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Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): article 1
, of Virginia. This gentleman has been in the South since the commencement of the secession movement. I noticed his venerable face in the Sovereign Convention almost every day. Since the adjournment of that body he has been through Florida and Alabama, and I believe remained in Tallahassee and Montgomery until after the passage of the Ordinance of Secession. By way of recreation he visited the fortifications of the harbor on this occasion. As a companion and pleasant talker, I have met entitled from the importance of the subject and the distinguished source from which they have emanated. Your, very respectfully, James Buchanan. Opposed to coercion. The New York World contains a letter from Hon. Henry W. Hilliard, of Alabama, from which the following is an extract: "Now that some of the States have dissolved their connection with the Union, force is not to be employed against them. The whole theory of our government is opposed to it. Force may be employed aga
Fort Moultrie (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
ginia was, and' what the Southerners would have her be. He likewise expresses a lively hope and abiding confidence in the ultimate secession of his State. Fort Moultrie. The correspondent, in describing the fortifications, thus describes the works at Fort Moultrie: At Fort Moultrie, Sunday though it was, everything waFort Moultrie: At Fort Moultrie, Sunday though it was, everything was busy. The columbiads spiked and burned by Anderson, are all, with the exception of three, remounted on new carriages, unspiked, and as good as ever. Several of the merlons erected upon the parapet to protect the guns bearing on Sumter are completed.--The work is done in a most masterly manner. Barrels and bags of sand are so dFort Moultrie, Sunday though it was, everything was busy. The columbiads spiked and burned by Anderson, are all, with the exception of three, remounted on new carriages, unspiked, and as good as ever. Several of the merlons erected upon the parapet to protect the guns bearing on Sumter are completed.--The work is done in a most masterly manner. Barrels and bags of sand are so disposed and evenly packed as to give a solid masonry-like appearance. The merlons are very thick and impenetrable, and afford great security to the artillerists behind them. The process of constructing this sort of defence is in this manner: The bomb-proof surface of the parapet is turned up and rows of barrels of sand are pl
Wheeling, W. Va. (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
from each Congressional district to a consulting Convention of the States, to be held at Nashville on the 4th of February, to agree upon a common issue by way of amendment to the Constitution to be made by the slave States, and the result to be laid before the Convention called in the third section. To that Convention the Governor is directed to appoint three Commissioners from Missouri to meet three Commissioners from each of the thirty- three States. The latter Convention to be held at Wheeling, on the 11th of February, for the purpose of adjusting the present difficulties, to preserve the Union and to avert civil war. The Governor is also required to appoint one Commissioner to proceed to Illinois, and request the Legislature to second the movement and use its influence with the other free States to have conservative men appointed to the Wheeling Convention. The bill was amended by the adoption of a provision similar to that contained in the Virginia bill, submitting the act
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 1
heir efforts to rid themselves of Black Republican domination, and we doubt not is ready and willing to go into the field in their defence. The Georgia Convention. After the passage of the resolutions declaring it the right and duty of Georgia to secede, and appointing a committee to report an Ordinance of Secession, Hon. Herschel V. Johnson introduced a series of resolutions as a substitute for those adopted, looking to co- operation and inviting a Convention of the Southern States at Atlanta, in February. The resolutions were lost. During the debate which took place Hon. A. H. Stephens said that if Georgia determined to secede, the sooner she did so the better. At night the flag of independence waved from the Capitol, cannon were fired, fireworks displayed, and other demonstrations of rejoicing were made at the passage of the secession resolutions. The Ohio personal liberty bill. The Ohio House of Representatives, by a vote of 58 to 31, has indefinite
Herschel V. Johnson (search for this): article 1
made good use of the opportunity.--All were anxious that Mr. Ruffin should fill one barrow for them at least, so that by the time he had performed the requests of all I have no doubt was satisfied to get away. Missouri and the crisis. Mr. Johnson, chairman of the Committee of Federal Relations, introduced a bill in the Senate, on Wednesday, which provides that the Governor shall appoint one Commissioner from each Congressional district to a consulting Convention of the States, to be hed willing to go into the field in their defence. The Georgia Convention. After the passage of the resolutions declaring it the right and duty of Georgia to secede, and appointing a committee to report an Ordinance of Secession, Hon. Herschel V. Johnson introduced a series of resolutions as a substitute for those adopted, looking to co- operation and inviting a Convention of the Southern States at Atlanta, in February. The resolutions were lost. During the debate which took place
