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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 14, 1860., [Electronic resource].

Found 698 total hits in 325 results.

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"Old Abe" in effigy, when they were fired on, and one of them shot by Jno. M. Barre, who was afterwards arrested by the citizens, and after receiving forty lashes, was placed in jail. Bishop Davis, of the Diocese of South Carolina, has set forth a prayer, which is " to be used before the two final prayers of morning and evening service, on all occasions during the ensuing session or sessions of our Legislature." In the South Carolina Legislature, Saturday, the following took place: Mr. Whaley said he held in his hand a resolution which he was certain would meet a cordial response from every member of this assembly. It was as follows: Resolved, That the resignation of the Hon. Jas. Chesnut as one of the U. S. Senators from South Carolina be accepted; and that what, under any other circumstances, would have been regarded with regret, is now recognized as an act of loyalty to the State of South Carolina. Unanimously adopted, and sent to the Senate for concurrence.
Cunningham (search for this): article 1
id he held in his hand a resolution which he was certain would meet a cordial response from every member of this assembly. It was as follows: Resolved, That the resignation of the Hon. Jas. Chesnut as one of the U. S. Senators from South Carolina be accepted; and that what, under any other circumstances, would have been regarded with regret, is now recognized as an act of loyalty to the State of South Carolina. Unanimously adopted, and sent to the Senate for concurrence. Mr. Cunningham moved to proceed to the general orders with a view to take up a bill to arm the State. He thought it important that the bill should get a reading in the Senate today if they wished to facilitate the business before the House. At the request of Mr. Aldrich, the motion was withdrawn to permit a report to be made from the Committee on Federal Relations. Mr. Aldrich then presented the report. The report recommends an amendment to the Senate bill for the call of a Convention, naming the 6
December 6th (search for this): article 1
oved to proceed to the general orders with a view to take up a bill to arm the State. He thought it important that the bill should get a reading in the Senate today if they wished to facilitate the business before the House. At the request of Mr. Aldrich, the motion was withdrawn to permit a report to be made from the Committee on Federal Relations. Mr. Aldrich then presented the report. The report recommends an amendment to the Senate bill for the call of a Convention, naming the 6th day of December as the time for the election of delegates, instead of the 6th of January, and the 17th December as the time for meeting, instead of the 10th of January, as named in the Senate bill. Mr. W. C. Black said he was exceedingly sorry to oppose the amendment. He was perfectly willing to vote for the Convention, to go with the State, and, when she goes, to go as far as the farthest. But he could not agree to the amendment proposed by the House Committee to the Senate bill, and hoped th
December 17th (search for this): article 1
t important that the bill should get a reading in the Senate today if they wished to facilitate the business before the House. At the request of Mr. Aldrich, the motion was withdrawn to permit a report to be made from the Committee on Federal Relations. Mr. Aldrich then presented the report. The report recommends an amendment to the Senate bill for the call of a Convention, naming the 6th day of December as the time for the election of delegates, instead of the 6th of January, and the 17th December as the time for meeting, instead of the 10th of January, as named in the Senate bill. Mr. W. C. Black said he was exceedingly sorry to oppose the amendment. He was perfectly willing to vote for the Convention, to go with the State, and, when she goes, to go as far as the farthest. But he could not agree to the amendment proposed by the House Committee to the Senate bill, and hoped the House would not accept the amendment. It was absolutely necessary that those who represented lar
January 10th (search for this): article 1
enate today if they wished to facilitate the business before the House. At the request of Mr. Aldrich, the motion was withdrawn to permit a report to be made from the Committee on Federal Relations. Mr. Aldrich then presented the report. The report recommends an amendment to the Senate bill for the call of a Convention, naming the 6th day of December as the time for the election of delegates, instead of the 6th of January, and the 17th December as the time for meeting, instead of the 10th of January, as named in the Senate bill. Mr. W. C. Black said he was exceedingly sorry to oppose the amendment. He was perfectly willing to vote for the Convention, to go with the State, and, when she goes, to go as far as the farthest. But he could not agree to the amendment proposed by the House Committee to the Senate bill, and hoped the House would not accept the amendment. It was absolutely necessary that those who represented large districts, the people of which were not so thoroughl
