hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Concord (Massachusetts, United States) 36 0 Browse Search
Isaac Hall 31 1 Browse Search
Paul Revere 28 0 Browse Search
1870 AD 25 25 Browse Search
San Francisco (California, United States) 24 0 Browse Search
Massachusetts (Massachusetts, United States) 24 0 Browse Search
Thomas P. Smith 20 0 Browse Search
Salem (Massachusetts, United States) 18 0 Browse Search
Gorham Brooks 16 0 Browse Search
Matthew Cradock 16 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 28.. Search the whole document.

Found 20 total hits in 17 results.

1 2
Northfield, Mass. (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 22
Season of 1924-25. October 20. Unseasonably cold, but nine present to give their vacation experiences. President Ackerman told his, in which he felled an oak tree (just over Medford line in Somerville), where thirty-two two-apartment houses have been built. The tree was one hundred and ninety years old. Mr. Mann told of his at the Holton family reunion at Northfield, where he read the historical address on August 28, quoting a little therefrom. Several others alluded to theirs and a pleasant evening (indoors) was passed. November 17. Sudden winter conditions, and but five came to our rooms. Rev. Arthur Ackerman was to have spoken but it was thought best to await a better time. December 15. A cold day and evening. Misfortune of fire in barrel of kindling wood—some damage by smoke. But four ventured out to the meeting. January 19, 1925. Annual meeting. Various reports made and officers chosen. January 26. Seven directors held meeting at Mr. Colby's and appoin
onsideration of the coming Patriot's Day. April 20. No meeting was held nor house kept open at this time, owing to the lack of suitable attendants and care. May 18. Owing to illness of the President, who was to make provision, no meeting was held. The issues of the Register speak for the publication department. During the year the usual regular accessions have come to the library and quite a number of interesting articles to our collection, including the piano of the late Miss Ellen M. Lane. The Society has been represented at most of the quarterly gatherings of the Bay State Historical League, which is awaiting an invitation to meet with us and which we are yet unable to extend. The damage occasioned by the slight fire was covered by insurance, but that respectively done to the exterior and to the windows has caused us much expense, and from this we have no protection or redress. One visitor had his automobile stolen and another was assaulted on a Patriot's Day by
Moses Whitcher Mann (search for this): chapter 22
esent to give their vacation experiences. President Ackerman told his, in which he felled an oak tree (just over Medford line in Somerville), where thirty-two two-apartment houses have been built. The tree was one hundred and ninety years old. Mr. Mann told of his at the Holton family reunion at Northfield, where he read the historical address on August 28, quoting a little therefrom. Several others alluded to theirs and a pleasant evening (indoors) was passed. November 17. Sudden winter wood—some damage by smoke. But four ventured out to the meeting. January 19, 1925. Annual meeting. Various reports made and officers chosen. January 26. Seven directors held meeting at Mr. Colby's and appointed committees. March 16. Mr. Mann spoke of the old British flag, exhibiting the one captured at Lexington. The evening was taken up with consideration of the coming Patriot's Day. April 20. No meeting was held nor house kept open at this time, owing to the lack of suitable
o theirs and a pleasant evening (indoors) was passed. November 17. Sudden winter conditions, and but five came to our rooms. Rev. Arthur Ackerman was to have spoken but it was thought best to await a better time. December 15. A cold day and evening. Misfortune of fire in barrel of kindling wood—some damage by smoke. But four ventured out to the meeting. January 19, 1925. Annual meeting. Various reports made and officers chosen. January 26. Seven directors held meeting at Mr. Colby's and appointed committees. March 16. Mr. Mann spoke of the old British flag, exhibiting the one captured at Lexington. The evening was taken up with consideration of the coming Patriot's Day. April 20. No meeting was held nor house kept open at this time, owing to the lack of suitable attendants and care. May 18. Owing to illness of the President, who was to make provision, no meeting was held. The issues of the Register speak for the publication department. During the y
Arthur Ackerman (search for this): chapter 22
erman told his, in which he felled an oak tree (just over Medford line in Somerville), where thirty-two two-apartment houses have been built. The tree was one hundred and ninety years old. Mr. Mann told of his at the Holton family reunion at Northfield, where he read the historical address on August 28, quoting a little therefrom. Several others alluded to theirs and a pleasant evening (indoors) was passed. November 17. Sudden winter conditions, and but five came to our rooms. Rev. Arthur Ackerman was to have spoken but it was thought best to await a better time. December 15. A cold day and evening. Misfortune of fire in barrel of kindling wood—some damage by smoke. But four ventured out to the meeting. January 19, 1925. Annual meeting. Various reports made and officers chosen. January 26. Seven directors held meeting at Mr. Colby's and appointed committees. March 16. Mr. Mann spoke of the old British flag, exhibiting the one captured at Lexington. The evening
