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four graceful turrets of stone at its corners give it an attractive finish, which is enhanced by the stairway tower of the chapel. At South Medford, the first and second homes of the Union Congregational embodied the same feature of the corner tower, though not in so marked a degree. Even the little chapel at Wellington was in fashion, and had a little open belfry on the corner of its roof, which in time housed the city bell. St. Clement's, in modern stucco, has its square tower of Italian look. St. Raphael's is in Spanish mission style and has no bell tower, but a most unique ventilating turret centrally on its roof sustaining a tall gilded cross. Even the smallest, that of Shiloh, has its open cupola that might hold a bell. The Hillside Methodist has its tower and bell; the South Medford Baptist, however, in its building never incorporated the feature of tower, turret or steeple. Two others, at present in temporary structures, have none. So far, in our walk about o
Emeline M. Stearns (search for this): chapter 1
paringly applied, save in one instance, that of the first Brooks School at West Medford. A description of this may be found in Vol. XIX of the Register. The tower often lends itself to the utility of a factory, but Medford had few of such. We have been told of one, the Stearns oil mill, that had a detached chimney some fifty feet high that in time was moved across the branch canal in its upright position, securely too, to a new location, certainly quite a feat to perform. The same Mr. Stearns had a windmill tower of brick, the ruin of which may still be seen beside College avenue. With its revolving sails it was an interesting sight, especially when in operation. In sight of that was another tower (once a windmill), the old powder house just over the line in Somerville. Harvard College erected on the hill beside Winthrop street in 1850 a tower, or cairn of rock, only a few years ago removed. This was for a meridian mark, and due north from the observatory at Cambridge.
cupola that might hold a bell. The Hillside Methodist has its tower and bell; the South Medford Baptist, however, in its building never incorporated the feature of tower, turret or steeple. Two others, at present in temporary structures, have none. So far, in our walk about our home Zion, i. e. Medford, and telling the towers therof we have dealt with those of a religious character. Counties have often incorporated this feature in their court houses, as did Middlesex at Cambridge and Lowell, even having two on the jail at the latter city. Medford never had a semblance of one on the good old town hall, though one of lofty style was proposed for the new one, nearly disrupting the town. But in the houses of the fire department it was once a useful feature. They may still be seen in the Central, Salem street and South Medford stations in brick, and the wooden tower at Glenwood. That at Salem street is peculiarly graceful in design. To its schoolhouses the feature of a cupola
re at the base and sixteen at the top. There are six floors of the best of wood, the uppermost eighty-one feet from the base and reached by five flights of stairs, in all one hundred and thirty-four steps. There, stands a flagstaff of thirty-five feet, and over this floor in summer an awning is spread. It is easily approached by the way of Rural avenue, and is about a mile from Winthrop square, and nearer the Winchester boundary line. It was erected by the contracting firm of Woodbury & Leighton, and its architect a Medford man, Mr. Lyman Sise. Its exact location precisely expressed is latitude 42° 26′ 18.8″ north and longitude 71° 7′ 16.2″ west. On a clear day, Monadnock is visible in the northwest, 3,170 feet high. A little north of west is Wachusett, 2,018 feet, in central Massachusetts. Blue hill, the highest point in eastern Massachusetts, 635 feet, crowned by the Rotch Observatory lies beyond the Memorial hall at Cambridge. A winter visit to this tower is interesti
Ebenezer Turell (search for this): chapter 1
th its pyramidal roof, they built thereon a little tower, i. e., a toweret or turret, and in it later was placed the first Medford bell. But it was nearly a century after its first settling that Medford acquired this visible distinction which is a feature of New England towns. Though the first meeting-house, on the great rock by Oborn rode, never had this distinguishing exterior feature, it had in its pulpit a little tower, or tourelle, in the person of its minister, who spelled his name Turell,—which would indicate that his ancestors were of French extraction. To him it was given to be the occupant of the second pulpit during its entire existence and to begin that of another. That second pulpit only lacked supporting pillars under its sounding board (it being suspended by an iron rod), to make it almost a duplicate of the bell turret, the only example of which latter now remaining is that in Hingham, built in 1681. In 1669-70 was built the third meeting-house. This had the f
Irwin O. Wright (search for this): chapter 1
