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to have been made by some of the Plymouth Pilgrims in September, 1621, who said, Within this bay the salvages say there are two rivers: one whereof we saw having a fair entrance but we had no time to discover it. Later comes Johnson, who in his Wonder-Working Providence in describing Charlestown, tells of the pleasant and navigable river of Mistick, using the name that Governor Winthrop wrote in his diary under date of June 17, 1630, We went up Mystick River about six miles. Dudley, in his letter to the Countess of Lincoln on March 28, 1631, tells of settlers at Watertown, on the Charles river, and some of us upon Mistick, which we called Meadford. And again Winthrop tells— The Governor and others went over Mistic River at Medford two or three miles among the rocks to a very great pond which they called Spot Pond. In these three instances, the earliest known, the river is called by name, the name the aboriginal dwellers gave it, Missi-tuk, abbreviated a
later all her remaining territory outside the peninsula became the town of Somerville. Winthrop and his companions saw the red man's Missituk in its primitive solitude, fordable at the Indian trails, its broad marshes where is now Chelsea and Everett, its upper reaches bordered with wooded hills and level plains. He knew nothing of its tributary streams, nor yet of the territory through which they flowed, but his contemporaries soon learned something of it. Johnson, whom we have already years (down stream, and not in Medford bounds) Chelsea bridge and those of the Eastern, and Boston and Maine railroads. In recent years the Canal, Armory, Auburn street-Parkway, and Metropolitan pipe bridge, and just now the Boston Elevated to Everett, complete the list of fourteen now in use and two discontinued and removed. It had been our purpose to present views of all these, but conditions forbid. We can only refer our readers to the engineer's report (September 21, 1904) on the Impr
who said, Within this bay the salvages say there are two rivers: one whereof we saw having a fair entrance but we had no time to discover it. Later comes Johnson, who in his Wonder-Working Providence in describing Charlestown, tells of the pleasant and navigable river of Mistick, using the name that Governor Winthrop wrotevel plains. He knew nothing of its tributary streams, nor yet of the territory through which they flowed, but his contemporaries soon learned something of it. Johnson, whom we have already quoted, describes Woburn (Charlestown village) thus, as the highest of the yet peopled land neere upon the head springs of many confider Since the preparation of this article there came to us in an exchange an interesting article concerning the name of the upper river that the earliest historian, Johnson, called the first rise of the Mistick, which we reproduce as pertinent to this subject. We do not, however, think that the Indians of this valley or locality, th
Pilgrims in September, 1621, who said, Within this bay the salvages say there are two rivers: one whereof we saw having a fair entrance but we had no time to discover it. Later comes Johnson, who in his Wonder-Working Providence in describing Charlestown, tells of the pleasant and navigable river of Mistick, using the name that Governor Winthrop wrote in his diary under date of June 17, 1630, We went up Mystick River about six miles. Dudley, in his letter to the Countess of Lincoln on March 28, 1631, tells of settlers at Watertown, on the Charles river, and some of us upon Mistick, which we called Meadford. And again Winthrop tells— The Governor and others went over Mistic River at Medford two or three miles among the rocks to a very great pond which they called Spot Pond. In these three instances, the earliest known, the river is called by name, the name the aboriginal dwellers gave it, Missi-tuk, abbreviated and modified a little to suit the English
Zachariah Symmes (search for this): chapter 19
Charlestown water supply. Seven additional drawbridges would have added nothing to the beauty of the scene, and as the monitors soon became obsolete, it was well the project was abandoned and the lower lake did not become a floating junk-yard. Another project that failed was, in 1876, the Mystic Valley railroad that began to fill an embankment requiring a bridge across the old course of the Aberjona at the upper end of the lake. This, the upper reach of the Mystic (and sometimes called Symmes' river) had been crossed by the long wooden aqueduct of the canal in 1802, replaced by the substantial stone structure of 1827, removed in 1865, as was also the Symmes dam and waterpower the same year. If we trace the stream farther up we go beyond old Medford bounds and out of Upper Medford, as it used to be called. We will find that our neighboring town of Winchester has improved its flow through her territory, making it permanently ornamental, adding much to its attractiveness. And
Spot Pond (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
