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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: January 23, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Spottsylvania (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
alion, Greenville District, eighty-five persons volunteered. Laurens District has now nearly five hundred volunteers ready to march. The ladies of the Lower Battalion, in that District, tender their services to the volunteers to make clothes and do other work in furnishing an outfit for the company. The Palmetto Riflemen, of Greenville, have tendered their services to the Governor, and have been accepted. Four companies have been raised in Abbeville. Benjamin C. Rawley, of Spotsylvania, Va., aged 16 years, was on a visit to Petersburg, Va., when he heard of the occupation of Fort Sumter, and the probability of war against South Carolina. He immediately sent his horse home, and set out for Charleston, walking a great part of the way. On his arrival here, and the report of his intention, Colonel John S. Preston generously undertook to equip him, and he is now awaiting response from him to be enrolled as a recruit under Lieut. W. Hampton Gibbes. Columbus Daniel, 18 years o
Abbeville, S. C. (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
to an infantry company. In the Saluda Battalion, Greenville District, eighty-five persons volunteered. Laurens District has now nearly five hundred volunteers ready to march. The ladies of the Lower Battalion, in that District, tender their services to the volunteers to make clothes and do other work in furnishing an outfit for the company. The Palmetto Riflemen, of Greenville, have tendered their services to the Governor, and have been accepted. Four companies have been raised in Abbeville. Benjamin C. Rawley, of Spotsylvania, Va., aged 16 years, was on a visit to Petersburg, Va., when he heard of the occupation of Fort Sumter, and the probability of war against South Carolina. He immediately sent his horse home, and set out for Charleston, walking a great part of the way. On his arrival here, and the report of his intention, Colonel John S. Preston generously undertook to equip him, and he is now awaiting response from him to be enrolled as a recruit under Lieut. W. H
Lexington (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 1
ommonwealths, to say nothing of the men delicate relations and obvious duties of other States. Resolution is not justified, in his opinion, by the election of Lincoln, and such a step should be the last remedy sought by a border State.--It is a step which should be taken by none, but by it last of all. All its interests are against it, and none of its wrongs would be remedied by it. He recommends that the border States, slave and free, appoint Commissioners, to meet at Frankfort or Lexington, Ky., who shall devise some proposition of compromise, which shall be submitted by Congress to the people. In conclusion, he says: I take it for granted that the Convention, if called, will be elected and organized upon the basis of the qualified voters of the white population of the State, being the basis of the present House of Delegates, as arranged by the existing Constitution of the State. I am free to say that I could never consent to any more restricted basis. It will not be a
Frankfort (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 1
n neighboring Commonwealths, to say nothing of the men delicate relations and obvious duties of other States. Resolution is not justified, in his opinion, by the election of Lincoln, and such a step should be the last remedy sought by a border State.--It is a step which should be taken by none, but by it last of all. All its interests are against it, and none of its wrongs would be remedied by it. He recommends that the border States, slave and free, appoint Commissioners, to meet at Frankfort or Lexington, Ky., who shall devise some proposition of compromise, which shall be submitted by Congress to the people. In conclusion, he says: I take it for granted that the Convention, if called, will be elected and organized upon the basis of the qualified voters of the white population of the State, being the basis of the present House of Delegates, as arranged by the existing Constitution of the State. I am free to say that I could never consent to any more restricted basis.
Havana, N. Y. (New York, United States) (search for this): article 1
l soon surrender the fort, as the commandant at Baton Rouge did the arsenal, on the grounds of the presence of an overwhelming force, and the plea of avoiding useless blood shedding. He is reported to have said he would not fire on his countrymen. We do not believe that he will. Latest from the Key West fortifications. A letter from Key West, dated the 12th inst., says: The U. S. steamship Crusader, Lt. Com. Moffett, arrived on the morning of the 11th inst., from Mobile, via Havana. She is now at the naval wharf, coaling. The U. S. steamship Mohawk, Lt. Com. Craven, is at the naval wharf, repairing her boilers. Fort Taylor is now garrisoned by a company of U. S. artillery, in command of Capt. J. M. Brannan. Capt. E. B. Hunt, U. S. Corps of Engineers, is still in command of the fort, and is actively engaged in completing the work designed to be done with the present appropriation. The fort is so far completed as to be made available in case of foreign invasion.
