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Medford (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 19
in Medford, its beginning was fifteen months the earlier. To the edifice built by Galen James and his associates, Second (or First Trinitarian) Congregational, must be accorded the record of the first dedication on September 1, 1824—about three and one-half years prior to that of the Methodist structure. In the library of the New England Conference Historical Society, in Christian Advocate, February 22, 1828, we find— On Thursday, Feb. 7, the first Methodist Episcopal Church in Medford, Mass., was dedicated to the worship of God. The order of exercises commenced with select music; which was followed by the introductory prayer by the Rev. Enoch Mudge. Select scriptures were read by the Rev. Bishop Hedding—Dedicatory Poem—The dedicatory prayer was made by the Rev. Bishop. The dedicatory sermon was by the Rev. J. [ohn] N. [ewland] Maffit Two original hymns written for the occasion by the Rev. J. N. Maffit, were sung with great propriety and musical effect, one previous to th
New England (United States) (search for this): chapter 19
in the corner near the door, and fifty feet of necessary funnel hung under the ceiling entered a little chimney in the rear end of the roof. The seats were plain wooden benches extending from the aisle to either wall. The pulpit, very plain, with perhaps a hinged shelf in front for communion table, was on a low platform, around the sides of which was a rail, at which the communicants knelt, this last an innovation in Medford. It was one of the ten idols the standing order of theocratic New England had been combating for two centuries. Two others were church government by bishops and dedication of churches. Here was Medford invaded by three, the advance guard of the ten. Historian Brooks is careful to state that the house of the Congregationalist was dedicated to Father, Son and Holy Ghost. They seemed to thus have admitted the seventh idol, but the others they had no use for. But the historian makes no mention whatever of this old church building of 1828, and would have the
Galen James (search for this): chapter 19
are in the Register, Vol. XII, p. 2, and an occasional paper (1878) called The Half Century. Neither of these contain any account of the dedication, though the same was unique in its features and a novelty in Medford. People are wont to think of the predecessor of the Mystic Church as the Second Church of Medford. It was the Second Congregational, but the First Methodist Episcopal is the second church in Medford, its beginning was fifteen months the earlier. To the edifice built by Galen James and his associates, Second (or First Trinitarian) Congregational, must be accorded the record of the first dedication on September 1, 1824—about three and one-half years prior to that of the Methodist structure. In the library of the New England Conference Historical Society, in Christian Advocate, February 22, 1828, we find— On Thursday, Feb. 7, the first Methodist Episcopal Church in Medford, Mass., was dedicated to the worship of God. The order of exercises commenced with sele
J. N. Maffit (search for this): chapter 19
as followed by the introductory prayer by the Rev. Enoch Mudge. Select scriptures were read by the Rev. Bishop Hedding—Dedicatory Poem—The dedicatory prayer was made by the Rev. Bishop. The dedicatory sermon was by the Rev. J. [ohn] N. [ewland] Maffit Two original hymns written for the occasion by the Rev. J. N. Maffit, were sung with great propriety and musical effect, one previous to the address and the other following—Concluding prayer by the Rev. T. C. Pierce and benediction by the Rev. Mrn the new church: and after the above services had been attended in it, the Congregational church of which the Rev. Mr. Warner is pastor, in a spirit of Christian fellowship politely offered the accommodation of their meetinghouse in which the Rev. Mr. Maffit delivered the sermon that had been prepared as the dedication sermon. The text was in Haggai 11, 7. And I will fill this house with glory, saith the Lord of hosts. The services were solemn, appropriate and affecting. Union of feeling an<
Bishop Hedding (search for this): chapter 19
on September 1, 1824—about three and one-half years prior to that of the Methodist structure. In the library of the New England Conference Historical Society, in Christian Advocate, February 22, 1828, we find— On Thursday, Feb. 7, the first Methodist Episcopal Church in Medford, Mass., was dedicated to the worship of God. The order of exercises commenced with select music; which was followed by the introductory prayer by the Rev. Enoch Mudge. Select scriptures were read by the Rev. Bishop Hedding—Dedicatory Poem—The dedicatory prayer was made by the Rev. Bishop. The dedicatory sermon was by the Rev. J. [ohn] N. [ewland] Maffit Two original hymns written for the occasion by the Rev. J. N. Maffit, were sung with great propriety and musical effect, one previous to the address and the other following—Concluding prayer by the Rev. T. C. Pierce and benediction by the Rev. Mr. Bracket. The concourse of people was too great to find accommodation in the new church: and after t
