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New Hampshire (New Hampshire, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
e beans went to the right spot. The writer remembers walking from his home a mile and a half away in his first year of housekeeping in 1870—a half loaf sufficed for two—and wrapped in that old-time brown paper kept his hands warm on the homeward journey; and it tasted good, too. Five hundred to one thousand loaves of bread daily was the usual amount made, reaching one thousand four hundred at one time. Five teams were on the road, and in the younger man's time shipments were made to New Hampshire and Maine. The local teams had regular routes and customers, and the baker's wagon's coming was heralded by the jingling of sleigh bells worn by the horses the year round. Many of the grown-ups of Medford will recall their weekly errand to the old bakery for baker's yeast, and the big tub brought into the shop and ladled out by the cent's worth to the waiting crowd. Mr. Withington sold out to Ewen McPherson in 1885, and he later to Mr. Barker, who some years ago gave up the busine
Gravelly Brook (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
ifelong occupation. In recent years his successors placed on their sign, Established 1825. Henry Withington had never learned the trade or business of a baker by apprenticeship, but with good judgment gained by observation, took up the occupation, and with a partner, and employing experienced help, started in business in that year. The ovens that Withington and Lane used were those of some earlier baker and were located in the rear of Mr. Barker's house. This house was moved beyond Gravelly brook in 1846 to make room for the Mystic church. After two years Mr. Lane went out and Mr. Withington continued in business by himself. But on December 25, 1827, he took in another partner, as he married Eunice Blanchard, daughter of the famous Medford innkeeper, the ceremony being performed by the Rev. Caleb Stetson, who had early in that year begun a pastorate in Medford of twenty-one years. They came to live in the house on Salem street, across River street from the ancient burial grou
Maine (Maine, United States) (search for this): chapter 15
o the right spot. The writer remembers walking from his home a mile and a half away in his first year of housekeeping in 1870—a half loaf sufficed for two—and wrapped in that old-time brown paper kept his hands warm on the homeward journey; and it tasted good, too. Five hundred to one thousand loaves of bread daily was the usual amount made, reaching one thousand four hundred at one time. Five teams were on the road, and in the younger man's time shipments were made to New Hampshire and Maine. The local teams had regular routes and customers, and the baker's wagon's coming was heralded by the jingling of sleigh bells worn by the horses the year round. Many of the grown-ups of Medford will recall their weekly errand to the old bakery for baker's yeast, and the big tub brought into the shop and ladled out by the cent's worth to the waiting crowd. Mr. Withington sold out to Ewen McPherson in 1885, and he later to Mr. Barker, who some years ago gave up the business, since whic
Henry Withingtons (search for this): chapter 15
hat it was over 230 years, which would place it prior to 1656, thus antedating the earliest authentic house in Medford. Be that as it may, they were two very old houses, and it is not in the scope of this article to work out the problem of their genesis, nor yet of the alterations, additions and moving thither that brought them into their final and familiar shape. It is of the business there conducted and of its promoters that we deal, now a timely subject. There have been three Henry Withingtons. The first appears on the Medford tax list first in 1799, and lived in the old brick building called the College, which faced the river on the way to Blanchard's, afterward called Ship street. There the second Henry was born on August 9, 1800, just prior to the beginning of ship building by Thatcher Magoun. The old mill beside the river, and the lighters and molasses-laden vessels to the distillery, had his boyish attention, and perhaps he may have assisted his father at the toll-gat
Henry Withington (search for this): chapter 15
The Withington bakery. DURING the first week in May the old buildings so long the home of tlaced on their sign, Established 1825. Henry Withington had never learned the trade or business oed in business in that year. The ovens that Withington and Lane used were those of some earlier bak. After two years Mr. Lane went out and Mr. Withington continued in business by himself. But on ears ago moved next the common. In 1830 Mr. Withington moved into the old house now demolished, lMedford Historical Society's building. Henry Withington subsequently erected in the rear of his prated or cracked—hence the name, crackers. Mr. Withington did not originate the Medford cracker. Thhe establishing of the business in 1825 by Mr. Withington seems to have been a survival of the fittethe old marketplace. In 1862 the third Henry Withington, whose birth has been mentioned, succeede the cent's worth to the waiting crowd. Mr. Withington sold out to Ewen McPherson in 1885, and he[1 more...]
