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Middlesex Village (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): chapter 3
or the President's old Arm-Chair. A poem with this caption was written by Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes many years ago. A recent reading suggested search in the Probate records for the old parson's will, and led to an interesting evening with Parson Turell at the Historical Society, when the poem we reproduce was read. As no such bequest appeared in the will, we were led to inquire how much was fact or how much poetic license or fictional embellishment. We appealed to the sheriff of Middlesex, who is annually on duty at commencement. He could not inform us, but gave an interesting account of his participation, and how he was reminded by the president that he should omit saying Please, and say authoritatively, This assembly will now come to order. Emphasizing this command with a thump of his sword he found its point had stuck into the floor quite firmly. In the library of the Massachusetts Historical Society we found the poem and a woodcut of the President's Chair. After
e, Who gave him crowns of silver three, Lee conveyed it unto drew, And now the payment, of course, was two. Drew gave up the chair to Dunn,— All he got, as you see was one. Dunn released the chair to Hall, And got by the bargain no crown at all. And now it passed to a second Brown, Who took it and likewise claimed a crown. When Brown conveyed it unto Ware, Having had one crown, to make it fair, He paid him two crowns to take the chair; And Ware, being honest, (as all Wares be,) He paid one Potter, who took it, three. Four got Robinson; five got Dix; Johnson primus demanded six; And so the sum kept gathering still Till after the battle of Bunker's Hill. When paper money became so cheap, Folks wouldn't count it, but said ‘a heap,’ A certain Richards, the books declare,— (A. M. in ‘90? I've looked with care Through the Triennial,—name not there,) This person Richards was offered then Eight score pounds, but would have ten; Nine, I think, was the sum he took,— Not quite certain
Oliver Wendell Holmes (search for this): chapter 3
Parson Turell's Legacy or the President's old Arm-Chair. A poem with this caption was written by Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes many years ago. A recent reading suggested search in the Probate records for the old parson's will, and led to an interesting evening with Parson Turell at the Historical Society, when the poem we reproduce was read. As no such bequest appeared in the will, we were led to inquire how much was fact or how much poetic license or fictional embellishment. We appeal were asked, Have you found the Turell chair yet? We replied cautiously, We saw the president's chair at Harvard College on September 16, 1924, but really don't know that it was Parson Turell's. It doesn't look like the woodcut we saw. Perhaps Dr. Holmes' poem is much embellishment and little history. M. W. M. Parson Turell's Legacy or the President's old Arm-Chair Facts respecting an old arm-chair, At Cambridge. Is kept in the College there, Seems but little the worse for wear. That'
, Lee conveyed it unto drew, And now the payment, of course, was two. Drew gave up the chair to Dunn,— All he got, as you see was one. Dunn released the chair to Hall, And got by the bargain no crown at all. And now it passed to a second Brown, Who took it and likewise claimed a crown. When Brown conveyed it unto Ware, Having had one crown, to make it fair, He paid him two crowns to take the chair; And Ware, being honest, (as all Wares be,) He paid one Potter, who took it, three. Four got Robinson; five got Dix; Johnson primus demanded six; And so the sum kept gathering still Till after the battle of Bunker's Hill. When paper money became so cheap, Folks wouldn't count it, but said ‘a heap,’ A certain Richards, the books declare,— (A. M. in ‘90? I've looked with care Through the Triennial,—name not there,) This person Richards was offered then Eight score pounds, but would have ten; Nine, I think, was the sum he took,— Not quite certain,—but see the book. By and by the w
than he gave to claime, That being his Debte for use of same.” Smith transferred it to one of the Browns, And took his money,—five silver crowns, Brown delivered up to Moore, Who paid, it is plain, not five, but four. Moore made over the chair to Lee, Who gave him crowns of silver three, Lee conveyed it unto drew, And now the payment, of course, was two. Drew gave up the chair to Dunn,— All he got, as you see was one. Dunn released the chair to Hall, And got by the bargain no crown at all. AnLee conveyed it unto drew, And now the payment, of course, was two. Drew gave up the chair to Dunn,— All he got, as you see was one. Dunn released the chair to Hall, And got by the bargain no crown at all. And now it passed to a second Brown, Who took it and likewise claimed a crown. When Brown conveyed it unto Ware, Having had one crown, to make it fair, He paid him two crowns to take the chair; And Ware, being honest, (as all Wares be,) He paid one Potter, who took it, three. Four got Robinson; five got Dix; Johnson primus demanded six; And so the sum kept gathering still Till after the battle of Bunker's Hill. When paper money became so cheap, Folks wouldn't count it, but said ‘a heap,’
