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e prayer of the petitioners for laying out the said turnpike road for a public highway, whenever the said committee shall receive satisfactory assurances that the compensation or damages to be allowed by said commissioners will not be less than $75.00 on each share. The county commissioners declined to take action upon the above petition. At a meeting held April 10 1843, it was voted to pay L. Spaulding for work done on the turnpike for the year ensuing $1.25 per day for April, May, June, July, August, September, October and November, and $1.00 per day for December, January and March, and $100 per day for horse and cart for the year. Also to pay fifty dollars per quarter for tending the toll gate. When the building of the Medford branch railroad was under consideration (1846) the Turnpike Corporation voted to sell the franchise of the corporation to the Boston and Maine Railroad Extension Company (later called the B. & M. Railroad Co.) for the sum of $10,000 including all the dam
public highway, whenever the said committee shall receive satisfactory assurances that the compensation or damages to be allowed by said commissioners will not be less than $75.00 on each share. The county commissioners declined to take action upon the above petition. At a meeting held April 10 1843, it was voted to pay L. Spaulding for work done on the turnpike for the year ensuing $1.25 per day for April, May, June, July, August, September, October and November, and $1.00 per day for December, January and March, and $100 per day for horse and cart for the year. Also to pay fifty dollars per quarter for tending the toll gate. When the building of the Medford branch railroad was under consideration (1846) the Turnpike Corporation voted to sell the franchise of the corporation to the Boston and Maine Railroad Extension Company (later called the B. & M. Railroad Co.) for the sum of $10,000 including all the damage sustained by the railroad crossing said turnpike. September 6, 186
out the said turnpike road for a public highway, whenever the said committee shall receive satisfactory assurances that the compensation or damages to be allowed by said commissioners will not be less than $75.00 on each share. The county commissioners declined to take action upon the above petition. At a meeting held April 10 1843, it was voted to pay L. Spaulding for work done on the turnpike for the year ensuing $1.25 per day for April, May, June, July, August, September, October and November, and $1.00 per day for December, January and March, and $100 per day for horse and cart for the year. Also to pay fifty dollars per quarter for tending the toll gate. When the building of the Medford branch railroad was under consideration (1846) the Turnpike Corporation voted to sell the franchise of the corporation to the Boston and Maine Railroad Extension Company (later called the B. & M. Railroad Co.) for the sum of $10,000 including all the damage sustained by the railroad crossing
September (search for this): chapter 1
etitioners for laying out the said turnpike road for a public highway, whenever the said committee shall receive satisfactory assurances that the compensation or damages to be allowed by said commissioners will not be less than $75.00 on each share. The county commissioners declined to take action upon the above petition. At a meeting held April 10 1843, it was voted to pay L. Spaulding for work done on the turnpike for the year ensuing $1.25 per day for April, May, June, July, August, September, October and November, and $1.00 per day for December, January and March, and $100 per day for horse and cart for the year. Also to pay fifty dollars per quarter for tending the toll gate. When the building of the Medford branch railroad was under consideration (1846) the Turnpike Corporation voted to sell the franchise of the corporation to the Boston and Maine Railroad Extension Company (later called the B. & M. Railroad Co.) for the sum of $10,000 including all the damage sustained by
ghway, whenever the said committee shall receive satisfactory assurances that the compensation or damages to be allowed by said commissioners will not be less than $75.00 on each share. The county commissioners declined to take action upon the above petition. At a meeting held April 10 1843, it was voted to pay L. Spaulding for work done on the turnpike for the year ensuing $1.25 per day for April, May, June, July, August, September, October and November, and $1.00 per day for December, January and March, and $100 per day for horse and cart for the year. Also to pay fifty dollars per quarter for tending the toll gate. When the building of the Medford branch railroad was under consideration (1846) the Turnpike Corporation voted to sell the franchise of the corporation to the Boston and Maine Railroad Extension Company (later called the B. & M. Railroad Co.) for the sum of $10,000 including all the damage sustained by the railroad crossing said turnpike. September 6, 1860, it was