ain his single dwelling house, and did even before the present inflated cost began. Turning from these to others we allude to the steel trestle of the Radio Corporation on College hill. But four feet square, it is three hundred feet high and held in position by several guys. It is to be hoped that it never may become a menace to travelers or the locality. Another tower, of little beauty, but for a time of some utility, was the water tower for high service, erected at Elm street, near Wright's pond, as auxiliary to the Medford water supply. It was a cylindrical structure of iron boiler plate, into which the water of the pond was pumped for a few years, and was approximately fifty feet high. Its use was discontinued and it was taken down when the city's supply was taken over by the Metropolitan Commission. There are two observation towers in Medford, one of private ownership, the other of municipal. The latter is the circular stone tower in the park at Hastings Heights. It
urmounted by an open belfry. A lofty, tapering spire, which latter seems to have been an afterthought, was a visible monument to Medford's civic pride. Whether its builders had disposition to crow over their neighbors of Woburn, Malden and Cambridge or over Charlestown (some of whose territory had lately been acquired) may not be said; but upon this lofty spire was perched a great brass rooster, beside which the present Unitarian bird is but a chicken. We were told by an eye-witness that Sam Swan, who lived next door, captured this same brass bird (which fell at his feet when the spire was pulled down in 1839), and carried it home with him. In the fifth story of this tower was placed in 1810 the first of Medford's public clocks, a gift to the town by Hon. Peter Chardon Brooks. We read in Paul Revere's Ride It was twelve by the village clock When he crossed the bridge into Medford town Doubtless the hour was right, but Mr. Longfellow was thirty-five years ahead of time, by po
Ellen Shepherd Brooks (search for this): chapter 1
d church, and so since 1849. As these of the various faiths were erected, there was no occasion for others until the growth of the town toward its border lines made it, and by that time the fashion had changed and the tower came into its own again. St. Mary's, on Salem street, near Malden line, whose brick tower in which is a clock paid for by Medford, was the first to build. Then Grace church, out growing its wooden chapel of 1850, acquired largely through the munificence of Mrs. Ellen Shepherd Brooks its beautiful stone church with ivy mantled tower. In ‘72 the First Methodist and the First Baptist, and in ‘73 Trinity Methodist and the Congregational (both the latter at West Medford and new organizations) erected new houses of worship—a remarkable record for two successive years. All these were of wood; all had the features of a corner tower and belfry, with spires varying from forty-eight to one hundred and forty feet in height. In three the town placed public clocks, at th<
E. P. Adams (search for this): chapter 1
sion. There are two observation towers in Medford, one of private ownership, the other of municipal. The latter is the circular stone tower in the park at Hastings Heights. It stands at the crown of the ledge and is about thirty feet high. A circular iron staircase gives access to the concrete floor within its castellated battlement. From this a superb view of Medford and surrounding country may be had. It is one of the creations of Medford's park commission. A Medford engineer, Mr. E. P. Adams, designed it, and two Medford men, Messrs. Byron and Rowe, constructed it, certainly creditable to them all. But higher and more remote is the great steel tower on the so-called Ram-head hill, erected by the late General S. C. Lawrence, and commonly called the Lawrence Observatory. The top of this hill is variously stated as being two hundred and five or two hundred and twenty-nine feet above sea level. The tower itself consists of four steel fifteen-inch I beams, set diagonally at
Samuel C. Lawrence (search for this): chapter 1
eet high. A circular iron staircase gives access to the concrete floor within its castellated battlement. From this a superb view of Medford and surrounding country may be had. It is one of the creations of Medford's park commission. A Medford engineer, Mr. E. P. Adams, designed it, and two Medford men, Messrs. Byron and Rowe, constructed it, certainly creditable to them all. But higher and more remote is the great steel tower on the so-called Ram-head hill, erected by the late General S. C. Lawrence, and commonly called the Lawrence Observatory. The top of this hill is variously stated as being two hundred and five or two hundred and twenty-nine feet above sea level. The tower itself consists of four steel fifteen-inch I beams, set diagonally at the corners and firmly secured to the ledge. At every floor these are connected by horizontal beams of steel and in every space diagonal steel ties firmly brace the structure. It is thirty-four feet square at the base and sixteen at
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