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Glendower (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
. With a firm grasp and a quick horizontal pull upon the proper ropes (attached to the bell tongues) the player renders the various airs of his repertory. Excellent as is this chime, and beautiful as is the architectural design of Grace Church, it is to be regretted that these bells are so near the ground, and below the steep roof of the edifice. Were they in a campanile, like that of Goddard Chapel, at Tufts College (even though not on a hill), their tones might, like the bells of Shandon Sound so grand on The pleasant waters of the river—Mystic, and be more plainly heard, and to a greater distance, than they are. The knells for the dead are tolled on thetenor bell by a muffled hammer, upon the approach of a funeral cortege, otherwise the full chime is used, as the varied music demands. It is said that their first use was on a wedding occasion. The names of the various players are to me unknown, save that on the occasion of my visit of inspection Mr. Clarence Bearse was
Mystick River (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
nd Mr. Hooper recalls his juvenile experience at the bell-rope, with the only school bell the town of Medford ever bought. Next came two other bells, at about the same time, about which we may not be exact. One was the Old Bughorn. Of the significance of such a title I have failed to learn, but such was the name given to the ship-yard bell that, placed on the building of James O. Curtis, was rung at the hours of labor's commencing and close, in the days when times were busy along the Mystic river. When the ship-building business declined, the bell was disused, and for years remained silent. But, in 1877, the town built a schoolhouse near Malden line, which was called the Curtis school, and Mr. Curtis donated to it the shipyard bell. It hangs in an iron yoke, with a solid wheel of wood for the bell-rope. The tongue of this bell is somewhat peculiar, in that it swings in all directions. This is a small bell, 14 inches high and 19 inches diameter. An ornamental design encircles
Lake Superior (New York, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
reading in the morning paper that this bell had fallen to the stone floor of the chapel, owing to the vigorous ringing of the Jackson College girls, in jubilation about Tufts' victory over Bowdoin in the foot-ball game. But like other newspaper reports, a slight accident was much overdrawn. The girls had two strings to their bow, i.e., the bell rope and the cord of the tolling hammer, and the two do not work properly together. The composition of this bell is seventy-eight per cent. Lake Superior copper and twenty-two per cent. imported tin. It weighs 1,001 lbs., is 116 inches in circumference at the sound bow, and its medium tone is A. The inscription cast upon the bell is— Tufts College given in June, 1908 by the class of 1898 Pax-et-Lux The dedication, in which over thirty persons took part, is commemorated by a bronze tablet set in the outer doorway of the chapel tower. All the other bells we have mentioned were, and are, of a similar composition of copper and tin, k
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 18
ing the people to the dedication of the new church. The hours of the tower clock, the city's property, are also struck on this bell. Over a century ago the New England Glass Works were established in East Cambridge. After fifty years the business had so increased as to require extensive buildings and a small army of workmen. As there entered into the possibility of purchase of a first Medford bell the item of bricks, it is fitting to mention the bell upon the boarding-house of the New England Brick Company at Glenwood. At various intervals in the brick-making season it used to wake the workmen and call them to their meals, and mark the hours of workst gratifying. In old England, in the great cathedral churches, were peals and chimes of bells, and the ringing of them became an art. After the settlement of New England the bell on the meeting-house became a necessity, though preceded by the drum-beat, or blast upon a conch shell. The first chime, or ring of bells, was that
Glenwood, Mills County, Iowa (Iowa, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
e to the new station on Harvard avenue, was suspended from a steel beam in the cupola of the building. The newest bells are those on the stations on Spring and Medford streets, these weighing 1,800 and 2,000 lbs. respectively. The former (at Glenwood) was purchased in 1890 at a total cost for bell and striker of $833.43. The latter bell cost $385.23, with $450 for the striking apparatus and setting the same. Both these bells hang suspended by the crown, and though supplied with the usual to bell more definite information will appear elsewhere. As there entered into the possibility of purchase of a first Medford bell the item of bricks, it is fitting to mention the bell upon the boarding-house of the New England Brick Company at Glenwood. At various intervals in the brick-making season it used to wake the workmen and call them to their meals, and mark the hours of working time. It is the only existing Medford bell that the writer has not seen and examined at close range. It h
Boston (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
ond Parish Church on High street, which was, that the free use of the bell thereon should be granted for public ringing, the town had paid for its use, after its removal to its present location, more than enough to buy a bell. The bell at South Medford has this inscription, City of Medford Fire Department, Arthur C. Symmes, Chief Engineer, 1894, but the Central bell has none to denote municipal ownership, but around the crown, Cast by William Blake & Co., formerly H. N. Hooper & Co., Boston, Mass., A. D. 1891. Within a few years it has been suspended as are the others, higher in the tower, but at first was mounted in the usual way, and until the custom was discontinued, was rung at stated hours daily, and also as the curfew bell. All the city bells above enumerated are struck by the electric-alarm system (installed in 1880), as is also the steam gong or whistle upon the Schenk-Adams factory at the western border of the city and within a few feet of the Somerville appendix.
