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January 17th (search for this): article 1
ls in the United States Court in this city, three persons, one a deputy United States Marshal, and the other two Kentuckians, acting for the owner, were arrested and indicted for a penitentiary offence for arresting a fugitive slave under the law of Congress for the rendition of fugitives from service." It was framed and has the effect to nullify the fugitive slave law of Congress. The Border States proposition. New York, Jan. 18.--A meeting of prominent merchants was held here this afternoon, when a memorial to Congress was adopted recommending the adoption of the compromise plan proposed by the Border States' Representatives. Boston, Jan. 17.--Petitions to Congress will be signed to-morrow in all the wards of this city approving of the plan of adjustment of the Border States' Committee. A patriotic editor. The publication of the Kingstree (S. C.) Star has been suspended. The editor, foreman and printers have all taken up arms in the service of the State.
January 18th (search for this): article 1
A petition praying for the adoption of the Crittenden propositions by Congress, bearing nearly 6,000 names, has been forwarded to Washington. St, Louis, January 18.--In the House yesterday Mr. Stevenson's substitute for the Convention bill, asking Congress to call a National Convention, was lost--104 to 12. Mr. Lacey'srce in any form against the seceding States, and asks appropriations for arming and equipping a volunteer militia. Important from Louisiana. New Orleans, Jan. 18.--The programme for Louisiana's secession is already agreed upon by the leading members of the Convention.--Arrangements are being perfected among the seced of fugitives from service." It was framed and has the effect to nullify the fugitive slave law of Congress. The Border States proposition. New York, Jan. 18.--A meeting of prominent merchants was held here this afternoon, when a memorial to Congress was adopted recommending the adoption of the compromise plan proposed
to determine the future inter. State and Federal relations of Kentucky. Meanwhile, he would leave no experiment untried to restore fraternal relations between the States. He recommends a Convention of the border Slave States, to meet early in February, at Baltimore. The Governor says the hasty and inconsiderate action of the seceding States does not meet our approval, but Kentuckians will never stand by with folded arms while those States, struggling for their constitutional rights, are beind appointing a committee to report an Ordinance of Secession, Hon. Herschel V. Johnson introduced a series of resolutions as a substitute for those adopted, looking to co- operation and inviting a Convention of the Southern States at Atlanta, in February. The resolutions were lost. During the debate which took place Hon. A. H. Stephens said that if Georgia determined to secede, the sooner she did so the better. At night the flag of independence waved from the Capitol, cannon were fire
February 20th (search for this): article 1
e to declare by a resolution the unconditional disapprobation by Kentucky of the employment of force in any form against the seceding States, and asks appropriations for arming and equipping a volunteer militia. Important from Louisiana. New Orleans, Jan. 18.--The programme for Louisiana's secession is already agreed upon by the leading members of the Convention.--Arrangements are being perfected among the seceding States for holding a general Convention at Montgomery, on the 20th February, to devise the plan of the new Confederacy, to adopt the Federal Constitution, claim title, and ask recognition by the European Powers and the United States. The President's message is strongly animadverted on as his weakest production, deploring the condition of the country without assuming any position. Forts Jackson and St. Philip are to be largely reinforced for the defence of the months of the Mississippi. It is contemplated to fit out privateers should coercion be attem
March 4th (search for this): article 1
, should he be called upon to assist in maintaining the integrity of the Union. Very patriotic — or very ambitious to see his name in the papers: hard to determine which. Better wait till he receives orders to offer that which he has no authority of himself to grant. The First Division would no doubt be prompt to render any aid in their power to maintain the integrity of the Union, which is dear as life to most of them. But I, for one, as an old member, would like to say that if the fourth of March should come round without proper concessions having been made — concessions just, lawful and constitutional, to allay the storm and guarantee security to every one of the States of this Union--I would be happy to join the First Division and proceed to Washington to stay the inauguration of the power which has caused the deplorable state of affairs now existing, till sufficient guarantee is given that the agitating causes will be ignored, and the rendering of the Constitution, as it has
