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Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
first decade of the nineteenth century, with the establishment of ship-building, there was an increase of 316 in the population, but in the second decade but 34. If the increase of population was small in those latter years, the reverse was true of the new industry, for while 16 vessels were built in the first decade, 60 were built in the second, though there were but three in 1819. In that year James Monroe was president of the United States and Gen. John Brooks of Medford governor of Massachusetts, having been elected for the fourth time, receiving 215 of his townsmen's votes, out of a total of 240 cast. The outline of Medford's territory was larger then than now; its social, educational and civic center was the meeting-house, its business center the marketplace where the country road from Boston divided north to Woburn and east to Malden and Salem, and were the principal public roads (not given names as yet), though two turnpike roads had been opened fourteen years before and
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 27
is the Hales' map, made about 1820, See Register, Vol. I, p. 133. and showing the few roads and something of topography. By the former we find location of the meeting-house and mills, but little information relative to housing or business. No newspaper here then, and the bi-weeklies of Boston had but rare allusion to Medford matters. One hundred and eighty-nine years had rolled away since the first settlement of the town, and yet Medford in 1819, separated from the metropolis of New England by but one town, and but five miles distant, had less than 1,500 inhabitants. It had been hard hit by the Revolution, but in the first decade of the nineteenth century, with the establishment of ship-building, there was an increase of 316 in the population, but in the second decade but 34. If the increase of population was small in those latter years, the reverse was true of the new industry, for while 16 vessels were built in the first decade, 60 were built in the second, though there
Stoneham (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
for $20.00! But how about $200 for Parson Osgood's supply of wood for the same year, deducted from the $500 salary? Even with the high price of coal in 1919, the average householder today would deem it a hardship to pay $200 for a year's fuel, to say nothing of spending two-fifths of his income for warmth. Seth Mayo was one of the tavern-keepers and the town paid him $3.00 for the use of a room for the selectmen. Jonathan Brooks was paid $2.00 for perambulating the town line beside Stoneham. It was a woodland walk, and is today, but it costs more. Luther Stearns and Jonathan Brooks had the disposal of fishing rights in the river for shad and alewives between Medford and Charlestown. (This was from second beach to Wear bridge.) James Ford surveyed eleven tons and fourteen feet of pine timber at ninepence per ton, and $1.40 paid his fee. Probably this was for the great bridge. Timothy Bigelow seems to have been the town's banker, as the selectmen directed the payment
Mill lane (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
n (those of Dr. Stearns and Miss Hannah Swan), but some of their students came from other towns. This record says that two schools for those younger children must be established, one at Brooks' corner [High and Woburn streets] and the other on Mill lane, so-called [Riverside avenue.] The above figures are interesting as showing the average Medford family of a century ago as being of five children, and probably as many over seventeen as under four. But the needed schoolhouse at Brooks' corhat the town paid the teachers' board for the Sundays before and after the summer term, and it was all in the family at Brooks' corner,—and the old house, having taken a new lease of life, is still in evidence. Rhoda Turner's was probably at Mill lane, so called, and all of the above tallies with the action of the town. Here is a breeze from the shipyards: Voted to allow Abner Bartlett's account for money paid for chips and wood for school. Great stuff for kindling and stove wood were
Salem (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 27
re but three in 1819. In that year James Monroe was president of the United States and Gen. John Brooks of Medford governor of Massachusetts, having been elected for the fourth time, receiving 215 of his townsmen's votes, out of a total of 240 cast. The outline of Medford's territory was larger then than now; its social, educational and civic center was the meeting-house, its business center the marketplace where the country road from Boston divided north to Woburn and east to Malden and Salem, and were the principal public roads (not given names as yet), though two turnpike roads had been opened fourteen years before and a canal a few years earlier. Does anyone wish to know what the old town looked like in 1819? Let them look carefully at the few old-time dwellings still remaining, the ancient graveyard and distil-house, the pictures of the third meeting-house, brick schoolhouses and the old Tufts residence, substitute a country road for those of today, eliminate all motive p