Whitmore Brook (Vermont, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
ilt the bell was divested of its hangings and suspended from a beam in the tower, from which it sends out its warning tones simultaneously with all the others. When this bell was first hung, the first steam fire engine had just been built and was looked upon with little favor by the volunteer firemen of those days. The next fire bell to come was the one at West Medford. This weighed 515 lbs., and was mounted on a temporary framework beside the livery stable of D. K. Richardson near Whitmore brook. At the completion of the fire station on Canal street it was placed in its cupola. Complaint was soon made by firemen who didn't hear its ringing, and the engineers procured a larger bell of 900 lbs., and had the cupola roof raised higher to take it in. William Blake, successor of Hooper & Co., took the first in exchange therefor, and the town paid a small charge for damage to its wheel. When installed it was hung in the usual way for ringing, but when removed a year since to the new
Cincinnati (Ohio, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
nd for years remained silent. But, in 1877, the town built a schoolhouse near Malden line, which was called the Curtis school, and Mr. Curtis donated to it the shipyard bell. It hangs in an iron yoke, with a solid wheel of wood for the bell-rope. The tongue of this bell is somewhat peculiar, in that it swings in all directions. This is a small bell, 14 inches high and 19 inches diameter. An ornamental design encircles its crown, and above it is the inscription, Cast by G. L. Hanks, Cincinnati, Ohio. No mark of weight, tone, or date is discernible upon it, and its weight is probably less than 200 lbs. At present it is, and for many years it has been, the only school bell in Medford. The other bell referred to was the depot bell. Installed, at the opening of the Medford Branch railroad, at first on a little platform at the end of the roof-ridge, it was later housed in a cupola. The old-time style of ringing was similar to that of church bells—ten or fifteen minutes before the
Saint Marks (Kansas, United States) (search for this): chapter 18
mit they are remitted unto them, and whose soever sins ye retain they are retained. St. John XX, 23. No. 3. 725 pounds. B. Marriage bell. Presented by Dudley C. Hall. What therefore God hath joined together let not man put asunder. St. Mark x, 9. No. 4. 637 pounds. C. Holy communion bell. He that eateth my flesh and drinketh my blood, dwelleth in me, and I in him. St. John VI, 5-6. No. 5. 425 pounds. D. Holy Baptism bell. For as many of you as have been baptized Presented by Mrs. Dudley Hall. Peace to the past, joy to the present, welcome to the future. No. 6. 371 pounds. E. children's bell. Suffer the little children to come unto me, and forbid them not; for of such is the kingdom of God. St. Mark x, 14. No. 7. 296 pounds. F. Burial bell. Presented by Mrs. Gorham Brooks and family. Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord. Revelation XIV, 13. No. 8. 217 pounds. F sharp. Christmas bell. In Memoriam. Presented by Josep
Gloucester (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 18
l theirs. The skill of the artisan has been employed in all lands, and in some the results have been most gratifying. In old England, in the great cathedral churches, were peals and chimes of bells, and the ringing of them became an art. After the settlement of New England the bell on the meeting-house became a necessity, though preceded by the drum-beat, or blast upon a conch shell. The first chime, or ring of bells, was that on old Christ Church in Boston, cast by Rudhall of Gloucester, England, and still in use. Whatever I have said, or may say, on the subject of bells (Medford's or others) is on the historical line, and not from any musical knowledge. I have purposely delayed mentioning the excellent chime of nine bells of Grace Church until now. In 1873 municipal appropriation, parish work, individual or memorial liberality, provided for its expense, which was $2,700. These nine bells have an aggregate weight of 5,324 lbs. and are attuned to the key of G, that of th
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