Herbert Newton Ackerman (search for this): chapter 22
Season of 1924-25. October 20. Unseasonably cold, but nine present to give their vacation experiences. President Ackerman told his, in which he felled an oak tree (just over Medford line in Somerville), where thirty-two two-apartment houses have been built. The tree was one hundred and ninety years old. Mr. Mann told of his at the Holton family reunion at Northfield, where he read the historical address on August 28, quoting a little therefrom. Several others alluded to theirs and a pleasant evening (indoors) was passed. November 17. Sudden winter conditions, and but five came to our rooms. Rev. Arthur Ackerman was to have spoken but it was thought best to await a better time. December 15. A cold day and evening. Misfortune of fire in barrel of kindling wood—some damage by smoke. But four ventured out to the meeting. January 19, 1925. Annual meeting. Various reports made and officers chosen. January 26. Seven directors held meeting at Mr. Colby's and appoin
January 19th, 1925 AD (search for this): chapter 22
n at Northfield, where he read the historical address on August 28, quoting a little therefrom. Several others alluded to theirs and a pleasant evening (indoors) was passed. November 17. Sudden winter conditions, and but five came to our rooms. Rev. Arthur Ackerman was to have spoken but it was thought best to await a better time. December 15. A cold day and evening. Misfortune of fire in barrel of kindling wood—some damage by smoke. But four ventured out to the meeting. January 19, 1925. Annual meeting. Various reports made and officers chosen. January 26. Seven directors held meeting at Mr. Colby's and appointed committees. March 16. Mr. Mann spoke of the old British flag, exhibiting the one captured at Lexington. The evening was taken up with consideration of the coming Patriot's Day. April 20. No meeting was held nor house kept open at this time, owing to the lack of suitable attendants and care. May 18. Owing to illness of the President, who was to
October 20th (search for this): chapter 22
Season of 1924-25. October 20. Unseasonably cold, but nine present to give their vacation experiences. President Ackerman told his, in which he felled an oak tree (just over Medford line in Somerville), where thirty-two two-apartment houses have been built. The tree was one hundred and ninety years old. Mr. Mann told of his at the Holton family reunion at Northfield, where he read the historical address on August 28, quoting a little therefrom. Several others alluded to theirs and a pleasant evening (indoors) was passed. November 17. Sudden winter conditions, and but five came to our rooms. Rev. Arthur Ackerman was to have spoken but it was thought best to await a better time. December 15. A cold day and evening. Misfortune of fire in barrel of kindling wood—some damage by smoke. But four ventured out to the meeting. January 19, 1925. Annual meeting. Various reports made and officers chosen. January 26. Seven directors held meeting at Mr. Colby's and appoin
November 17th (search for this): chapter 22
bly cold, but nine present to give their vacation experiences. President Ackerman told his, in which he felled an oak tree (just over Medford line in Somerville), where thirty-two two-apartment houses have been built. The tree was one hundred and ninety years old. Mr. Mann told of his at the Holton family reunion at Northfield, where he read the historical address on August 28, quoting a little therefrom. Several others alluded to theirs and a pleasant evening (indoors) was passed. November 17. Sudden winter conditions, and but five came to our rooms. Rev. Arthur Ackerman was to have spoken but it was thought best to await a better time. December 15. A cold day and evening. Misfortune of fire in barrel of kindling wood—some damage by smoke. But four ventured out to the meeting. January 19, 1925. Annual meeting. Various reports made and officers chosen. January 26. Seven directors held meeting at Mr. Colby's and appointed committees. March 16. Mr. Mann spoke o
Season of 1924-25. October 20. Unseasonably cold, but nine present to give their vacation experiences. President Ackerman told his, in which he felled an oak tree (just over Medford line in Somerville), where thirty-two two-apartment houses have been built. The tree was one hundred and ninety years old. Mr. Mann told of his at the Holton family reunion at Northfield, where he read the historical address on August 28, quoting a little therefrom. Several others alluded to theirs and a pleasant evening (indoors) was passed. November 17. Sudden winter conditions, and but five came to our rooms. Rev. Arthur Ackerman was to have spoken but it was thought best to await a better time. December 15. A cold day and evening. Misfortune of fire in barrel of kindling wood—some damage by smoke. But four ventured out to the meeting. January 19, 1925. Annual meeting. Various reports made and officers chosen. January 26. Seven directors held meeting at Mr. Colby's and appoin
1 2