January 17th, 1861 BC (search for this): article 1
he whole theory of our government is opposed to it. Force may be employed against masses of individuals, however numerous; never against political communities or States." "The Southern people are unconquerable.--The race which peoples these; States can never be held in bondage. New political systems must now be constructed, and let us hope that, under the guidance of Him who sitteth upon the circle of the heavens, the South and the North may yet dwell together in peace." 17th January, 1780-1861. The Charleston Mercury, of the 17th inst., says: This anniversary of the battle of the Cow-pens finds our citizen soldiers in the field, called there to defend their homes and firesides, their wives and children, from the armed hostility of a corrupt and perverted Government. The usual holiday parade is wanting, the gay uniform has disappeared, and in its place our ear catches the now familiar tread of armed men--brave lads in grey"--who stand ready to breast the storm of
resent territory after the admission of Kansas, reserving the right of admission with proper restrictions, or to divide the territory after the manner of the Missouri Compromise. The President and the New York Legislature. The following communication to the New York Legislature was read in the Assembly on Wednesday: To his Excellency Gov. Morgan: Sir: I have had the honor to receive your communication, covering the resolutions which passed the Legislature of New York on the 11th instant, tendering aid to the President of the United States, in support of the Constitution and the Union, and shall give them that respectful consideration to which they are entitled from the importance of the subject and the distinguished source from which they have emanated. Your, very respectfully, James Buchanan. Opposed to coercion. The New York World contains a letter from Hon. Henry W. Hilliard, of Alabama, from which the following is an extract: "Now that some of
June, 11 AD (search for this): article 1
hat avail is any compromise or any arrangement whatever until it be first established that the Union of the States and the Federal Government are something real and living, and not a precarious sham, built of nothing more substantial than parchment and red tape, and existing at the mercy of speaking traitors like Floyd, or noisy ones like Toombs. No compromises, then! No delusive and deluding concessions! No surrender of principle! No cowardly reversal of the Great Verdict of the sixth of November! Let us have the question of questions settled now and for all time! There can never be another opportunity so good as the present. Let us know once for all whether the slave power is really stronger than the Union. Let us have it decided whether the Mexican system of rebellion can be successfully introduced in this country as a means of carrying an election after it has been fairly lost at the polls. It will be time enough to talk of redressing grievances of long standing and of
tread of armed men--brave lads in grey"--who stand ready to breast the storm of vulgar tyranny which threatens the dear old Commonwealth of South Carolina. Victory perched upon the standards of their ancestors eighty years ago; the lesson of duty then taught is remembered, and the crimson flag which heralded the way to glory then, is ready again to be thrown to the breeze in the cause of constitutional liberty — equality. Gen. Henningsen. The Montgomery (Ala.) Advertiser, of the 14th, says: Gen. C. F. Henningsen, of Nicaragua notoriety, arrived in this city on Saturday night last, and will probably remain some days.--He has had much experience in military affairs, and is possessed of that true heroism which is so serviceable in "times that try men's souls." We are glad to know that this chivalric gentleman is with the Southern States, heart and hand, in their efforts to rid themselves of Black Republican domination, and we doubt not is ready and willing to go into
it. Force may be employed against masses of individuals, however numerous; never against political communities or States." "The Southern people are unconquerable.--The race which peoples these; States can never be held in bondage. New political systems must now be constructed, and let us hope that, under the guidance of Him who sitteth upon the circle of the heavens, the South and the North may yet dwell together in peace." 17th January, 1780-1861. The Charleston Mercury, of the 17th inst., says: This anniversary of the battle of the Cow-pens finds our citizen soldiers in the field, called there to defend their homes and firesides, their wives and children, from the armed hostility of a corrupt and perverted Government. The usual holiday parade is wanting, the gay uniform has disappeared, and in its place our ear catches the now familiar tread of armed men--brave lads in grey"--who stand ready to breast the storm of vulgar tyranny which threatens the dear old Com
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