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prompted him to adopt such a course. Taking of the Arsenal at Apalachicola. The Jacksonville (Fla.) Confederacy has the following account of the capture of this fort: At about 7 o'clock on the morning of the 6th inst., the arsenal at Apalachicola, at the mouth of the Chattahoochee river, was besieged by the troops of the State of Florida. In consequence of the weakness of the command, an entrance was gained. Mr. Powell, who has been in the service of the United States since 1840, and had command of the place, acted in a gallant manner. After the troops had entered he faced the line and thus addressed them: "Officers and Soldiers:--Five minutes ago I was the commander of this arsenal; but, in consequence of the weakness of my command, I am obliged to surrender — an act which I have hitherto never had to do during my whole military career. If I had force equal to, or even half the strength of your own, I'll be damned if you would ever have entered that gate unti
Clark, a colored barber of this city, has written a letter to Gov. Brown, offering to raise a company of free colored men, to be enlisted in the service of the State of Georgia in the present crisis. Whatever may be thought of the policy of enlisting soldiers of this cast, the offer is a patriotic one, and ought to show the "philanthropists" of the North that the free colored population of the South do not appreciate their efforts in behalf of the negro race. Joe served in the Indian war of 1836, and still limps occasionally from a wound received in that campaign. The Savannah News, of the 26th instant, mentions this rumor: While in Milledgeville, we heard a report that a mysterious craft had been seen cruising among the inlets of our Southern coast, in the neighborhood of Cumberland Island, and, further, that two men had been captured and lodged in jail at Enterprise, Fla., who were supposed to be the notorious Redpath and John Brown, Jr. We could not trace the report to
John Brown (search for this): article 1
ems from Georgia. Col. Ed. C. Anderson has been appointed Ordinance officer in chief of the State of Georgia. The Columbus (Ga.) Enquirer has the following paragraph: Joe Clark, a colored barber of this city, has written a letter to Gov. Brown, offering to raise a company of free colored men, to be enlisted in the service of the State of Georgia in the present crisis. Whatever may be thought of the policy of enlisting soldiers of this cast, the offer is a patriotic one, and ought tot had been seen cruising among the inlets of our Southern coast, in the neighborhood of Cumberland Island, and, further, that two men had been captured and lodged in jail at Enterprise, Fla., who were supposed to be the notorious Redpath and John Brown, Jr. We could not trace the report to its source, though taken in connection with the fact that those characters are rumored to have sailed recently from Boston in some secret expedition, there could seem to be a strong probability of its truth.
John Perkins (search for this): article 1
seized by the police of this State, but the city of New York should in no way be made responsible for the outrage. As Mayor, I have no authority over the police. If I had the power I should summarily punish the authors of this illegal and unjustifiable seizure of private property. Fernando Wood. Further particulars of the Secession of Louisiana. Baton Rouge, Jan. 26. --The vote on submitting the ordinance to the people was taken this morning — ayes 45, nays 84. John Perkins addressed the Convention on the passage of the Secession Ordinance. The debate closed, and a vote was ordered. The galleries and lobbies were intensely crowded, and a deathlike silence prevailed.--On the call of the roll many members were in tears. The Clerk announced the vote — ayes 113, nays 17--and the President declared Louisiana a free and sovereign republic. Capt. Allen then entered the Convention with a Pelican flag, accompanied by Governor Moore and staff, and
of the weakness of my command, I am obliged to surrender — an act which I have hitherto never had to do during my whole military career. If I had force equal to, or even half the strength of your own, I'll be damned if you would ever have entered that gate until you walked over my dead body. You see that I have but three men. These are laborers, and cannot contend against you. I now consider myself a prisoner of war.--Take my sword, Capt. Jones!" Captain Jones, of the Young Guard, of Quincy, received Mr. Powell's sword, and then returned it to him, and addressed him as follows: "My dear sir, take your sword; you are too brave a man to disarm." The whole command then gave three cheers for the gallant Powell. Mr. Powell is now making arrangements to turn over to the Federal Government the funds and papers in his possession belonging to Uncle Sam Mr. Powell is an officer of ability and experience. He has seen actual service in Mexico, and has received more than one wound whi
