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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 4, 1861., [Electronic resource].

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actuate every citizen of Texas; but we should remember that we owe duties and obligations to States having rights in common with us, and whose institutions are the same as ours. No aggression can come upon us, which will not be visited upon them, and whatever our action may be, it should be of that character which will bear us blameless to posterity, should the step be fatal to the interests of those States. The London times on the Southern Confederacy. The London Times, of the 18th ultimo, has a long article on the "impending crisis" in America. It says: If South Carolina secedes, if Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, Louisiana follow, if a Southern federation be formed, and take its place among the Powers of the earth, there can be no hope of keeping the border slave States. These will be drawn by a natural affinity to detach themselves from the North, and join the slaveholding federa- tion. North Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, Missouri, Virginia,
The bark Caura. At Charleston, Va., last Saturday night, Mr. H. D. Rust was knocked down in the street, stabbed, and robbed of $165, by an unknown man. Rev. R. A. Arthur, minister of the M. E. Church at Charleston, Kanawha county, Va., has been elected Professor of Mathematics in the Ohio University, and has accepted. Rev. James Walton, of the Mississippi Conference, and presiding Elder for a number of years, died on the 21st, in Holmes county, in that State. Charles Lever, the novelist, is coming to America — the continent is getting too hot for him. He thinks the Atlantic should divide him and the bailiffs. A woman recently applied to the Duchess County (N. Y.) Courts for a divorce from her husband, on the ground that he habitually chewed tobacco. A converted pickpocket is the latest orthodox sensation in London. Crowds go to hear his sermons, which are very ordinary, and even vulgar in style. Stewart, the New York dry goods millionaire, having a
Arrests in January. --During the month of January; the arrests in this city were as follows: Upper Station-House--22 whites, 43 slaves and 6 free negroes; total 71. Lower Station-House--56 whites, 62 slaves and 23 free negroes; total 141. Whole number of arrests, 212. Arrests in January. --During the month of January; the arrests in this city were as follows: Upper Station-House--22 whites, 43 slaves and 6 free negroes; total 71. Lower Station-House--56 whites, 62 slaves and 23 free negroes; total 141. Whole number of arrests, 212.
Operations of the U. S. Mint. --The following statement of the United States Mint, at Philadelphia, for the month of January, shows the deposits of gold, from all sources, to have been $8,269,669.30. Silver --$156,413.60. Total--$8,366,082.93. Copper cents received in exchange for cents of new issue, $13,605. The gold coinage amounted to $8,052,321.69. Silver, $91,100. Copper-- $5,000. Total--$8,148,421.69. This is the largest amount ever coined in a single month at the United States Mint.
Marine disasters for January. --The usual monthly list of serious disasters to American sea-going vessels, is heavy. Two noticeable features are the unusual preponderance of large vessels, and the presence of the name of a United States sloop-of-war as a missing vessel. The whole number reported during the past month is 37, viz--1 sloop-of-war, 1 steamer, 13 ships, 8 barks, 4 brigs and 10 schooners. Of these 2 are missing, 21 wrecked, 4 burnt, 4 foundered, 4 abandoned, and 2 run down. The total value of the American mercantile craft lost, is estimated at $882,000 exclusive of cargoes.
January 8th (search for this): article 23
Inundation in Holland. --The dykes in Holland were broken in various places January 8th and 9th, sweeping away the houses of thousands of unfortunate creatures, who are wandering cold, hungry, and homeless upon the dykes. At night the rush of the torrent is distinctly heard at a considerable distance. --English paper.
January 9th (search for this): article 23
Inundation in Holland. --The dykes in Holland were broken in various places January 8th and 9th, sweeping away the houses of thousands of unfortunate creatures, who are wandering cold, hungry, and homeless upon the dykes. At night the rush of the torrent is distinctly heard at a considerable distance. --English paper.
January 15th (search for this): article 16
Commissioners from South Carolina before the French Minister of Foreign Affairs. --A letter to the editors of the French Courrierdes Etats Uais, dated Paris,January 15, states that the Commissioners from the State of South Carolina have arrived at Paris, and presented themselves to M. Thouvenel, the Minister of Foreign Affairs, who received them with becoming courtesy and respect, but without taking side with them, or making any engagements with them. The Commissioners were some days in Paris before presentation.
January 15th (search for this): article 2
New York, Feb. 1. --Cl'd. schr. T. J. Tull Petersburg. Arr'd, schr. Alice, Norfolk. Plymouth, Jan. 15. --Arr'd,schr. Europs, Wilmington,N. C., for London. Philadelphia, Feb. 1. --Arr'd, steamship City of Richmond, Richmond. Cl'd, schr. B. D. Pitts, Petersburg.Feb. 2-- Cl'd, schr. L. Andendried, Richmond. Lewis, Del., Feb. 1. -- Schr.Geo. F. Brown, of Cape May, Capt. Joline, bound to Norfolk with a load of wood, was towed in by the Atlantic, having been struck by a heavy squall from N. W., which carried away fore gaff and split fore sail, and the schooner would probably have foundered but for the timely aid of the Atlantic. Captain Jones, of the Forward, promptly offered assistance to repair damages.
January 22nd (search for this): article 1
hot shot is in readiness, like your steam fire engines, for firing up at any moment, and all the equipments for carnage piled up around the gun-carriages. The magazine has been buried in a cavern of sand-bags, and is believed to be beyond the reach of shot or shell. Every arrangement has been made, not only for the protection of the men, but for receiving the balls of Sumter with the least possible damage. Latest from Pensacola. A letter in the Mobile Tribune, dated Pensacola, Jan. 22d, gives some interesting intelligence from that point: The Wyandotte, carrying four guns, is lying off Fort Pickens. She was ordered in for repairs, and cannot fire her guns with safety.--She could easily be captured by boarding her. Lieut, Berryman, her commander, is friendly to the South, and a very much respected gentleman. His men say that they are "working for those who pay best." The rumor of the arrival of the Macedonian was occasioned by the Wyandotte's having to put to
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