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acceptably in Congress from the "Old Ninety six District," once represented by Calhoun and McDuffie, and now forming part of the Congressional District lately represented by Preston S. Brooks, and for the last time in the Congress of the United States by M. L. Bonham. Mr. Pickens, after retiring from Congress, remained some years in private life, and last appeared before his fellow-citizens in this State as President of the Convention which nominated delegates to the Cincinnati Convention of 1856. He was appointed by President Buchanan to the Court of St. Petersburg, and has lately returned at his own request. He bears a name conspicuous in the service of the State, in council and in arms, and his own record gives full guarantees that he will never err in want of devotion to the State. W. W. Harlee, of Marion, has been elected Lieutenant Governor--a worthy choice in all respects. A letter, noticing the duties of the office, says: The office of Governor is not one general
he steamer Peytona; some of them were branded with the letters G. B. (gin burners) before shipped. Fourteen gins have been burned in this county during the last six weeks, and the people have determined to stop it. An Abolitionist was hanged, barrelled up, and rolled into the river at this point last week, and it was probably to avenge his death that the last gins were fired. A negro implicated the men who were hung. He said that they had told him all the negroes were to be free next March, when Lincoln becomes President, and that there will be a general rising of the negroes then. The vigilance committee have sworn to hang every Northern man who comes here from this time until the 4th of March, and all such had better be in h--1 than Friar's Point. Position of Senator Wilson. Senator Wilson's letter to Hon. Caleb Cushing is out. It is mainly devoted to the exhuming of the declarations of Gen. Cushing in opposition to slavery, made from three to thirty years ago, and
munication with the Gulf of Mexico as an impossibility. They will have free course to go down the Mississippi, and will insist upon Pensacola as a naval depot. He also gives, it is said, an elaborate statement of the disposition of the military forces of the nation, and the condition and needs of the fortified places. County meetings in Virginia. In Wythe, Halifax, Northampton and London, meetings were held last week, at all of which resolutions were adopted declaring that this is the time for a final settlement of the difficulties between the North and South. A meeting was held in Clarke county, on the 12th inst. The resolutions declare, among other things, "that we believe that in all human probability the extreme South will withdraw from the Union, and that the interests of Virginia and the South are one; that we should resist any attempt to coerce a seceding State; and that the Government has no right to collect revenues in a State that has withdrawn from the Union.
gs to go on, or whether they will make one last grand effort to see whether this sentiment can be corrected. You cannot send forth a stream by any natural process that will rise higher than a fountain. The South know it. They have no faith in addresses and resolutions that have not their sources in the feelings of the masses of the people. It is useless to say there is no serious trouble. I believe that South Carolina will secede, so far as the movement of her Convention can do it, on the 17th or 18th of this month, and events must transpire shortly after which will bring all cotton States in association with her, and eventually every State which is a slave State, and intends to continue such, will go along together. This is as certain as the laws of gravity, and he is a blind man and madman who cannot see it. All that we can now do is to get time to convince the Southern people that there is a returning sentiment of truth and justice in the Northern States; that the honest masses
Old Ninety six District," once represented by Calhoun and McDuffie, and now forming part of the Congressional District lately represented by Preston S. Brooks, and for the last time in the Congress of the United States by M. L. Bonham. Mr. Pickens, after retiring from Congress, remained some years in private life, and last appeared before his fellow-citizens in this State as President of the Convention which nominated delegates to the Cincinnati Convention of 1856. He was appointed by President Buchanan to the Court of St. Petersburg, and has lately returned at his own request. He bears a name conspicuous in the service of the State, in council and in arms, and his own record gives full guarantees that he will never err in want of devotion to the State. W. W. Harlee, of Marion, has been elected Lieutenant Governor--a worthy choice in all respects. A letter, noticing the duties of the office, says: The office of Governor is not one generally sought after in South Carolina.
Walter Scott (search for this): article 1
the nullification excitement in Charleston. An eulogistic biographer of General Scott thus relates a happy incident connected with the nullification excitement in, South Carolina, in 32. To appreciate the delicacy of this timely act of General Scott, it must be known that the Charlestonians, who were almost continually under arms during the presence of General Scott and the United States forces at Fort Moultrie, had strongly barricaded with cotton bales, &c., all the wharves facing the Charleston, rapidly spreading, and threatening the city with destruction.--General Scott happened to be the first who perceived the conflagration, and with great pr, and it would have been successful on any other day but the debtors. General Scott on secession. A telegraphic report from Washington city says that GenerGeneral Scott has given the President an elaborate opinion in reference to the present condition of the military defences of the country, and what should be done in view
tate was severed, and, therewith, the allegiance of these officials in no respect due the United States, but merely as the agents of a foreign government, tolerated for convenience. Great objection was expressed in the Committee to this, Senator Moses especially urging that this would derogate from the high position of South Carolina; that we were now prepared for all the inconveniences that would ensure on the cessation of the mail, and we should bear that with the same fortitude that, a short time previous, we were compelled to encounter a war all along the border. Mr. Moses said he regarded the proposition as presenting the analogy of a gentleman holding the office of Federal Judge. How could he discharge the functions of his office and yet owe an undivided allegiance to the State after secession? Mr. Maclarlan, of the House Committee, maintained similar views, stating that he had no information to warrant the resolution proposed. There might be information in the
ches of Lincoln, Seward, &c., to show that the Republican doctrines are based upon non-intervention regarding slavery, and the recognition of State rights in the fullest sense. The New Governor of South Carolina. The Charleston Courier, announcing the election of Francis W. Pickens, Governor of South Carolina, says: Mr. Pickens is too well known to many readers to require any particulars. He served acceptably in Congress from the "Old Ninety six District," once represented by Calhoun and McDuffie, and now forming part of the Congressional District lately represented by Preston S. Brooks, and for the last time in the Congress of the United States by M. L. Bonham. Mr. Pickens, after retiring from Congress, remained some years in private life, and last appeared before his fellow-citizens in this State as President of the Convention which nominated delegates to the Cincinnati Convention of 1856. He was appointed by President Buchanan to the Court of St. Petersburg, and has
hese officials be United States officials or not? Mr. Shannon said he would address himself further to the subject, and he had no doubt but that the Committee could agree upon the proposition; but he preferred that their deliberations should be conducted in a more private manner. The excitement in Mississippi--hanging of three Men. The hanging of three men at Friar's Point, Miss., has been briefly noticed. The Nashville Gazette publishes a letter from a merchant there, dated the 11th inst., giving the following particulars: On yesterday evening two gins and a negro quarter were fired simultaneously, doubtless by the procurement of these wretches. The night was lit up for miles around. The vigilance committee were soon under arms, and proceeded to the room of three carpenters, one by the name of Hamlin, the others unknown, and took them and hung them to the first tree, and afterward cut them down and burned them. The town is now under arms, the military are parading
on, or whether they will make one last grand effort to see whether this sentiment can be corrected. You cannot send forth a stream by any natural process that will rise higher than a fountain. The South know it. They have no faith in addresses and resolutions that have not their sources in the feelings of the masses of the people. It is useless to say there is no serious trouble. I believe that South Carolina will secede, so far as the movement of her Convention can do it, on the 17th or 18th of this month, and events must transpire shortly after which will bring all cotton States in association with her, and eventually every State which is a slave State, and intends to continue such, will go along together. This is as certain as the laws of gravity, and he is a blind man and madman who cannot see it. All that we can now do is to get time to convince the Southern people that there is a returning sentiment of truth and justice in the Northern States; that the honest masses have be
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