James Chesnut (search for this): article 1
The Threatening secession. affairs in South Carolina--Acceptance of Senator Chesnut's resignation — the Southern Press. &c., &c. The feeling in South Carolina for secession seems steadily to advance. In the legislative debates the only difference in the views of members is about the rapidity with which the act shall be consummated. The resigned Federal officers of Charleston were in Columbia Saturday, and being serenaded made speeches of the same tenor of those delivered b, Saturday, the following took place: Mr. Whaley said he held in his hand a resolution which he was certain would meet a cordial response from every member of this assembly. It was as follows: Resolved, That the resignation of the Hon. Jas. Chesnut as one of the U. S. Senators from South Carolina be accepted; and that what, under any other circumstances, would have been regarded with regret, is now recognized as an act of loyalty to the State of South Carolina. Unanimously ado
ummated. The resigned Federal officers of Charleston were in Columbia Saturday, and being serenaded made speeches of the same tenor of those delivered by them a few nights since, in the former city. On Saturday evening, at the town of Mount Pleasant, S. C. , some while boys, aided by negroes, were burning "Old Abe" in effigy, when they were fired on, and one of them shot by Jno. M. Barre, who was afterwards arrested by the citizens, and after receiving forty lashes, was placed in jail. Bishop Davis, of the Diocese of South Carolina, has set forth a prayer, which is " to be used before the two final prayers of morning and evening service, on all occasions during the ensuing session or sessions of our Legislature." In the South Carolina Legislature, Saturday, the following took place: Mr. Whaley said he held in his hand a resolution which he was certain would meet a cordial response from every member of this assembly. It was as follows: Resolved, That the resignation of th
January 6th (search for this): article 1
the State. He thought it important that the bill should get a reading in the Senate today if they wished to facilitate the business before the House. At the request of Mr. Aldrich, the motion was withdrawn to permit a report to be made from the Committee on Federal Relations. Mr. Aldrich then presented the report. The report recommends an amendment to the Senate bill for the call of a Convention, naming the 6th day of December as the time for the election of delegates, instead of the 6th of January, and the 17th December as the time for meeting, instead of the 10th of January, as named in the Senate bill. Mr. W. C. Black said he was exceedingly sorry to oppose the amendment. He was perfectly willing to vote for the Convention, to go with the State, and, when she goes, to go as far as the farthest. But he could not agree to the amendment proposed by the House Committee to the Senate bill, and hoped the House would not accept the amendment. It was absolutely necessary that th
ved to proceed to the general orders with a view to take up a bill to arm the State. He thought it important that the bill should get a reading in the Senate today if they wished to facilitate the business before the House. At the request of Mr. Aldrich, the motion was withdrawn to permit a report to be made from the Committee on Federal Relations. Mr. Aldrich then presented the report. The report recommends an amendment to the Senate bill for the call of a Convention, naming the 6th day ofMr. Aldrich then presented the report. The report recommends an amendment to the Senate bill for the call of a Convention, naming the 6th day of December as the time for the election of delegates, instead of the 6th of January, and the 17th December as the time for meeting, instead of the 10th of January, as named in the Senate bill. Mr. W. C. Black said he was exceedingly sorry to oppose the amendment. He was perfectly willing to vote for the Convention, to go with the State, and, when she goes, to go as far as the farthest. But he could not agree to the amendment proposed by the House Committee to the Senate bill, and hoped th
W. C. Black (search for this): article 1
ss before the House. At the request of Mr. Aldrich, the motion was withdrawn to permit a report to be made from the Committee on Federal Relations. Mr. Aldrich then presented the report. The report recommends an amendment to the Senate bill for the call of a Convention, naming the 6th day of December as the time for the election of delegates, instead of the 6th of January, and the 17th December as the time for meeting, instead of the 10th of January, as named in the Senate bill. Mr. W. C. Black said he was exceedingly sorry to oppose the amendment. He was perfectly willing to vote for the Convention, to go with the State, and, when she goes, to go as far as the farthest. But he could not agree to the amendment proposed by the House Committee to the Senate bill, and hoped the House would not accept the amendment. It was absolutely necessary that those who represented large districts, the people of which were not so thoroughly posted up as to the events transpiring around the
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