United States (United States) (search for this): chapter 27
ants. It had been hard hit by the Revolution, but in the first decade of the nineteenth century, with the establishment of ship-building, there was an increase of 316 in the population, but in the second decade but 34. If the increase of population was small in those latter years, the reverse was true of the new industry, for while 16 vessels were built in the first decade, 60 were built in the second, though there were but three in 1819. In that year James Monroe was president of the United States and Gen. John Brooks of Medford governor of Massachusetts, having been elected for the fourth time, receiving 215 of his townsmen's votes, out of a total of 240 cast. The outline of Medford's territory was larger then than now; its social, educational and civic center was the meeting-house, its business center the marketplace where the country road from Boston divided north to Woburn and east to Malden and Salem, and were the principal public roads (not given names as yet), though two
Rebecca Blanchard (search for this): chapter 27
ill lane, so called, and all of the above tallies with the action of the town. Here is a breeze from the shipyards: Voted to allow Abner Bartlett's account for money paid for chips and wood for school. Great stuff for kindling and stove wood were the chips and blocks from the shipyards, better than the bagwood of today. In the days when the sea was old And the builders lithe and young, From timber that gleamed like gold This carpet of chips was flung. Feb, Voted, to allow Rebecca Blanchard's account for schooling a child of Rufus P [——]24 weeks to Oct 31 last year $3.00 She was one of the schoolmistresses for poor children. At the same meeting 13 in all men were approved as enginemen, and it was Voted to allow Daniel Symms five dollars in full of his account for 46 ladder dogs. . . . Daniel Wait $25.17 for ladders and painting cases. This was in the days of the Grasshopper, and the fire department wasn't motorized. And who shall say that Medford did not encour
es with the action of the town. Here is a breeze from the shipyards: Voted to allow Abner Bartlett's account for money paid for chips and wood for school. Great stuff for kindling and stove wood were the chips and blocks from the shipyards, better than the bagwood of today. In the days when the sea was old And the builders lithe and young, From timber that gleamed like gold This carpet of chips was flung. Feb, Voted, to allow Rebecca Blanchard's account for schooling a child of Rufus P [——]24 weeks to Oct 31 last year $3.00 She was one of the schoolmistresses for poor children. At the same meeting 13 in all men were approved as enginemen, and it was Voted to allow Daniel Symms five dollars in full of his account for 46 ladder dogs. . . . Daniel Wait $25.17 for ladders and painting cases. This was in the days of the Grasshopper, and the fire department wasn't motorized. And who shall say that Medford did not encourage the fine arts? We think it did, for on Feb
Nathan Adams (search for this): chapter 27
there was duplication enough to reduce the number to fifty. It may be noticed there was no school board especially named. The annual town meeting was held in March, hence usually styled the March meeting, and adjourned from time to time as the amount of public business required. At that of 1819, Hon. Timothy Bigelow, who had the experience and distinction of eleven terms as speaker of the Massachusetts House of Representatives, was moderator. Dr. Luther Stearns, Thatcher Magoun and Nathan Adams, three of Medford's prominent citizens, were chosen selectmen, Joseph Manning, treasurer, and Reuben Richards, clerk of the market. These names are evidence that it was a notable and efficient board, as also those that follow in the long list of other officers shown. It is recorded that ere adjournment to April 1, the town clerk was directed to put the law in force against persons chosen who do not qualify. Then follow several pages of certificates of qualification. At the April meeti
Allowed S. Butters (search for this): chapter 27
32.08 Roads and highway bills488.87 Abatement of Taxes258.47 Town Officers150.00 Collecting Taxes270.00 Expenses opposing new road150.00 Interest on town debt141.00 For injury of horse on drawbridge50.00 Sexton 25.00 Miscellaneous expenses 94.56119.56 ——— 4,353.12 Schools750.00 Abated taxes54.94 Town clerk30.00 Assessors214.00244.00 Collector's fee234.52 Expenses new road to Woburn215.50 Interest on town debt141.00 Great bridge256.17 Miscellaneous Expenses29.37 Allowed S. Butters10.00 Cleaning and repair town clock16.00 Hose of engine and town pump8.00 Trees in burying ground13.24 Land damage to widen road38.97 Grant made the singers100.00 ——— 4,418.77 According to Mr. Brooks, the item of support of poor is even arger than that we quote from the town record. But there was still another outlay of which no mention is made. The town had, forty years before from Thomas Seccomb, a gift, the interest of which in perpetuity is applied to the relief o
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