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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: January 23, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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James D. F. Jamison (search for this): article 1
there will henceforth be separate Confederacies — and that men who have adorned the councils of the country notifies the Union are now engaged in the work of building up another organization, and conflicting anew the experiment of self-government, free from the sectional animosities which have produced the present wreck. The ladies of Charleston have sent a Carolina flag to headquarters. With the following note attached. From the. Ladies of Charleston to the Minister of war Jas. D. F. Jamison: This flag was made extremely by them to be opened for the first time on fort Saunder. Letter from Hon. Geo. W. Summers. Hon. Geo. W. Summers, one of the Commissioners appointed last week by the Virginia Legislature to a National Conference, has written a letter to a member of the House of Delegates, giving his views on the present crisis. The cause he sums up as follows: The sources of our present troubles, and the causes of the present wide-spread dissatisfaction in t
The National crisis. withdrawal of the Senators of the seceding States--letter from Hon. George W. Summers--from Charleston — the Florida Forts — the Key West fortifications — troops in Washington, &c. Senators Davis. Yulee, Mallory, Clay and Fitzpatrick, who formally withdrew from the Senate chamber, left ten vacant seats in the Senate. Four others will be speedily added.--The Washington Constitution, speaking of the rest, says. To those who scan events more closely, the withdrawals of yesterday, succeeding others for short distance cannot but suggest painful spottage. It were had enough, if in the ordinary mutations of politics the Senate were being stripped of its most illustrious members: Statesmen who have earned distinction by the ability, the patriotism, and the purity of their ,and whose voices have been ever polite opposition to the current demagogism of the day. But the spectacle witnessed yesterday and to be witnessed again are many days more ove<
ld go to make a livelihood in his declining years; that he had no adequate force to make resistance, and that if he had, notwithstanding the foregoing considerations, he would prefer the loss of his own life to the destruction of the lives of his fellow-countrymen. His voice trembled with emotion as he closed his brief and affecting remarks, by the announcement that he relinquished his authority to the representative of the sovereignty of Florida. The order was immediately given by Capt. Renshaw, flag officer, to haul down the flag of the Union, which was done; and, in lien thereof is another flag with thirteen alternate stripes of red and white, and blue field, with a large white star, announcing the changed political condition of our State. Everything was conducted in the most orderly and respectful manner, attended with a degree of solemn interest which was manifested upon the countenances of the hundreds of citizens and soldiers present. Fort Pickens, with 200 U. S. so
E. B. Hunt (search for this): article 1
We do not believe that he will. Latest from the Key West fortifications. A letter from Key West, dated the 12th inst., says: The U. S. steamship Crusader, Lt. Com. Moffett, arrived on the morning of the 11th inst., from Mobile, via Havana. She is now at the naval wharf, coaling. The U. S. steamship Mohawk, Lt. Com. Craven, is at the naval wharf, repairing her boilers. Fort Taylor is now garrisoned by a company of U. S. artillery, in command of Capt. J. M. Brannan. Capt. E. B. Hunt, U. S. Corps of Engineers, is still in command of the fort, and is actively engaged in completing the work designed to be done with the present appropriation. The fort is so far completed as to be made available in case of foreign invasion. The armament mounted is sufficient to enable the Federal officers to act on the defensive, if necessary. Troops in Washington. A dispatch from Washington dated the 22d inst., says: One company of Sappers and Miners, numbering sixty-t
f hostility that Anderson did at Moultrie, but we do believe that he will soon surrender the fort, as the commandant at Baton Rouge did the arsenal, on the grounds of the presence of an overwhelming force, and the plea of avoiding useless blood shedding. He is reported to have said he would not fire on his countrymen. We do not believe that he will. Latest from the Key West fortifications. A letter from Key West, dated the 12th inst., says: The U. S. steamship Crusader, Lt. Com. Moffett, arrived on the morning of the 11th inst., from Mobile, via Havana. She is now at the naval wharf, coaling. The U. S. steamship Mohawk, Lt. Com. Craven, is at the naval wharf, repairing her boilers. Fort Taylor is now garrisoned by a company of U. S. artillery, in command of Capt. J. M. Brannan. Capt. E. B. Hunt, U. S. Corps of Engineers, is still in command of the fort, and is actively engaged in completing the work designed to be done with the present appropriation. The fort