Samuel Brooks (search for this): chapter 19
Local history in a barber's shop. In hell there are no barber's shops. Such is a remark attributed by historian Brooks to the Medford minister of a century ago. We fancy the assertion to be the result of a course of reasoning as to human depravity, rather than of any personal search, by Doctor Osgood. Per contra, it would be of interest had the good doctor made note of the number of such shops then in Medford. As the town's minister for fifty years, he had been something of an autocrat, and was not particularly noted for soft speeches. We wonder a little what would have happened had he been in his prime when Rev. Josiah Bracket came up from Charlestown to preach to some people, not of the standing order, in a building called the college. Considering his sermon against the Malden Baptists, we fear it would have been Let him be anathema, and the house that they shall build come to naught. Meeting in various places for over five years, those people succeeded, in 1828, in erecti
John Newland Maffit (search for this): chapter 19
. Select scriptures were read by the Rev. Bishop Hedding—Dedicatory Poem—The dedicatory prayer was made by the Rev. Bishop. The dedicatory sermon was by the Rev. J. [ohn] N. [ewland] Maffit Two original hymns written for the occasion by the Rev. J. N. Maffit, were sung with great propriety and musical effect, one previous to the address and the other following—Concluding prayer by the Rev. T. C. Pierce and benediction by the Rev. Mr. Bracket. The concourse of people was too great to find aemple walls were done, Oh, raise to heaven a glorious song. It certainly was an event worth recording, though a day of small things in the beginning of Medford Methodism, but the fine courtesy of that long-ago day is pleasant to read. John Newland Maffit was the Boston minister, and a wonderful pulpit orator and poet of no mean ability. Enoch Mudge was also a prominent preacher, and T. C. Pierce was presiding elder. But what a contrast there must have been in the appearance of the two <
Frederick Brooks (search for this): chapter 19
isle to either wall. The pulpit, very plain, with perhaps a hinged shelf in front for communion table, was on a low platform, around the sides of which was a rail, at which the communicants knelt, this last an innovation in Medford. It was one of the ten idols the standing order of theocratic New England had been combating for two centuries. Two others were church government by bishops and dedication of churches. Here was Medford invaded by three, the advance guard of the ten. Historian Brooks is careful to state that the house of the Congregationalist was dedicated to Father, Son and Holy Ghost. They seemed to thus have admitted the seventh idol, but the others they had no use for. But the historian makes no mention whatever of this old church building of 1828, and would have the reader think there was no Methodist church in Medford until 1843. Just how long this building was used we cannot say, nor yet with certainty when it was moved to its present site, but let us see wha
John Bishop (search for this): chapter 19
the Methodist structure. In the library of the New England Conference Historical Society, in Christian Advocate, February 22, 1828, we find— On Thursday, Feb. 7, the first Methodist Episcopal Church in Medford, Mass., was dedicated to the worship of God. The order of exercises commenced with select music; which was followed by the introductory prayer by the Rev. Enoch Mudge. Select scriptures were read by the Rev. Bishop Hedding—Dedicatory Poem—The dedicatory prayer was made by the Rev. Bishop. The dedicatory sermon was by the Rev. J. [ohn] N. [ewland] Maffit Two original hymns written for the occasion by the Rev. J. N. Maffit, were sung with great propriety and musical effect, one previous to the address and the other following—Concluding prayer by the Rev. T. C. Pierce and benediction by the Rev. Mr. Bracket. The concourse of people was too great to find accommodation in the new church: and after the above services had been attended in it, the Congregational church of
Daniel Osgood (search for this): chapter 19
Local history in a barber's shop. In hell there are no barber's shops. Such is a remark attributed by historian Brooks to the Medford minister of a century ago. We fancy the assertion to be the result of a course of reasoning as to human depravity, rather than of any personal search, by Doctor Osgood. Per contra, it would be of interest had the good doctor made note of the number of such shops then in Medford. As the town's minister for fifty years, he had been something of an autocrat, and was not particularly noted for soft speeches. We wonder a little what would have happened had he been in his prime when Rev. Josiah Bracket came up from Charlestown to preach to some people, not of the standing order, in a building called the college. Considering his sermon against the Malden Baptists, we fear it would have been Let him be anathema, and the house that they shall build come to naught. Meeting in various places for over five years, those people succeeded, in 1828, in erect
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