iled.--On the call of the roll many members were in tears. The Clerk announced the vote — ayes 113, nays 17--and the President declared Louisiana a free and sovereign republic. Capt. Allen then entered the Convention with a Pelican flag, accompanied by Governor Moore and staff, and put the flag in the hands of the President, amid tremendous excitement. A solemn prayer was then offered, and a hundred guns were fired. The Convention adjourned to meet in New Orleans on the 29th inst. Before the Convention adjourned the resolution accompanying the ordinance, declaring the right of free navigation of the Mississippi river and tributaries to all friendly States, and the right of egress and ingress to boats of the Mississippi by all friendly States and Powers, passed unanimously. A gold pen was given each member with which to sign the Ordinance of Secession. Items from Georgia. Col. Ed. C. Anderson has been appointed Ordinance officer in chief of the St
olored men, to be enlisted in the service of the State of Georgia in the present crisis. Whatever may be thought of the policy of enlisting soldiers of this cast, the offer is a patriotic one, and ought to show the "philanthropists" of the North that the free colored population of the South do not appreciate their efforts in behalf of the negro race. Joe served in the Indian war of 1836, and still limps occasionally from a wound received in that campaign. The Savannah News, of the 26th instant, mentions this rumor: While in Milledgeville, we heard a report that a mysterious craft had been seen cruising among the inlets of our Southern coast, in the neighborhood of Cumberland Island, and, further, that two men had been captured and lodged in jail at Enterprise, Fla., who were supposed to be the notorious Redpath and John Brown, Jr. We could not trace the report to its source, though taken in connection with the fact that those characters are rumored to have sailed recently
, That in our opinion the hasty and unwarrantable action of Gen. Sandford, in tendering his division to the Governor for coercive purposes, is not alone out of place, but in direct opposition to the wishes of the entire city-deeming, as we do, that selfish motives only prompted him to adopt such a course. Taking of the Arsenal at Apalachicola. The Jacksonville (Fla.) Confederacy has the following account of the capture of this fort: At about 7 o'clock on the morning of the 6th inst., the arsenal at Apalachicola, at the mouth of the Chattahoochee river, was besieged by the troops of the State of Florida. In consequence of the weakness of the command, an entrance was gained. Mr. Powell, who has been in the service of the United States since 1840, and had command of the place, acted in a gallant manner. After the troops had entered he faced the line and thus addressed them: "Officers and Soldiers:--Five minutes ago I was the commander of this arsenal; but, in con
February 22nd (search for this): article 1
ed with competent representatives of the popular will. The resolutions also deprecate any collision between the forces of the General Government and the seceding States, as such a calamity will strike a death blow to all hopes of settlement, but pledge the working men to sustain the Federal Government in the maintenance of its powers. The resolutions also provide for the appointment of Delegates to the National Convention of Working Men, which is to meet at Philadelphia on the 22d of February, and invite the Committee of Thirty-Three to be present. The resolutions were unanimously adopted. Meeting of Resident Southerners in New York. A meeting of the Southerners resident in New York was held the Thursday, over which James L. Poindexter presided. Among the resolutions adopted was one endorsing the Crittenden propositions and the following: Resolved, That we, the sons of the South, implore our fellow-citizens at home to pause, and before severing the holy
February 26th (search for this): article 1
Ga. In reply to your dispatch, I regret to say that arms intended for and consigned to the State of Georgia have been seized by the police of this State, but the city of New York should in no way be made responsible for the outrage. As Mayor, I have no authority over the police. If I had the power I should summarily punish the authors of this illegal and unjustifiable seizure of private property. Fernando Wood. Further particulars of the Secession of Louisiana. Baton Rouge, Jan. 26. --The vote on submitting the ordinance to the people was taken this morning — ayes 45, nays 84. John Perkins addressed the Convention on the passage of the Secession Ordinance. The debate closed, and a vote was ordered. The galleries and lobbies were intensely crowded, and a deathlike silence prevailed.--On the call of the roll many members were in tears. The Clerk announced the vote — ayes 113, nays 17--and the President declared Louisiana a free and sovereign rep
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