Thatcher Magoun (search for this): chapter 15
ther that brought them into their final and familiar shape. It is of the business there conducted and of its promoters that we deal, now a timely subject. There have been three Henry Withingtons. The first appears on the Medford tax list first in 1799, and lived in the old brick building called the College, which faced the river on the way to Blanchard's, afterward called Ship street. There the second Henry was born on August 9, 1800, just prior to the beginning of ship building by Thatcher Magoun. The old mill beside the river, and the lighters and molasses-laden vessels to the distillery, had his boyish attention, and perhaps he may have assisted his father at the toll-gate on the Andover turnpike a mile from the market-place. Evidently his youthful mind did not fix itself on his father's trade, that of a cordwainer or shoemaker, for he found employment in the household of Hon. Timothy Bigelow. As scullion, he styled himself, and perhaps his service in Squire Bigelow's hous
gment gained by observation, took up the occupation, and with a partner, and employing experienced help, started in business in that year. The ovens that Withington and Lane used were those of some earlier baker and were located in the rear of Mr. Barker's house. This house was moved beyond Gravelly brook in 1846 to make room for the Mystic church. After two years Mr. Lane went out and Mr. Withington continued in business by himself. But on December 25, 1827, he took in another partner, asof Medford will recall their weekly errand to the old bakery for baker's yeast, and the big tub brought into the shop and ladled out by the cent's worth to the waiting crowd. Mr. Withington sold out to Ewen McPherson in 1885, and he later to Mr. Barker, who some years ago gave up the business, since which time little or nothing has been done there, the last occupants of the shop being the Order of Moose, whatever that may be. The dwelling was occupied until the last, the occupants only removi
Harriet W. Brown (search for this): chapter 15
lasses gingerbread, seed-cakes and buns. The younger added oyster, oatmeal, graham and soda biscuit to the cracker list, and various kinds of pies. Of the latter, Washington was the specialty. He used, in August, to lay in a season's supply of raspberry jam, a half ton in hundredpound cans. This pie was of the George variety, as in those days the Booker had not attained the present popularity. To keep the output of the bakery ready on time, there was a night and day force of workmen. Brown bread was made in four sizes, ten to forty cents, and sold whole, half or quarter. Six hundred and fifty loaves were sold on Sunday, but no beans, i.e., they were not in the stock. But if they didn't know beans in stock, they did in the oven, for more than one hundred Medford housewives sent theirs prepared for baking on Saturday evening, and received a tin check therefor. The check number was chalked on the bean-pots, and the payment of ten cents secured the finished product for the Sund
Caleb Stetson (search for this): chapter 15
business in that year. The ovens that Withington and Lane used were those of some earlier baker and were located in the rear of Mr. Barker's house. This house was moved beyond Gravelly brook in 1846 to make room for the Mystic church. After two years Mr. Lane went out and Mr. Withington continued in business by himself. But on December 25, 1827, he took in another partner, as he married Eunice Blanchard, daughter of the famous Medford innkeeper, the ceremony being performed by the Rev. Caleb Stetson, who had early in that year begun a pastorate in Medford of twenty-one years. They came to live in the house on Salem street, across River street from the ancient burial ground, which was over thirty years ago moved next the common. In 1830 Mr. Withington moved into the old house now demolished, leasing it for five years. He had then a daughter, born April 20, 1829. He transferred his baking operations to the shop and ovens formerly of Convers Francis, which were in the rear of t
learned the trade or business of a baker by apprenticeship, but with good judgment gained by observation, took up the occupation, and with a partner, and employing experienced help, started in business in that year. The ovens that Withington and Lane used were those of some earlier baker and were located in the rear of Mr. Barker's house. This house was moved beyond Gravelly brook in 1846 to make room for the Mystic church. After two years Mr. Lane went out and Mr. Withington continued in Mr. Lane went out and Mr. Withington continued in business by himself. But on December 25, 1827, he took in another partner, as he married Eunice Blanchard, daughter of the famous Medford innkeeper, the ceremony being performed by the Rev. Caleb Stetson, who had early in that year begun a pastorate in Medford of twenty-one years. They came to live in the house on Salem street, across River street from the ancient burial ground, which was over thirty years ago moved next the common. In 1830 Mr. Withington moved into the old house now demolis
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