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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 21, 1861., [Electronic resource].

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it. Force may be employed against masses of individuals, however numerous; never against political communities or States." "The Southern people are unconquerable.--The race which peoples these; States can never be held in bondage. New political systems must now be constructed, and let us hope that, under the guidance of Him who sitteth upon the circle of the heavens, the South and the North may yet dwell together in peace." 17th January, 1780-1861. The Charleston Mercury, of the 17th inst., says: This anniversary of the battle of the Cow-pens finds our citizen soldiers in the field, called there to defend their homes and firesides, their wives and children, from the armed hostility of a corrupt and perverted Government. The usual holiday parade is wanting, the gay uniform has disappeared, and in its place our ear catches the now familiar tread of armed men--brave lads in grey"--who stand ready to breast the storm of vulgar tyranny which threatens the dear old Com
to determine the future inter. State and Federal relations of Kentucky. Meanwhile, he would leave no experiment untried to restore fraternal relations between the States. He recommends a Convention of the border Slave States, to meet early in February, at Baltimore. The Governor says the hasty and inconsiderate action of the seceding States does not meet our approval, but Kentuckians will never stand by with folded arms while those States, struggling for their constitutional rights, are beind appointing a committee to report an Ordinance of Secession, Hon. Herschel V. Johnson introduced a series of resolutions as a substitute for those adopted, looking to co- operation and inviting a Convention of the Southern States at Atlanta, in February. The resolutions were lost. During the debate which took place Hon. A. H. Stephens said that if Georgia determined to secede, the sooner she did so the better. At night the flag of independence waved from the Capitol, cannon were fire
tread of armed men--brave lads in grey"--who stand ready to breast the storm of vulgar tyranny which threatens the dear old Commonwealth of South Carolina. Victory perched upon the standards of their ancestors eighty years ago; the lesson of duty then taught is remembered, and the crimson flag which heralded the way to glory then, is ready again to be thrown to the breeze in the cause of constitutional liberty — equality. Gen. Henningsen. The Montgomery (Ala.) Advertiser, of the 14th, says: Gen. C. F. Henningsen, of Nicaragua notoriety, arrived in this city on Saturday night last, and will probably remain some days.--He has had much experience in military affairs, and is possessed of that true heroism which is so serviceable in "times that try men's souls." We are glad to know that this chivalric gentleman is with the Southern States, heart and hand, in their efforts to rid themselves of Black Republican domination, and we doubt not is ready and willing to go into
resent territory after the admission of Kansas, reserving the right of admission with proper restrictions, or to divide the territory after the manner of the Missouri Compromise. The President and the New York Legislature. The following communication to the New York Legislature was read in the Assembly on Wednesday: To his Excellency Gov. Morgan: Sir: I have had the honor to receive your communication, covering the resolutions which passed the Legislature of New York on the 11th instant, tendering aid to the President of the United States, in support of the Constitution and the Union, and shall give them that respectful consideration to which they are entitled from the importance of the subject and the distinguished source from which they have emanated. Your, very respectfully, James Buchanan. Opposed to coercion. The New York World contains a letter from Hon. Henry W. Hilliard, of Alabama, from which the following is an extract: "Now that some of
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): article 1
The National crisis. Public Sentiment in Virginia — Proclamation of Lincoln's Policy — Indignation of New York Troops — Things at Charleston — Interesting Incidents, &c.,&c.,&c. From the tone of the newspapers, and correspondence from vari emergency. We append a summary of information from other quarters, bearing upon the crisis in national affairs Lincoln's position Defined. The New York Tribune makes the following apparently official editorial announcement. It will be seen that Mr. Lincoln not only opposes any concession to the South, but threatens means of coercion: The question having anew been raised, we mean it proper to say again what we have said before, and we wish to be understood as saying it authoritatively, that President Lincoln is not in favor of making concessions to the slave power, either pretended concessions or real concessions, nor in favor of any measure looking to the humiliation of freedom and of the free States, no matter in wh
