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St. Raphael's is in Spanish mission style and has no bell tower, but a most unique ventilating turret centrally on its roof sustaining a tall gilded cross. Even the smallest, that of Shiloh, has its open cupola that might hold a bell. The Hillside Methodist has its tower and bell; the South Medford Baptist, however, in its building never incorporated the feature of tower, turret or steeple. Two others, at present in temporary structures, have none. So far, in our walk about our home Zion, i. e. Medford, and telling the towers therof we have dealt with those of a religious character. Counties have often incorporated this feature in their court houses, as did Middlesex at Cambridge and Lowell, even having two on the jail at the latter city. Medford never had a semblance of one on the good old town hall, though one of lofty style was proposed for the new one, nearly disrupting the town. But in the houses of the fire department it was once a useful feature. They may still be
Paul Revere (search for this): chapter 1
acquired) may not be said; but upon this lofty spire was perched a great brass rooster, beside which the present Unitarian bird is but a chicken. We were told by an eye-witness that Sam Swan, who lived next door, captured this same brass bird (which fell at his feet when the spire was pulled down in 1839), and carried it home with him. In the fifth story of this tower was placed in 1810 the first of Medford's public clocks, a gift to the town by Hon. Peter Chardon Brooks. We read in Paul Revere's Ride It was twelve by the village clock When he crossed the bridge into Medford town Doubtless the hour was right, but Mr. Longfellow was thirty-five years ahead of time, by poetic license. To be historically correct, read hereafter, by the villagers' clocks, and do no injustice to the famous poem. Before the rooster's downfall the second Medford bell was safely lowered, and with the clock had a resting time. At the completion of the new Unitarian meetinghouse (for such it was
Unitarian (search for this): chapter 1
lestown (some of whose territory had lately been acquired) may not be said; but upon this lofty spire was perched a great brass rooster, beside which the present Unitarian bird is but a chicken. We were told by an eye-witness that Sam Swan, who lived next door, captured this same brass bird (which fell at his feet when the spire whe famous poem. Before the rooster's downfall the second Medford bell was safely lowered, and with the clock had a resting time. At the completion of the new Unitarian meetinghouse (for such it was still called) both clock and bell were placed in its steeple for fifty-four years more of associated service. But by this time tn octagonal and domed, all show the skill of an architect, and set the style of the next five to be built in Medford. Next was the First Parish Meeting-house (Unitarian) 1839, a little larger on the ground; here again a colonnade of four detached columns and four pilasters. A similar treatment of the sides shows it to he classi
rd, one of private ownership, the other of municipal. The latter is the circular stone tower in the park at Hastings Heights. It stands at the crown of the ledge and is about thirty feet high. A circular iron staircase gives access to the concrete floor within its castellated battlement. From this a superb view of Medford and surrounding country may be had. It is one of the creations of Medford's park commission. A Medford engineer, Mr. E. P. Adams, designed it, and two Medford men, Messrs. Byron and Rowe, constructed it, certainly creditable to them all. But higher and more remote is the great steel tower on the so-called Ram-head hill, erected by the late General S. C. Lawrence, and commonly called the Lawrence Observatory. The top of this hill is variously stated as being two hundred and five or two hundred and twenty-nine feet above sea level. The tower itself consists of four steel fifteen-inch I beams, set diagonally at the corners and firmly secured to the ledge. At
pt forming its background. Its apex of five hundred feet was the limit of human constructive ability. Contemporary with it was Gleason's Pictorial, which carried into many homes, weekly, a view of Boston from the harbor, its crowning feature the State house dome and cupola, accentuated by the many church spires of that time. That was before the age of steel and the erection of modern office buildings; and no one thought then that the granite custom-house would grow to a height exceeding Cheops, or of a three-hundred-foot structure in Medford. The same authority (the dictionary) tells us that towers were originally built for religious or memorial purposes or for defense. But an older Book tells of the earliest tower of which we have record, in these words, And they said, Go to, let us build us a city, and a tower whose top may reach unto heaven; and let us make us a name. . . and they left off to build the city. Hard burned brick laid in bitumen is most durable constructi
