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Linnville (Missouri, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
also from the colony record; third, Mistick, from Josselyn, is of Indian origin. The second was proprietary, but would of necessity be in time outgrown and disused. The third was official and remains. But why Medford? Towns are named by official, i.e., by governmental, executive or legislative action, in honor or memory of persons or places, as well as peculiarities. In those early days the incorporating words were few; as witness, Charlestown Village is called Wooburne, Sagust is called Linn. But we search the colony records in vain to find that Mr. Cradock's farm is called Medford; and literally speaking, the early Medford was never incorporated. Like Topsy, she simply growed. Still the fact remains that in September, 1630, a tax of three pounds had been laid upon a place designated by the General Court as Medford and again we ask why Medford? When and by whom previously? There are no local records to search—really none till 1674. Neither were there any dictagraphs in thos
Salem (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
r. Cradock's farm, the early Medford. The seventeenth of June, 1630, is commonly accepted, and two hundred and seventy-five years after was celebrated, as the time of settlement, and again we may ask why. Because Governor Winthrop wrote, We went up Mistick river about six miles. But Winthrop did not settle in Medford but in Charlestown, on the other side of the river. However, as seen in Deputy Governor Dudley's letter (of March 28, 1631) to the Countess of Lincoln, of those coming from Salem, some found a good place upon Mistick, which we named Meadford. Here then is the earliest authentic account we have of the naming of Medford. Again in our search we ask why Medford and answer our own query, thus—Because the good place upon Mistick was to be Mr. Cradock's farm, and they so called it, from Medford in Staffordshire in the old England they came from, and which old shire Mr. Cradock had represented in Parliament since 1620, the eighteenth year of the reign of James the first.
Winter Hill (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 11
. Meadowford would not have been an inappropriate designation for a specific place in the river's course; but ancient Medford or Mr. Cradock's farm was four miles long. Now a few words relative to Metford, and copy of a written note attached to a copy of the History of Medford (Brooks) by Caleb Swan, which is of interest, and never before published. Medford, July 31, 1857. Mr. Charles Brooks (the author of this book) dining with us at Dr. Swan's today—Mrs Adams and daughter of Winter hill being present—said that he had lately ascertained that the original name of the town was Metford—after a county seat Governor Cradock in England in Staffordshire called Metford and that he named his new town from that and that in his will he called it Metford in New England. The above date is two years subsequent to the publication of the book which contains many other interesting notes and is the property of the Medford Historical Society. In Staffordshire Names and Places p. 10 (<
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 11
that he had lately ascertained that the original name of the town was Metford—after a county seat Governor Cradock in England in Staffordshire called Metford and that he named his new town from that and that in his will he called it Metford in New England. The above date is two years subsequent to the publication of the book which contains many other interesting notes and is the property of the Medford Historical Society. In Staffordshire Names and Places p. 10 (1902) we find Meafordnd probably now, Meaford —all this variety of spelling (possibly not of pronunciation) in staid old England. Somehow we fancy that e has its short sound in all, as a recent comer from Staffordshire pronounces the present Meaford Mefford. The New England town, now a city of 37,000 people, has almost from its earliest days been called Medford and sixteen others in as many states bear the name spelled in the same way and more or less traceable thereto. We have tried to answer the query on lin
Meaford (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 11
f the Medford Historical Society. In Staffordshire Names and Places p. 10 (1902) we find Meaford, 1 1/2 m. N. W. of Stone D Domesday Book. Mepford, Metford; 1173 Medford; 1251, later Mefford. Meaford lies on the Trent, where it is crossed by the great road from London to the N. W. The terminal ford doubtless applies to the passage of the river. Despite the D. Domesday Book. formeadow-ford is not a satisfactory interpretation. There is a small stream running into Trent at Meaford and Med may represent its ancient name. In Surveys of Staffordshire Preface p. XVI is mentied Medford. In 1251 it was still Medford, later it was Mefford; and in 1892, and probably now, Meaford —all this variety of spelling (possibly not of pronunciation) in staid old England. Somehow wethat e has its short sound in all, as a recent comer from Staffordshire pronounces the present Meaford Mefford. The New England town, now a city of 37,000 people, has almost from its earliest days b