of Mistick, using the name that Governor Winthrop wrote in his diary under date of June 17, 1630, We went up Mystick River about six miles. Dudley, in his letter to the Countess of Lincoln on March 28, 1631, tells of settlers at Watertown, on the Charles river, and some of us upon Mistick, which we called Meadford. And again Winthrop tells— The Governor and others went over Mistic River at Medford two or three miles among the rocks to a very great pond which they called Spot Pond. In these three instances, the earliest known, the river is called by name, the name the aboriginal dwellers gave it, Missi-tuk, abbreviated and modified a little to suit the English lips. The Indian name of the Charles river was Quinobequin, the adjective quin meaning long, and certainly appropriate. Trumbull gives the origin of Mistick thus— Tuk in Indian denotes a river whose waters are driven in waves by the tides or winds. With the adjective missi, great, it forms Missi-t
Charles (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
using the name that Governor Winthrop wrote in his diary under date of June 17, 1630, We went up Mystick River about six miles. Dudley, in his letter to the Countess of Lincoln on March 28, 1631, tells of settlers at Watertown, on the Charles river, and some of us upon Mistick, which we called Meadford. And again Winthrop tells— The Governor and others went over Mistic River at Medford two or three miles among the rocks to a very great pond which they called Spot Pond. In these three instances, the earliest known, the river is called by name, the name the aboriginal dwellers gave it, Missi-tuk, abbreviated and modified a little to suit the English lips. The Indian name of the Charles river was Quinobequin, the adjective quin meaning long, and certainly appropriate. Trumbull gives the origin of Mistick thus— Tuk in Indian denotes a river whose waters are driven in waves by the tides or winds. With the adjective missi, great, it forms Missi-tuk, the nam
Mystick River (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
st mention of our river is said to have been made by some of the Plymouth Pilgrims in September, 1621, who said, Within this bay the salvages say there are two rivers: one whereof we saw having a fair entrance but we had no time to discover it. Later comes Johnson, who in his Wonder-Working Providence in describing Charlestown, tells of the pleasant and navigable river of Mistick, using the name that Governor Winthrop wrote in his diary under date of June 17, 1630, We went up Mystick River about six miles. Dudley, in his letter to the Countess of Lincoln on March 28, 1631, tells of settlers at Watertown, on the Charles river, and some of us upon Mistick, which we called Meadford. And again Winthrop tells— The Governor and others went over Mistic River at Medford two or three miles among the rocks to a very great pond which they called Spot Pond. In these three instances, the earliest known, the river is called by name, the name the aboriginal dwellers g
Stoneham (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
fe of Mistick river and ponds. Evidently this ancient historian, settler and man of affairs, considered the Aberjona the main stream, and its head waters away up in Wilmington the first rife of the Mistick. But another has its source away on the hills in Woburn near Lexington line, and coming down through the picturesque Shaker glen, receives the tributaries, lingers a while in Horn pond (Lake Innitou) and Wedge Pond (Echo Lake), and joins the Aberjona in Winchester. Still another in Stoneham reaches the main stream two miles farther up in Montvale. On the Aberjona, Edward Converse built one of the earliest grist mills in the colony, and only recently has the power ceased to be used. Still, the fall remains, but as an ornamental feature. There were as many as fourteen mill privileges on this Aberjona and its tributaries. Two other brooks contribute to the flow of the Mistick pond, the Squa Sachem and Sucker brook. The latter rises in Lexington, and in its course turned
Boston Bay (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
certainly appropriate. Trumbull gives the origin of Mistick thus— Tuk in Indian denotes a river whose waters are driven in waves by the tides or winds. With the adjective missi, great, it forms Missi-tuk, the name of the great river of Boston Bay. Even a cursory glance at the early maps, and especially at one of latest survey on which the ancient lines are drawn, Cambridge Historical Society Publication VII. will show the fitness of the aboriginal names, for of the two rivers the salvages told the Pilgrim scouts of, one was the long river and the other the great wave—and wind-driven river of Boston bay. But perhaps someone asks, Why Mystic river? We reply, The river has nothing mystical or mysterious, and the name as spelled, Mystic, is a misnomer. It has come to be thus commonly spelled because of the identical sound of the letters i and y, and the dropping of the k, which in time was superfluous to the c which the English had introduced. (Note also Merrimack—Mer<
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