Herschel V. Johnson (search for this): article 1
made good use of the opportunity.--All were anxious that Mr. Ruffin should fill one barrow for them at least, so that by the time he had performed the requests of all I have no doubt was satisfied to get away. Missouri and the crisis. Mr. Johnson, chairman of the Committee of Federal Relations, introduced a bill in the Senate, on Wednesday, which provides that the Governor shall appoint one Commissioner from each Congressional district to a consulting Convention of the States, to be hed willing to go into the field in their defence. The Georgia Convention. After the passage of the resolutions declaring it the right and duty of Georgia to secede, and appointing a committee to report an Ordinance of Secession, Hon. Herschel V. Johnson introduced a series of resolutions as a substitute for those adopted, looking to co- operation and inviting a Convention of the Southern States at Atlanta, in February. The resolutions were lost. During the debate which took place
Montgomery (search for this): article 1
se for the pick-axe, and with the shovel I have seen the slave work all round the white man and then turn round and grin at what he had done. Among the passengers in our cabin was Edmund Ruffin, of Virginia. This gentleman has been in the South since the commencement of the secession movement. I noticed his venerable face in the Sovereign Convention almost every day. Since the adjournment of that body he has been through Florida and Alabama, and I believe remained in Tallahassee and Montgomery until after the passage of the Ordinance of Secession. By way of recreation he visited the fortifications of the harbor on this occasion. As a companion and pleasant talker, I have met with few men I like better than Mr. Ruffin. He is full of information and ready to impart it. He is withal quite a secessionist, and as a matter of course readily finds congeniality of sentiment in this latitude. He seems to take quite an interest in the excitements of the day, and is hated everywher
anew been raised, we mean it proper to say again what we have said before, and we wish to be understood as saying it authoritatively, that President Lincoln is not in favor of making concessions to the slave power, either pretended concessions or real concessions, nor in favor of any measure looking to the humiliation of freedom and of the free States, no matter in what pretense they may be commended. He believes, with the great body of the independent freemen of the country — Democrats, Bell men, and Republicans — that the first duty to be done is to ascertain whether we have a government or not, and whether the Union is a mere delusion of the imagination, to be dissolved at the first touch of actual hostility, or a great and vital power, as competent to assert itself and defend itself against domestic sedition as against foreign foes. We have reason to know that he perceives and feels clearly that this is the predominant question of the time, towering above every other. Indeed
January 17th (search for this): article 1
ls in the United States Court in this city, three persons, one a deputy United States Marshal, and the other two Kentuckians, acting for the owner, were arrested and indicted for a penitentiary offence for arresting a fugitive slave under the law of Congress for the rendition of fugitives from service." It was framed and has the effect to nullify the fugitive slave law of Congress. The Border States proposition. New York, Jan. 18.--A meeting of prominent merchants was held here this afternoon, when a memorial to Congress was adopted recommending the adoption of the compromise plan proposed by the Border States' Representatives. Boston, Jan. 17.--Petitions to Congress will be signed to-morrow in all the wards of this city approving of the plan of adjustment of the Border States' Committee. A patriotic editor. The publication of the Kingstree (S. C.) Star has been suspended. The editor, foreman and printers have all taken up arms in the service of the State.
March 4th (search for this): article 1
, should he be called upon to assist in maintaining the integrity of the Union. Very patriotic — or very ambitious to see his name in the papers: hard to determine which. Better wait till he receives orders to offer that which he has no authority of himself to grant. The First Division would no doubt be prompt to render any aid in their power to maintain the integrity of the Union, which is dear as life to most of them. But I, for one, as an old member, would like to say that if the fourth of March should come round without proper concessions having been made — concessions just, lawful and constitutional, to allay the storm and guarantee security to every one of the States of this Union--I would be happy to join the First Division and proceed to Washington to stay the inauguration of the power which has caused the deplorable state of affairs now existing, till sufficient guarantee is given that the agitating causes will be ignored, and the rendering of the Constitution, as it has
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