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rust Company. Following its good example thus set, the Register has sought information from oversea, relative to Medford, Staffordshire. We applied at the British Consulate in Boston and were told It must be a small place, as there is no post office of that name in our list, and were advised to write to Staffordshire County Council. Doing so, we were in due time in receipt of the following:— Meaford—Staffordshire. 27th October, 1921. Dear Sir, I have your letter of the 10th instant desiring information with regard to the above. I do not think I can do better than send you the enclosed extract from Kelly's Directory of this County. The enclosed three pictures may also be of interest to you. Yours faithfully, Eustace Joy, M. A. Meaford. Meaford is a very small village and hamlet near the river Trent, about 1 1/4 miles north-north-west from Stone station, on the Colwich and Stoke section of the North Staffordshire railway, in the Kibblestone quarter of Ston
hat no such expedition would have sallied forth during his lifetime without the leadership of that doughty little pepperpot. Furthermore, as the writer of the Relation speaks always of our doings in the expedition, I suppose that we may conclude that Winslow was of the party—of course, assuming that the future governor wrote this portion of the history. Apparently it is from the Relation, mainly, that we must get particulars of the journey: how that, setting forth in the shallop on the eighteenth, they found the way longer than they expected (being as they estimated it close to twenty leagues), so that they did not arrive within the bay until late on the nineteenth; how they landed on the twentieth on one side of the bay, where they made a treaty with Obbatinewat, after which they sailed across the bay, and there anchoring, slept once more aboard ship; then on the twenty-first, how they made afoot their memorable journey which particularly interests us, to the hill where Nanepashem
e exhibited a copy of the letter written by the parson calling for a fast day, to select a colleague to assist him in his latest years. Light refreshments were served and a social half-hour closed an enjoyable and interesting meeting. In response to the query, What do we celebrate in March? the Boston Massacre and the Siege and Evacuation of Boston were discussed, the members participating quite freely and with interest. The April meeting was similarly conducted, and falling on the eighteenth, very naturally the Battle of Lexington claimed attention, as well as the modern observance of Patriot's Day. Various poems and selections were read by Miss Atherton, Miss Durgin and Miss Carty, commemorating the historic rides of William Dawes and Paul Revere, and the hanging of the signal lanterns. Mr. Mann read a paper on The Route of Revere, which appears in the Register. President Ackerman called attention to the events of the winter of sixty years ago, culminating with the bomb
aks always of our doings in the expedition, I suppose that we may conclude that Winslow was of the party—of course, assuming that the future governor wrote this portion of the history. Apparently it is from the Relation, mainly, that we must get particulars of the journey: how that, setting forth in the shallop on the eighteenth, they found the way longer than they expected (being as they estimated it close to twenty leagues), so that they did not arrive within the bay until late on the nineteenth; how they landed on the twentieth on one side of the bay, where they made a treaty with Obbatinewat, after which they sailed across the bay, and there anchoring, slept once more aboard ship; then on the twenty-first, how they made afoot their memorable journey which particularly interests us, to the hill where Nanepashemit had lived, thence to the fort in the bottom lands, and a mile further on to fort on the hill where Nanepashemit was killed. As to my own reflections thereon, two or t
elation, mainly, that we must get particulars of the journey: how that, setting forth in the shallop on the eighteenth, they found the way longer than they expected (being as they estimated it close to twenty leagues), so that they did not arrive within the bay until late on the nineteenth; how they landed on the twentieth on one side of the bay, where they made a treaty with Obbatinewat, after which they sailed across the bay, and there anchoring, slept once more aboard ship; then on the twenty-first, how they made afoot their memorable journey which particularly interests us, to the hill where Nanepashemit had lived, thence to the fort in the bottom lands, and a mile further on to fort on the hill where Nanepashemit was killed. As to my own reflections thereon, two or three items stand prominently forth. How came the Pilgrims to be here at this time? Bradford says the party was sent to spy out and report upon the country of the Massachusetts, and to make a peace treaty with that