Staffordshire (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 11
good place upon Mistick was to be Mr. Cradock's farm, and they so called it, from Medford in Staffordshire in the old England they came from, and which old shire Mr. Cradock had represented in Parliathe original name of the town was Metford—after a county seat Governor Cradock in England in Staffordshire called Metford and that he named his new town from that and that in his will he called it Meream running into Trent at Meaford and Med may represent its ancient name. In Surveys of Staffordshire Preface p. XVI is mention by a contemporary diarist, of R. Caverswall house Mr Cradock oid old England. Somehow we fancy that e has its short sound in all, as a recent comer from Staffordshire pronounces the present Meaford Mefford. The New England town, now a city of 37,000 people, hd by the accommodating showman, Just which you pleases, little dears, you pays your money and you takes your choice. Our choice is, Medford got its name from Medford in Staffordshire, Old Englan
John Adams (search for this): chapter 11
n uniformly written Medford. Meadowford would not have been an inappropriate designation for a specific place in the river's course; but ancient Medford or Mr. Cradock's farm was four miles long. Now a few words relative to Metford, and copy of a written note attached to a copy of the History of Medford (Brooks) by Caleb Swan, which is of interest, and never before published. Medford, July 31, 1857. Mr. Charles Brooks (the author of this book) dining with us at Dr. Swan's today—Mrs Adams and daughter of Winter hill being present—said that he had lately ascertained that the original name of the town was Metford—after a county seat Governor Cradock in England in Staffordshire called Metford and that he named his new town from that and that in his will he called it Metford in New England. The above date is two years subsequent to the publication of the book which contains many other interesting notes and is the property of the Medford Historical Society. In Staffordshi<
Matthew Cradock (search for this): chapter 11
ttal from the charge in November. But one of Cradock's servants held variant opinion and sought to's entrance into the limelight of history. Mr. Cradock's farm was a tract of land a mile wide (appt, Medford, from the colony record; second, Mr. Cradock's farm, also from the colony record; third,rch the colony records in vain to find that Mr. Cradock's farm is called Medford; and literally spealready noted the geographical situation of Mr. Cradock's farm, the early Medford. The seventeencause the good place upon Mistick was to be Mr. Cradock's farm, and they so called it, from MedfordEngland they came from, and which old shire Mr. Cradock had represented in Parliament since 1620, t the town was Metford—after a county seat Governor Cradock in England in Staffordshire called Metforemporary diarist, of R. Caverswall house Mr Cradock owns it. And elsewhere in same book is was by men in the employ and interest of Matthew Cradock, merchant of London. He was the first go[3 more...]
went up Mistick river about six miles. But Winthrop did not settle in Medford but in Charlestown, on the other side of the river. However, as seen in Deputy Governor Dudley's letter (of March 28, 1631) to the Countess of Lincoln, of those coming from Salem, some found a good place upon Mistick, which we named Meadford. Here then and which old shire Mr. Cradock had represented in Parliament since 1620, the eighteenth year of the reign of James the first. As we had no dictagraph record of Dudley's pronunciation, we have naturally considered that M-e-a-d was called phonetically Meed, and so has come the usual interpretation of Medford, as Meadow-ford, thouo at Dr. Swan's dinner-table (also alluded to by the English diarist quoted) may have prompted him to call the new plantation he was starting, Medford or Metford. Dudley, his associate and successor in office, writes which we named Meadford, thus differing slightly in possible pronunciation. Whether d or t is of little moment b
Katharine H. Stone (search for this): chapter 11
ertained that the original name of the town was Metford—after a county seat Governor Cradock in England in Staffordshire called Metford and that he named his new town from that and that in his will he called it Metford in New England. The above date is two years subsequent to the publication of the book which contains many other interesting notes and is the property of the Medford Historical Society. In Staffordshire Names and Places p. 10 (1902) we find Meaford, 1 1/2 m. N. W. of Stone D Domesday Book. Mepford, Metford; 1173 Medford; 1251, later Mefford. Meaford lies on the Trent, where it is crossed by the great road from London to the N. W. The terminal ford doubtless applies to the passage of the river. Despite the D. Domesday Book. forms the prefix may be accepted as Med which is difficult to interpret. It may represent A. S. Anglo Saxon. maed, a meadow, but meadow-ford is not a satisfactory interpretation. There is a small stream running into Trent at M
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