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Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 5
overnment may be reassured by the people whensoever it shall become necessary to their happiness."--[Same as New York.] As to the right or claim of the Federal Government to forts, &c., in a State after the State has been withdrawn from the Union, and has resumed all powers and rights once delegated. In the case of Pollard's lessee vs. Hagan, 3 Howard, S. P. C. R., pages 222 and 223, the Court say: "Taking the legislative acts of the United States and the States of Virginia and Georgia, and their deeds of cession to the United States, and giving to each separately, and to all jointly, a fair interpretation, we must come to the conclusion that it was the intention of the parties to invest the United States with the eminent domain of the country ceded, both national and municipal, for the purpose of temporary government, and to hold it in trust for the performance of the stipulation and conditions expressed in the deeds of cession and the legislative acts connected wi
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 5
it,) do so in like manner, no matter how corrupt it is or may become.--These men would also give to this creature or agent unlimited and undefined rights and powers. The President, in his last message, says he intends to enforce the laws in South Carolina, although she is no longer in the Union.--He has as much right to put the laws which he refers to in force in England, France, &c., as he has in South Carolina. Why did not the President enforce the laws in the free States? These StatesSouth Carolina. Why did not the President enforce the laws in the free States? These States all claim to be now in the Union, yet they have for years past, and now are violating the Constitution and laws of the United States. The violation by the free States of these laws is the cause of all the evils now upon us: they are the source from which all these troubles have come upon us. Why don't the President now enforce the laws in the free States? He had better send his Major Anderson, Gen. Scotts, &c., there, and not make war upon sovereign States no longer under his jurisdiction. I
Rhode Island (Rhode Island, United States) (search for this): article 5
." --These were no proposed amendments, but they were declarations of right and of the common understanding in relation to the meaning of the Constitution. Virginia, in her ratification, declares and makes known "That the powers granted under the Constitution, being derived from the people of the United States, may be resumed by them whenever the same shall be perverted to their injury or oppression, and that every power not granted thereby, remains with them and at their will." Rhode Island, when she ratified the Constitution of the United States, expressly declared "That the powers of government may be reassured by the people whensoever it shall become necessary to their happiness."--[Same as New York.] As to the right or claim of the Federal Government to forts, &c., in a State after the State has been withdrawn from the Union, and has resumed all powers and rights once delegated. In the case of Pollard's lessee vs. Hagan, 3 Howard, S. P. C. R., pages 222 and 223,
France (France) (search for this): article 5
y term it, the Union, up as an idol, which they worship, and which they would have the States (which are the creators of it,) do so in like manner, no matter how corrupt it is or may become.--These men would also give to this creature or agent unlimited and undefined rights and powers. The President, in his last message, says he intends to enforce the laws in South Carolina, although she is no longer in the Union.--He has as much right to put the laws which he refers to in force in England, France, &c., as he has in South Carolina. Why did not the President enforce the laws in the free States? These States all claim to be now in the Union, yet they have for years past, and now are violating the Constitution and laws of the United States. The violation by the free States of these laws is the cause of all the evils now upon us: they are the source from which all these troubles have come upon us. Why don't the President now enforce the laws in the free States? He had better send
United States (United States) (search for this): article 5
e will of the majorityof the whole people of the United States would bind the minority. Each State, in ratifyiMadison again said, "That any government for the United States formed on the supposed practicability of using fnstitution, being derived from the people of the United States, may be resumed by them whenever the same shall rt say: "Taking the legislative acts of the United States and the States of Virginia and Georgia, and their deeds of cession to the United States, and giving to each separately, and to all jointly, a fair interpretatit was the intention of the parties to invest the United States with the eminent domain of the country ced The Court also say in the same case: "The United States has no constitutional capacity to exercise munict of the money of all the States, and before the United States has any right or power to build them in a State,w are violating the Constitution and laws of the United States. The violation by the free States of these laws
itution, is considered as a sovereign body, independent of all others, and only to be bound by its own voluntary act." --Madison, Federalist, page 152 "In the establishment of the Constitution, the States should be regarded as distinct and indeer of the Convention advocated force. Hamilton, the strong government man, rejected and denounced resorting to force. Mr. Madison said "the more he reflected on the use of force, the more he doubted the practicability, the justice and the efficacy al Government claim no longer to act under or by authority of the compact by which it was brought into existence. Mr. Madison again said, "That any government for the United States formed on the supposed practicability of using force against thme of the proceedings of the Convention which framed the Constitution, and you have before you the views of Hamilton and Madison, who helped to frame it, as to the rights of the States, and the powers of the Federal Government as to coercion and for
Richard Clough Anderson (search for this): article 5
laws which he refers to in force in England, France, &c., as he has in South Carolina. Why did not the President enforce the laws in the free States? These States all claim to be now in the Union, yet they have for years past, and now are violating the Constitution and laws of the United States. The violation by the free States of these laws is the cause of all the evils now upon us: they are the source from which all these troubles have come upon us. Why don't the President now enforce the laws in the free States? He had better send his Major Anderson, Gen. Scotts, &c., there, and not make war upon sovereign States no longer under his jurisdiction. I appeal to the young men of this country, and also to the old men, to examine the subjects I refer to for yourselves. Do not trust to the views and opinions of corrupt and designing demagogues and politicians. Inform yourselves of your State's rights, and protect and defend them, for yourselves and for your children. G.
Robert Howard (search for this): article 5
them and at their will." Rhode Island, when she ratified the Constitution of the United States, expressly declared "That the powers of government may be reassured by the people whensoever it shall become necessary to their happiness."--[Same as New York.] As to the right or claim of the Federal Government to forts, &c., in a State after the State has been withdrawn from the Union, and has resumed all powers and rights once delegated. In the case of Pollard's lessee vs. Hagan, 3 Howard, S. P. C. R., pages 222 and 223, the Court say: "Taking the legislative acts of the United States and the States of Virginia and Georgia, and their deeds of cession to the United States, and giving to each separately, and to all jointly, a fair interpretation, we must come to the conclusion that it was the intention of the parties to invest the United States with the eminent domain of the country ceded, both national and municipal, for the purpose of temporary government, and to h
laws which he refers to in force in England, France, &c., as he has in South Carolina. Why did not the President enforce the laws in the free States? These States all claim to be now in the Union, yet they have for years past, and now are violating the Constitution and laws of the United States. The violation by the free States of these laws is the cause of all the evils now upon us: they are the source from which all these troubles have come upon us. Why don't the President now enforce the laws in the free States? He had better send his Major Anderson, Gen. Scotts, &c., there, and not make war upon sovereign States no longer under his jurisdiction. I appeal to the young men of this country, and also to the old men, to examine the subjects I refer to for yourselves. Do not trust to the views and opinions of corrupt and designing demagogues and politicians. Inform yourselves of your State's rights, and protect and defend them, for yourselves and for your children. G.
Edmund Randolph (search for this): article 5
s of the Federal Government owes its 'existence to the State Governments.' The powers delegated to the Federal Government by the Constitution, are few and defined; those which remain in the State Governments are numerous and indefinite. The powers reserved to the several States will extend to all the objects which, in the ordinary course of affairs, concern the lives, liberties and properties of the people." --Ib., pages 186 and 187 In the Convention which framed the constitution, Edmund Randolph proposed to give the Federal Government power "to call forth the force of the Union against any member of the Union failing to fulfill its duties under the articles there of." Mr. Patterson also desired to be inserted in the Constitution, "And if any State, or body of men in any State, shall oppose or prevent the Carrying into executive such acts or treaties, the Federal Executive shall be authorized to call 10th the powers of the confederated States, or so much thereof as may be necess
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