r. Wilson Fiske led off in a talk on the timely subject and was followed by several others, and the meeting was one of much interest. At the December meeting, special consideration, this being the Plymouth Day. Mr. Remele read historic selections, Miss Atherton told the story of Elder Brewster's life in England and Holland, and Mr. Mann read a short paper on the time and causes of the Pilgrim movement. This meeting was of much interest and more largely attended. The annual meeting in January was on one of the coldest evenings of the winter, and there was but a small attendance, but the reports were made, and officers elected for the ensuing year. The February meeting was An Evening with Parson Turell. Mr. Remele read selections from Brooks' History relating to him. Mr. Mann read the will of the old minister, having made copy of the same at the Probate office. At the Item—I give to little Turell Tufts. . . that my shadow may remain the portrait of Ebenezer Turell thus beque
sideration, this being the Plymouth Day. Mr. Remele read historic selections, Miss Atherton told the story of Elder Brewster's life in England and Holland, and Mr. Mann read a short paper on the time and causes of the Pilgrim movement. This meeting was of much interest and more largely attended. The annual meeting in January was on one of the coldest evenings of the winter, and there was but a small attendance, but the reports were made, and officers elected for the ensuing year. The February meeting was An Evening with Parson Turell. Mr. Remele read selections from Brooks' History relating to him. Mr. Mann read the will of the old minister, having made copy of the same at the Probate office. At the Item—I give to little Turell Tufts. . . that my shadow may remain the portrait of Ebenezer Turell thus bequeathed was displayed by Mr. Fiske, who had procured it from the First Parish Church for the occasion. At the item, I give to Simon Tufts my watch a silver watch with chain an
February 7th (search for this): chapter 19
l, but the First Methodist Episcopal is the second church in Medford, its beginning was fifteen months the earlier. To the edifice built by Galen James and his associates, Second (or First Trinitarian) Congregational, must be accorded the record of the first dedication on September 1, 1824—about three and one-half years prior to that of the Methodist structure. In the library of the New England Conference Historical Society, in Christian Advocate, February 22, 1828, we find— On Thursday, Feb. 7, the first Methodist Episcopal Church in Medford, Mass., was dedicated to the worship of God. The order of exercises commenced with select music; which was followed by the introductory prayer by the Rev. Enoch Mudge. Select scriptures were read by the Rev. Bishop Hedding—Dedicatory Poem—The dedicatory prayer was made by the Rev. Bishop. The dedicatory sermon was by the Rev. J. [ohn] N. [ewland] Maffit Two original hymns written for the occasion by the Rev. J. N. Maffit, were sung wi
February 25th (search for this): chapter 18
Consented to J. Belcher We are informed that the [original] petition of Richard Sprague is not found in the Archives, and that on July 1, 1737, Order on the recommendation of the Committee that the appeal be admitted on the usual security, and that Ellis be allowed copies of the proceeding under the Seal of the Province, on paying the usual fees. July 30, 1737. Ellis's petition for an early hearing referred to the Committee for Appeals. Aug. 14, 1737. Committee appointed Feb. 25 to hear the appeal. As on May 6, 1737, Ellis is styled as late of Medford, husbandman, it is presumable that he had then removed. Though he was taxed for real estate, we have been unable to find where in Medford he resided. We find that in 1733-34 John Whitmore, Jonathan Hall and Jona Bradshaw be Depeud [deputed?] to vew the Highways by Matthew Ellises and make Report to the Town what they Judg Mr. Ellis should have allowed him for moving Som Large Rocks in the Country Road nearby
1621—tercentenary note—1921. As this Register comes to hand a tercentenary pageant is on at Plymouth. Our Historical Society will note a Medford tercentenary in September next— that of first exploration of our territory by white men, an event of which scant notice has been taken in the past. The March of Miles Standish will be the subject of the evening. Beside the original story, several papers relative thereto will be read, and the doughty warrior will be shown at the head of his valorous army. With all the groundwork of a pageant, we must content ourselves with the above observance, but let it be an interesting o
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