On April 1, 1805, the town voted not to pay for ringing the bell every day. In March meeting, 1803, the selectmen were directed to sell the old bell when they could obtain a reasonable price, and this is the last information we have of the first Medford bell. Evidently Medford did not pay cash in those days, as on January 2, 1804, the selectmen gave an order to Revere and Sons for $31.74 interest on their bill for the bell. In 1810 this second Medford bell had an associate in public service in the steeple of the third meeting-house. Hon. Peter C. Brooks presented the town a tower clock. This was accepted by the selectmen, who communicated to him the thanks of the town, entering the same on the records. Twenty-nine years the clock measured the passing hours
Isaac Floyd (search for this): chapter 18
ells at the passing of President McKinley. Fifty-eight years the first Medford bell was in service, and on May 10, 1802, the town voted to have a new bell, and that the old one be given in part pay. The contract for its casting was given to Paul Revere and Sons, whose bill of $552.75 was allowed on November 1 of that year. Benjamin Reed was paid $2.50 for bringing up the bell, and Fitch Hall, Joseph Hall and B. Farrington were paid sums aggregating $27.74 for placing it in position. Isaac Floyd was paid $15.83 for six months ringing. On April 1, 1805, the town voted not to pay for ringing the bell every day. In March meeting, 1803, the selectmen were directed to sell the old bell when they could obtain a reasonable price, and this is the last information we have of the first Medford bell. Evidently Medford did not pay cash in those days, as on January 2, 1804, the selectmen gave an order to Revere and Sons for $31.74 interest on their bill for the bell. In 1810 this s
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