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Ashley River (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
s' bought it from an old family of the name of Short about the beginning of Charles II reign. Yesterday I went to the William Salt Library to hunt up the Shorts, and after a terrible long hunt we found that a family of the name of Short lived at Ashley, also a Cradock lived there in the Commonwealth. Thomas Short of Ashley had a son Edward, who married Miss Cradock, dau. Of———Cradock of Hungersheath. [Hungersheath is a bit of waste land adjacent to Ashley. I think the name has died out of pAshley had a son Edward, who married Miss Cradock, dau. Of———Cradock of Hungersheath. [Hungersheath is a bit of waste land adjacent to Ashley. I think the name has died out of present day maps.] They had a son Edward Short of Mayford in 1663. This I think proves the connection between the Shorts of Meaford and the Cradocks. We must have bought Mayford from this Edward Short soon after 1663. There are Short monuments at Lichfield. Yours Sincerely, E. M. Parker Jervis. Evidently there is yet much to learn about the father of our Medford, but it would appear from the third (Jervis) letter that the difficulties referred to by Historian Hughes are, in a me
Providence, R. I. (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
after 1663. There are Short monuments at Lichfield. Yours Sincerely, E. M. Parker Jervis. Evidently there is yet much to learn about the father of our Medford, but it would appear from the third (Jervis) letter that the difficulties referred to by Historian Hughes are, in a measure, cleared up. What may yet be learned we leave to future issues of the Register, and present the following:— Copy of inscription at Caverswall Church George Cradock Esqre (for his great Providence in the Common laws well worthy named Beau Clarke of ye Assizes for this Circuit) did take to wife ye most amiable & most loving Dorothy ye daughter of John Saunders Doctor of Physicke by whom he had a Pair Royal of incomparable Daughters—to wit Dorothy, Elizabeth and Mary It is easier to guesse that he lived in a splendid Degree if I shall but recount to you that Sir Thos. Slingsly Bt.marriedDorothy The Rt. Hon. Robt Lord CholmondelyElizabeth Sir John BridgemanMary But! but!
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
ear Stone which you thought was the origin of your town name of Medford. Mr. Davis, the chairman, handed on your letter to me. I have made extensive inquiries about the Matthew Craddock who (your brochure says) founded the Colony of Medford in 1628. There were two Matthew Craddocks living at the same time, Members of Parliament. They were first cousins; one was Member of Parliament for Stafford, the other for London. It was the London M. P. who undoubtedly founded the colony in Massachusetts. There is so far no difficulty. But the real difficulty is that no possible connection can be traced between the Craddocks and the seat of Meaford at the time the colony was founded, nor indeed until a hundred years later. I have not seen the birth of this Matthew Craddock (he died in 1641, just before the beginning of the Civil War) but if he called his colony on the Mistick River Metford I do not think he could have called it after his country seat in Staffordshire for the simple re
Meaford (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 13
5, 1920) a letter to the Mayor of Meaford, Staffordshire, England, and somewhat later another to Str) asking for information about the hamlet of Meaford near Stone which you thought was the origin o traced between the Craddocks and the seat of Meaford at the time the colony was founded, nor indeecannot be proved to have been associated with Meaford at all. Perhaps they were, but most StaffordsCraddock was a friend of the man who lived at Meaford—he himself lived at Caverswall about ten mileI enclose you letters from the proprietors at Meaford now, the lineal descendants of Matthew Craddock. The connection with Meaford before 1735 can not be proved. Perhaps you could give me some m due to them and to the present proprietor of Meaford (whose letters to Historian Hughes follow), wfriends. I cannot find any connection with Meaford nearer than this. Will you please tell me whampler worked by Mary Cradock (now framed at Meaford) [Alphabet is here worked twice in capita[1 more...]<
Stone River (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
that something more might be learned, the editor addressed (December 25, 1920) a letter to the Mayor of Meaford, Staffordshire, England, and somewhat later another to Staffordshire County Council. Reply to the latter appeared in Vol. XXIV, p. 71. Accompanying the letter of the Council's clerk were the three excellent views shown in our present illustration. Soon after its publication we received a reply to our earlier letter, which we present for careful reading:— 20 Kings avenue, Stone, Staffordshire. Feb. 26, 1922. Dear Mr. Mann, On Christmas Day, 1920, you wrote to the chairman of the Urban District Council of Stone (there is no mayor as the town has never received a charter) asking for information about the hamlet of Meaford near Stone which you thought was the origin of your town name of Medford. Mr. Davis, the chairman, handed on your letter to me. I have made extensive inquiries about the Matthew Craddock who (your brochure says) founded the Colony of Medfor