James H. North (search for this): article 1
mpliment to South Carolina, to her citizen soldiers, or to "the day we celebrate," has not transpired. Everything considered, it was possibly intended to remind all parties in the neighborhood that a foreign enemy was still tolerated in the waters of South Carolina. The entertainment was continued until 5 o'clock, and all the participants agree in the opinion that it was a delightful celebration. The rank and office of Captain in the Navy of South Carolina, have been conferred on James H. North, late Lieutenant in the U. S. Navy, and honorably distinguished for efficient services. An officer of Fort Sumter, on Saturday, called at the counting-room and subscribed for the Charleston Mercury to be mailed to him at Fort Sumter, for the next three months. The Florida Forts--Fort Pickens. The fact of the capture by the Georgia and Florida troops of the navy-yard at Pensacola, while it was under the command of Com. Armstrong, has been stated. A letter thus narrates the s
J. M. Brannan (search for this): article 1
n his countrymen. We do not believe that he will. Latest from the Key West fortifications. A letter from Key West, dated the 12th inst., says: The U. S. steamship Crusader, Lt. Com. Moffett, arrived on the morning of the 11th inst., from Mobile, via Havana. She is now at the naval wharf, coaling. The U. S. steamship Mohawk, Lt. Com. Craven, is at the naval wharf, repairing her boilers. Fort Taylor is now garrisoned by a company of U. S. artillery, in command of Capt. J. M. Brannan. Capt. E. B. Hunt, U. S. Corps of Engineers, is still in command of the fort, and is actively engaged in completing the work designed to be done with the present appropriation. The fort is so far completed as to be made available in case of foreign invasion. The armament mounted is sufficient to enable the Federal officers to act on the defensive, if necessary. Troops in Washington. A dispatch from Washington dated the 22d inst., says: One company of Sappers and Miner
The National crisis. withdrawal of the Senators of the seceding States--letter from Hon. George W. Summers--from Charleston — the Florida Forts — the Key West fortifications — troops in Washington, &c. Senators Davis. Yulee, Mallory, Clay and Fitzpatrick, who formally withdrew from the Senate chamber, left ten vacant seats in the Senate. Four others will be speedily added.--The Washington Constitution, speaking of the rest, says. To those who scan events more closely, the withdrawals of yesterday, succeeding others for short distance cannot but suggest painful spottage. It were had enough, if in the ordinary mutations of politics the Senate were being stripped of its most illustrious members: Statesmen who have earned distinction by the ability, the patriotism, and the purity of their ,and whose voices have been ever polite opposition to the current demagogism of the day. But the spectacle witnessed yesterday and to be witnessed again are many days more over<
ompany of U. S. artillery, in command of Capt. J. M. Brannan. Capt. E. B. Hunt, U. S. Corps of Engineers, is still in command of the fort, and is actively engaged in completing the work designed to be done with the present appropriation. The fort is so far completed as to be made available in case of foreign invasion. The armament mounted is sufficient to enable the Federal officers to act on the defensive, if necessary. Troops in Washington. A dispatch from Washington dated the 22d inst., says: One company of Sappers and Miners, numbering sixty-three rank and file, arrived here this morning from West Point. They are known there as the Engineer corps. Lieut. J. C. Duane is in command. Lieut. Wetzel is second in command. They have been under orders three weeks. They left West Point yesterday. One of the Dragoon corps of West Point are under orders, and will arrive here in a few days. They will bring with them a battery, consisting of four field-pieces and two howi
to make it so. The commander has committed the same act of hostility that Anderson did at Moultrie, but we do believe that he will soon surrender the fort, as the commandant at Baton Rouge did the arsenal, on the grounds of the presence of an overwhelming force, and the plea of avoiding useless blood shedding. He is reported to have said he would not fire on his countrymen. We do not believe that he will. Latest from the Key West fortifications. A letter from Key West, dated the 12th inst., says: The U. S. steamship Crusader, Lt. Com. Moffett, arrived on the morning of the 11th inst., from Mobile, via Havana. She is now at the naval wharf, coaling. The U. S. steamship Mohawk, Lt. Com. Craven, is at the naval wharf, repairing her boilers. Fort Taylor is now garrisoned by a company of U. S. artillery, in command of Capt. J. M. Brannan. Capt. E. B. Hunt, U. S. Corps of Engineers, is still in command of the fort, and is actively engaged in completing the work desig
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