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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: November 7, 1860., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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The Emperor Napoleon and the American Minister. --The Paris correspondent of the New York Times writes that the American Minister to Paris (Mr. Faulkner) was recently summoned to the palace of St. Cloud to deliver into the hands of His Majesty the letter of recall of the Count de Sartiges as Minister at Washington. This ceremony, where Ministers only are concerned, is usually performed with the Minister of Foreign Affairs; but the Emperor desired, no doubt, to show a special attention on this occasion to the agent of the United States. In this interview Mr. Faulkner was retained a long time in friendly conversation with his Majesty, in which the latter displayed that wonderful general knowledge of affairs all over the world for which he is remarkable, and recalled in all its details, with many expressions of delight, his visit to the United States. He spoke of his astonishment at the wonderful activity of New York after arriving from sluggish Europe. He referred at length to
The Emperor Napoleon and the American Minister. --The Paris correspondent of the New York Times writes that the American Minister to Paris (Mr. Faulkner) was recently summoned to the palace of St. Cloud to deliver into the hands of His Majesty the letter of recall of the Count de Sartiges as Minister at Washington. This ceremony, where Ministers only are concerned, is usually performed with the Minister of Foreign Affairs; but the Emperor desired, no doubt, to show a special attention on this occasion to the agent of the United States. In this interview Mr. Faulkner was retained a long time in friendly conversation with his Majesty, in which the latter displayed that wonderful general knowledge of affairs all over the world for which he is remarkable, and recalled in all its details, with many expressions of delight, his visit to the United States. He spoke of his astonishment at the wonderful activity of New York after arriving from sluggish Europe. He referred at length to
France (France) (search for this): article 7
riendly conversation with his Majesty, in which the latter displayed that wonderful general knowledge of affairs all over the world for which he is remarkable, and recalled in all its details, with many expressions of delight, his visit to the United States. He spoke of his astonishment at the wonderful activity of New York after arriving from sluggish Europe. He referred at length to the war fears of England, and denounced those fears as the greatest absurdity. He had not now and never had a thought of provoking a war with England.--His pride and ambition was to elevate France to a high position of commercial and agricultural prosperity, and he could best accomplish this by remaining the friend and ally of England. To suppose that he would go to war with England for revenge was a small compliment to his statesmanship. The Emperor was warm in his expressions of friendship to the people of the United States, and promised his good will in the conclusion of a new commercial treaty.
St. Cloud (Minnesota, United States) (search for this): article 7
The Emperor Napoleon and the American Minister. --The Paris correspondent of the New York Times writes that the American Minister to Paris (Mr. Faulkner) was recently summoned to the palace of St. Cloud to deliver into the hands of His Majesty the letter of recall of the Count de Sartiges as Minister at Washington. This ceremony, where Ministers only are concerned, is usually performed with the Minister of Foreign Affairs; but the Emperor desired, no doubt, to show a special attention on this occasion to the agent of the United States. In this interview Mr. Faulkner was retained a long time in friendly conversation with his Majesty, in which the latter displayed that wonderful general knowledge of affairs all over the world for which he is remarkable, and recalled in all its details, with many expressions of delight, his visit to the United States. He spoke of his astonishment at the wonderful activity of New York after arriving from sluggish Europe. He referred at length to
Department de Ville de Paris (France) (search for this): article 7
The Emperor Napoleon and the American Minister. --The Paris correspondent of the New York Times writes that the American Minister to Paris (Mr. Faulkner) was recently summoned to the palace of St. Cloud to deliver into the hands of His Majesty the letter of recall of the Count de Sartiges as Minister at Washington. This ceremony, where Ministers only are concerned, is usually performed with the Minister of Foreign Affairs; but the Emperor desired, no doubt, to show a special attention on this occasion to the agent of the United States. In this interview Mr. Faulkner was retained a long time in friendly conversation with his Majesty, in which the latter displayed that wonderful general knowledge of affairs all over the world for which he is remarkable, and recalled in all its details, with many expressions of delight, his visit to the United States. He spoke of his astonishment at the wonderful activity of New York after arriving from sluggish Europe. He referred at length to
United States (United States) (search for this): article 7
is usually performed with the Minister of Foreign Affairs; but the Emperor desired, no doubt, to show a special attention on this occasion to the agent of the United States. In this interview Mr. Faulkner was retained a long time in friendly conversation with his Majesty, in which the latter displayed that wonderful general knowledge of affairs all over the world for which he is remarkable, and recalled in all its details, with many expressions of delight, his visit to the United States. He spoke of his astonishment at the wonderful activity of New York after arriving from sluggish Europe. He referred at length to the war fears of England, and denounced accomplish this by remaining the friend and ally of England. To suppose that he would go to war with England for revenge was a small compliment to his statesmanship. The Emperor was warm in his expressions of friendship to the people of the United States, and promised his good will in the conclusion of a new commercial treaty.