anew been raised, we mean it proper to say again what we have said before, and we wish to be understood as saying it authoritatively, that President Lincoln is not in favor of making concessions to the slave power, either pretended concessions or real concessions, nor in favor of any measure looking to the humiliation of freedom and of the free States, no matter in what pretense they may be commended. He believes, with the great body of the independent freemen of the country — Democrats, Bell men, and Republicans — that the first duty to be done is to ascertain whether we have a government or not, and whether the Union is a mere delusion of the imagination, to be dissolved at the first touch of actual hostility, or a great and vital power, as competent to assert itself and defend itself against domestic sedition as against foreign foes. We have reason to know that he perceives and feels clearly that this is the predominant question of the time, towering above every other. Indeed
Richard Clough Anderson (search for this): article 1
ems to take quite an interest in the excitements of the day, and is hated everywhere as the representative of what Virginia was, and' what the Southerners would have her be. He likewise expresses a lively hope and abiding confidence in the ultimate secession of his State. Fort Moultrie. The correspondent, in describing the fortifications, thus describes the works at Fort Moultrie: At Fort Moultrie, Sunday though it was, everything was busy. The columbiads spiked and burned by Anderson, are all, with the exception of three, remounted on new carriages, unspiked, and as good as ever. Several of the merlons erected upon the parapet to protect the guns bearing on Sumter are completed.--The work is done in a most masterly manner. Barrels and bags of sand are so disposed and evenly packed as to give a solid masonry-like appearance. The merlons are very thick and impenetrable, and afford great security to the artillerists behind them. The process of constructing this sor
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): article 1
The National crisis. Public Sentiment in Virginia — Proclamation of Lincoln's Policy — Indignation of New York Troops — Things at Charleston — Interesting Incidents, &c.,&c.,&c. From the tone of the newspapers, and correspondence from vari emergency. We append a summary of information from other quarters, bearing upon the crisis in national affairs Lincoln's position Defined. The New York Tribune makes the following apparently official editorial announcement. It will be seen that Mr. Lincoln not only opposes any concession to the South, but threatens means of coercion: The question having anew been raised, we mean it proper to say again what we have said before, and we wish to be understood as saying it authoritatively, that President Lincoln is not in favor of making concessions to the slave power, either pretended concessions or real concessions, nor in favor of any measure looking to the humiliation of freedom and of the free States, no matter in wh
tion as against foreign foes. We have reason to know that he perceives and feels clearly that this is the predominant question of the time, towering above every other. Indeed, of what avail is any compromise or any arrangement whatever until it be first established that the Union of the States and the Federal Government are something real and living, and not a precarious sham, built of nothing more substantial than parchment and red tape, and existing at the mercy of speaking traitors like Floyd, or noisy ones like Toombs. No compromises, then! No delusive and deluding concessions! No surrender of principle! No cowardly reversal of the Great Verdict of the sixth of November! Let us have the question of questions settled now and for all time! There can never be another opportunity so good as the present. Let us know once for all whether the slave power is really stronger than the Union. Let us have it decided whether the Mexican system of rebellion can be successfully intr
harbor of Charleston, narrates some interesting incidents connected therewith. He says: At starting we had on board, in addition to the party of gentlemen in the suite of officials, going the rounds of the forts, about one hundred and fifty or two hundred hearty, strong negro men, intended for laborers on Sullivan's Island. These fellows chattered and jabbered their peculiar negro lingo with infinite delight at the prospect of becoming, as they termed it, "Roger's to fight for Sonny Carline." Rolled up in huge knots, wherever the sun shone, they dozed away in peaceful slumbers, or grinned with delight as anything pleasing to the fancy passed in review. The ideas and language interchanged among them, and to all who cause to address them, evinced almost barbaric simplicity. The majority of them exhibited a wonderfully stupid set of features. One of them, however, the most intelligent fellow in the lot, gave quite satisfactory answers to most of the inquiries propounded to him
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