unto drew, And now the payment, of course, was two. Drew gave up the chair to Dunn,— All he got, as you see was one. Dunn released the chair to Hall, And got by the bargain no crown at all. And now it passed to a second Brown, Who took it and likewise claimed a crown. When Brown conveyed it unto Ware, Having had one crown, to make it fair, He paid him two crowns to take the chair; And Ware, being honest, (as all Wares be,) He paid one Potter, who took it, three. Four got Robinson; five got Dix; Johnson primus demanded six; And so the sum kept gathering still Till after the battle of Bunker's Hill. When paper money became so cheap, Folks wouldn't count it, but said ‘a heap,’ A certain Richards, the books declare,— (A. M. in ‘90? I've looked with care Through the Triennial,—name not there,) This person Richards was offered then Eight score pounds, but would have ten; Nine, I think, was the sum he took,— Not quite certain,—but see the book. By and by the wars were still,
Abigail Brown (search for this): chapter 3
one Crown lesse than he gave to claime, That being his Debte for use of same.” Smith transferred it to one of the Browns, And took his money,—five silver crowns, Brown delivered up to Moore, Who paid, it is plain, not five, but four. Moore made over the chair to Lee, Who gave him crowns of silver three, Lee conveyed it unto drew,gave up the chair to Dunn,— All he got, as you see was one. Dunn released the chair to Hall, And got by the bargain no crown at all. And now it passed to a second Brown, Who took it and likewise claimed a crown. When Brown conveyed it unto Ware, Having had one crown, to make it fair, He paid him two crowns to take the chair; And Brown conveyed it unto Ware, Having had one crown, to make it fair, He paid him two crowns to take the chair; And Ware, being honest, (as all Wares be,) He paid one Potter, who took it, three. Four got Robinson; five got Dix; Johnson primus demanded six; And so the sum kept gathering still Till after the battle of Bunker's Hill. When paper money became so cheap, Folks wouldn't count it, but said ‘a heap,’ A certain Richards, the books dec
Parson Turell's Legacy or the President's old Arm-Chair. A poem with this caption was written by Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes many years ago. A recent reading secords for the old parson's will, and led to an interesting evening with Parson Turell at the Historical Society, when the poem we reproduce was read. As no such bHarvard College on September 16, 1924, but really don't know that it was Parson Turell's. It doesn't look like the woodcut we saw. Perhaps Dr. Holmes' poem is much embellishment and little history. M. W. M. Parson Turell's Legacy or the President's old Arm-Chair Facts respecting an old arm-chair, At Cambridge. Is kept inr there:— I'm talking about an old arm-chair. You've heard, no doubt, of Parson Turell? Over at Medford he used to dwell; Married one of the Mather's folk; Got with hf Justice Sewall a cause to try in, Or Cotton Mather to sit—and lie—in. Parson Turell bequeathed the same To a certain student,—Smith by name; These were the terms,
. Drew gave up the chair to Dunn,— All he got, as you see was one. Dunn released the chair to Hall, And got by the bargain no crown at all. And now it passed to a second Brown, Who took it and likewise claimed a crown. When Brown conveyed it unto Ware, Having had one crown, to make it fair, He paid him two crowns to take the chair; And Ware, being honest, (as all Wares be,) He paid one Potter, who took it, three. Four got Robinson; five got Dix; Johnson primus demanded six; And so the sum keptWare, being honest, (as all Wares be,) He paid one Potter, who took it, three. Four got Robinson; five got Dix; Johnson primus demanded six; And so the sum kept gathering still Till after the battle of Bunker's Hill. When paper money became so cheap, Folks wouldn't count it, but said ‘a heap,’ A certain Richards, the books declare,— (A. M. in ‘90? I've looked with care Through the Triennial,—name not there,) This person Richards was offered then Eight score pounds, but would have ten; Nine, I think, was the sum he took,— Not quite certain,—but see the book. By and by the wars were still, But nothing had altered the Parson's will. The old a
But this is neither here nor there:— I'm talking about an old arm-chair. You've heard, no doubt, of Parson Turell? Over at Medford he used to dwell; Married one of the Mather's folk; Got with his wife a chair of oak,— Funny old chair with seat like a wedge, Sharp behind with broad front edge, One of the oddest of human things, Turned all over with knobs and rings, But heavy, and wide, and deep, and grand,— Fit for the worthies of the land,— Chief Justice Sewall a cause to try in, Or Cotton Mather to sit—and lie—in. Parson Turell bequeathed the same To a certain student,—Smith by name; These were the terms, as we are told; “Said Smith said Chaire to have and holde; When he doth graduate, then to passe To ye oldest Youth in ye Senior Classe, On payment of (naming a certain sum)— By him to whom ye Chaire shall come; He to ye oldest Senior next; And so forever—(thus runs the text,) But one Crown lesse than he gave to claime, That being his Debte for use of same.” Smith t
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