Longfellow (search for this): chapter 1
chicken. We were told by an eye-witness that Sam Swan, who lived next door, captured this same brass bird (which fell at his feet when the spire was pulled down in 1839), and carried it home with him. In the fifth story of this tower was placed in 1810 the first of Medford's public clocks, a gift to the town by Hon. Peter Chardon Brooks. We read in Paul Revere's Ride It was twelve by the village clock When he crossed the bridge into Medford town Doubtless the hour was right, but Mr. Longfellow was thirty-five years ahead of time, by poetic license. To be historically correct, read hereafter, by the villagers' clocks, and do no injustice to the famous poem. Before the rooster's downfall the second Medford bell was safely lowered, and with the clock had a resting time. At the completion of the new Unitarian meetinghouse (for such it was still called) both clock and bell were placed in its steeple for fifty-four years more of associated service. But by this time the style
ivate ownership, the other of municipal. The latter is the circular stone tower in the park at Hastings Heights. It stands at the crown of the ledge and is about thirty feet high. A circular iron staircase gives access to the concrete floor within its castellated battlement. From this a superb view of Medford and surrounding country may be had. It is one of the creations of Medford's park commission. A Medford engineer, Mr. E. P. Adams, designed it, and two Medford men, Messrs. Byron and Rowe, constructed it, certainly creditable to them all. But higher and more remote is the great steel tower on the so-called Ram-head hill, erected by the late General S. C. Lawrence, and commonly called the Lawrence Observatory. The top of this hill is variously stated as being two hundred and five or two hundred and twenty-nine feet above sea level. The tower itself consists of four steel fifteen-inch I beams, set diagonally at the corners and firmly secured to the ledge. At every floor th
ctions. An idea of the size of these four columns may be had from the following, told by one of the workmen who assisted at its building: Accidentally dropping his hammer therein, he procured a rope and lowered a boy down inside, who securing it was safely hoisted out. Of the three other views mentioned, the Universalist, 1832 shows the colonnade effect in four pilasters, and an unspired steeple of two stories with diminutive turrets at the four corners, while the Methodist Meeting-house, 1844, has but a single-storied and four-gabled cupola, with larger and taller corner turrets. By 1849 we find the Mystic Church, Congregational following in the steps of its mother, with a colonnaded front of four Corinthian pilasters (still recognizable in the present edifice)and a circular window, similar but larger than that of the First Parish. Unlike either, it had no steeple of any sort, and we may put the time of its erection as about that of the decadence of steeple building, for the fas
existence and to begin that of another. That second pulpit only lacked supporting pillars under its sounding board (it being suspended by an iron rod), to make it almost a duplicate of the bell turret, the only example of which latter now remaining is that in Hingham, built in 1681. In 1669-70 was built the third meeting-house. This had the feature of a tower from the ground, whose first floor formed a vestibule, and contained a staircase leading to the gallery. Higher up, may (prior to 1812) have been stored the town's stock of powder. We are assuming this last, as such was the custom elsewhere. This tower was quite imposing in appearance, five stories in height, and stood directly against the easterly end of the meeting-house, which was of ample proportion to accommodate the growing town. It was surmounted by an open belfry. A lofty, tapering spire, which latter seems to have been an afterthought, was a visible monument to Medford's civic pride. Whether its builders had
in the person of its minister, who spelled his name Turell,—which would indicate that his ancestors were of French extraction. To him it was given to be the occupant of the second pulpit during its entire existence and to begin that of another. That second pulpit only lacked supporting pillars under its sounding board (it being suspended by an iron rod), to make it almost a duplicate of the bell turret, the only example of which latter now remaining is that in Hingham, built in 1681. In 1669-70 was built the third meeting-house. This had the feature of a tower from the ground, whose first floor formed a vestibule, and contained a staircase leading to the gallery. Higher up, may (prior to 1812) have been stored the town's stock of powder. We are assuming this last, as such was the custom elsewhere. This tower was quite imposing in appearance, five stories in height, and stood directly against the easterly end of the meeting-house, which was of ample proportion to accommodat
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