Santa Rosa Island (Florida, United States) (search for this): article 1
ldiers present. Fort Pickens, with 200 U. S. soldiers, and mounting 212 guns, is commanded by Lieut. Slimmer, a native of New England, who refuses to surrender. A deserter of it says: Under the protection of its immense batteries the ships of an enemy could make good their harbor in the Bay of Pensacola, or if they did not care to run the risk from shore batteries, which could not be in very dangerous range, they could land forces and supplies on the fort to the eastward on Santa Rosa Island, which is some forty miles long, and thus throw in reinforcements and rendezvous even an army at the fort without interruption, unless of a force intrenched on the island itself, in the rear of the fort — which, however, is almost if not quite as defensible from rear as front. If we are to have war, the seizure of this stronghold is, of course, of the first importance, for unless it is occupied by us it will secure to the enemy a base of operation along our whole Gulf coast, and keep
Petersburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
unteered. Laurens District has now nearly five hundred volunteers ready to march. The ladies of the Lower Battalion, in that District, tender their services to the volunteers to make clothes and do other work in furnishing an outfit for the company. The Palmetto Riflemen, of Greenville, have tendered their services to the Governor, and have been accepted. Four companies have been raised in Abbeville. Benjamin C. Rawley, of Spotsylvania, Va., aged 16 years, was on a visit to Petersburg, Va., when he heard of the occupation of Fort Sumter, and the probability of war against South Carolina. He immediately sent his horse home, and set out for Charleston, walking a great part of the way. On his arrival here, and the report of his intention, Colonel John S. Preston generously undertook to equip him, and he is now awaiting response from him to be enrolled as a recruit under Lieut. W. Hampton Gibbes. Columbus Daniel, 18 years of age, has reached the city from Nashville, on a si
Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 1
it to Petersburg, Va., when he heard of the occupation of Fort Sumter, and the probability of war against South Carolina. He immediately sent his horse home, and set out for Charleston, walking a great part of the way. On his arrival here, and the report of his intention, Colonel John S. Preston generously undertook to equip him, and he is now awaiting response from him to be enrolled as a recruit under Lieut. W. Hampton Gibbes. Columbus Daniel, 18 years of age, has reached the city from Nashville, on a similar mission, and has been enrolled by Lieut. Gibbes. The anniversary of the battle of Cowpens was celebrated by the military at Morris' Island Saturday. While the festivities were at the height, three guns were fired by Maj. Anderson: but whether as a compliment to South Carolina, to her citizen soldiers, or to "the day we celebrate," has not transpired. Everything considered, it was possibly intended to remind all parties in the neighborhood that a foreign enemy was stil
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
was on a visit to Petersburg, Va., when he heard of the occupation of Fort Sumter, and the probability of war against South Carolina. He immediately sent his horse home, and set out for Charleston, walking a great part of the way. On his arrival heray. While the festivities were at the height, three guns were fired by Maj. Anderson: but whether as a compliment to South Carolina, to her citizen soldiers, or to "the day we celebrate," has not transpired. Everything considered, it was possibly intended to remind all parties in the neighborhood that a foreign enemy was still tolerated in the waters of South Carolina. The entertainment was continued until 5 o'clock, and all the participants agree in the opinion that it was a delightful celebration. The rank and office of Captain in the Navy of South Carolina, have been conferred on James H. North, late Lieutenant in the U. S. Navy, and honorably distinguished for efficient services. An officer of Fort Sumter, on Saturday, cal
West Point (New York, United States) (search for this): article 1
dispatch from Washington dated the 22d inst., says: One company of Sappers and Miners, numbering sixty-three rank and file, arrived here this morning from West Point. They are known there as the Engineer corps. Lieut. J. C. Duane is in command. Lieut. Wetzel is second in command. They have been under orders three weeks. They left West Point yesterday. One of the Dragoon corps of West Point are under orders, and will arrive here in a few days. They will bring with them a battery, consisting of four field-pieces and two howitzers, and act as flying artillery, under the command of Captain Griffin. They will bring seventy-eight of the best well traWest Point are under orders, and will arrive here in a few days. They will bring with them a battery, consisting of four field-pieces and two howitzers, and act as flying artillery, under the command of Captain Griffin. They will bring seventy-eight of the best well trained horses. The Sappers and Miners came into this city this morning just before daybreak, and proceeded quietly to the Columbian Armory, which had been previously arranged for them. They were armed with rifles and sabres.
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