for laying out the said turnpike road for a public highway, whenever the said committee shall receive satisfactory assurances that the compensation or damages to be allowed by said commissioners will not be less than $75.00 on each share. The county commissioners declined to take action upon the above petition. At a meeting held April 10 1843, it was voted to pay L. Spaulding for work done on the turnpike for the year ensuing $1.25 per day for April, May, June, July, August, September, October and November, and $1.00 per day for December, January and March, and $100 per day for horse and cart for the year. Also to pay fifty dollars per quarter for tending the toll gate. When the building of the Medford branch railroad was under consideration (1846) the Turnpike Corporation voted to sell the franchise of the corporation to the Boston and Maine Railroad Extension Company (later called the B. & M. Railroad Co.) for the sum of $10,000 including all the damage sustained by the railr
William Smith (search for this): chapter 1
an's land seven rods to land of Andrew Kettle, and here the road is laid out four rods wide; thence the same course over said Kettle's land ten rods to land of William Smith, and here the road is laid out four rods wide; thence the same course over said Smith's land twenty-seven rods eight links to a stake and stones by the east siSmith's land twenty-seven rods eight links to a stake and stones by the east side of the road opposite Page's tavern near the neck in Charlestown, and here the road is laid out four rods wide. And all the fore-described lines, butts and bounds are in the middle of the said turnpike road, except where said road comes to northeasterly side of the bank of the Middlesex canal, register, Vol. XIII, p. 97 and ufts, Jr., late of Charlestown, deceased, $1.00; Dr. William Stearns, $910.00; Benjamin Frothingham, Jr., $62.50; Samuel Swan, $105.00; Andrew Kettle, $150.00; William Smith, $635.00; making a total of $7,231.00. January 26, 1804, a committee was chosen to consider the expediency of building a hotel. At a subsequent meeting the
return of the warrant to them directed, as follows:— Beginning at a stake and stones on the easterly side of the road, and by land of the heirs of Col. Isaac Royall, deceased, nearly opposite to Dr. Luther Stearns' house in Medford, and running southeasterly over land of said heirs, one hundred and thirty-seven rods and three-quarters of a rod, and here the road is laid out four rods wide; and thence the same course two hundred and forty-one rods and sixteen links to land of the heirs of Thomas Russell, late of Boston, deceased, and here the road is laid six rods wide; thence the same course over the land of the heirs of said Russell ten rods and fourteen links to a stake by land of Elias Haskett Derby, and here the road is laid out six rods wide; thence over land of said Derby, thirty-eight rods and six links to a heap of stones at the point of the rocks, by or near the Middlesex canal, See sketch made by Caleb Swan, register, Vol. XIV, p. 68, also Vol. XIII, p. 97. and here
that a committee be appointed and authorized to purchase a piece of land immediately for the building of a hotel at some future day. Still later another committee was appointed to enquire into the expenses and report a plan for a hotel. No action by the corporation concerning the building of a hotel was taken after the appointment of this committee, as the building of the Medford house commencing about this time obviated the necessity of any further action. The Medford house was built in 1805 and opened as a tavern that same year. February 13, 1804, the standing committee was directed to purchase a piece of land on or near the farm of General Derby and build a house suitable for a toll-man. The committee contracted with Buckman and Wait, carpenters, to build the house at a cost of $300.00. Mr. James Kidder was appointed toll-gatherer, his compensation for the year following to be $350.00 and the use of the house. February 22, 1805, a committee was chosen to attend the General Co
Somerville (search for this): chapter 1
$43,000.00.The number of dividends was 129, but the total amount is not stated in the records. The foregoing history of the Medford Turnpike Corporation is taken largely from the record book of the corporation. It is evident that the undertaking was not a profitable one, and that during the last thirty years of the existence of the corporation it was the main object of the proprietors to rid themselves of the burden of its maintenance. The laying out of Medford street in Medford and Somerville around the southerly side of Winter Hill, thus avoiding the climb over the top of the hill, contributed to reduce the revenue of the company and thus assisted in its final collapse. The turnpike road was used by the sporting portion of the community as a course for the speeding of horses. There was a tree which stood on the southerly side of the road that was just one mile from the old saw and grist mill. The only disadvantages experienced by the sportsmen were the clouds of dust that
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