Staffordshire (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 13
Mayor of Meaford, Staffordshire, England, and somewhat later another to Staffordshire County Council. Reply to the latter appeared in Vol. XXIV, p. 71. Accompanyinter, which we present for careful reading:— 20 Kings avenue, Stone, Staffordshire. Feb. 26, 1922. Dear Mr. Mann, On Christmas Day, 1920, you wrote to the er Metford I do not think he could have called it after his country seat in Staffordshire for the simple reason that the Craddocks there cannot be proved to have been associated with Meaford at all. Perhaps they were, but most Staffordshire historians think not. Perhaps Matthew Craddock was a friend of the man who lived at Meafory kind regards, Ever yours, mark Hughes, B. A. (Author of the Story of Staffordshire Tales and Legends of the Midland Counties, etc.) It thus appears that our inquiries have created interest among Staffordshire historians, and their search reveals the fact of there being two (contemporary) Matthew Cradocks, both Members
Park Hall (Maryland, United States) (search for this): chapter 13
not the Jervis'. I find that on Nov. 28th, 1735, John Hawe of Walsall married Mary Cradock. They had a daughter Mary who married in 1764, Thomas Hawe Parker of Park Hall. This Thomas Parker left his Park Hall estate to his nephew, my grandfather the Honble E. S. Parker Jervis, and it now belongs to my brother. We also still ownPark Hall estate to his nephew, my grandfather the Honble E. S. Parker Jervis, and it now belongs to my brother. We also still own the old property of the Hawes Solihull near Warwick. I have found a curious old sampler worked by this Mary Cradock in 1722, and we have a beautiful portrait of their daughter Mary, painted by one Saunders. I also find in Erdeswick that Matthew Cradock purchased Carswall or Caverswall Castle from Lord Huntingdon some time previous to 1655, so I think it probable that the Cradocks at Caverswall and the Parkers at Park Hall were near neighbors and friends. I cannot find any connection with Meaford nearer than this. Will you please tell me what you found at the Willm Salt library and if your information at all tallies with mine, and in the meantime I wil
Lichfield (United Kingdom) (search for this): chapter 13
also a Cradock lived there in the Commonwealth. Thomas Short of Ashley had a son Edward, who married Miss Cradock, dau. Of———Cradock of Hungersheath. [Hungersheath is a bit of waste land adjacent to Ashley. I think the name has died out of present day maps.] They had a son Edward Short of Mayford in 1663. This I think proves the connection between the Shorts of Meaford and the Cradocks. We must have bought Mayford from this Edward Short soon after 1663. There are Short monuments at Lichfield. Yours Sincerely, E. M. Parker Jervis. Evidently there is yet much to learn about the father of our Medford, but it would appear from the third (Jervis) letter that the difficulties referred to by Historian Hughes are, in a measure, cleared up. What may yet be learned we leave to future issues of the Register, and present the following:— Copy of inscription at Caverswall Church George Cradock Esqre (for his great Providence in the Common laws well worthy named Bea
Thomas Hawe Parker (search for this): chapter 13
are certainly due to them and to the present proprietor of Meaford (whose letters to Historian Hughes follow), who carefully copied the inscription in Caverswall church. Feb. 10th. Dear Mr. Hughes— Since I saw you the other night I have been hunting up the Cradocks. I find as I thought that they are related to us through the Parkers. . not the Jervis'. I find that on Nov. 28th, 1735, John Hawe of Walsall married Mary Cradock. They had a daughter Mary who married in 1764, Thomas Hawe Parker of Park Hall. This Thomas Parker left his Park Hall estate to his nephew, my grandfather the Honble E. S. Parker Jervis, and it now belongs to my brother. We also still own the old property of the Hawes Solihull near Warwick. I have found a curious old sampler worked by this Mary Cradock in 1722, and we have a beautiful portrait of their daughter Mary, painted by one Saunders. I also find in Erdeswick that Matthew Cradock purchased Carswall or Caverswall Castle from Lord Huntingdon
Mark Hughes (search for this): chapter 13
more information on that subject. With very kind regards, Ever yours, mark Hughes, B. A. (Author of the Story of Staffordshire Tales and Legends of the Midlanue to them and to the present proprietor of Meaford (whose letters to Historian Hughes follow), who carefully copied the inscription in Caverswall church. Feb. 10th. Dear Mr. Hughes— Since I saw you the other night I have been hunting up the Cradocks. I find as I thought that they are related to us through the Parkerss all so very interesting. Yours sincerely, E. M. Parker Jervis. Dear Mr. Hughes— I send you today a Copy of an inscription on a Cradock tomb at Caverswallears later is also painted by a Saunders, which is curious. Feb. 9th. Dear Mr. Hughes. I believe I may have solved the difficulty about Medford. I had an idea r from the third (Jervis) letter that the difficulties referred to by Historian Hughes are, in a measure, cleared up. What may yet be learned we leave to future is
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