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The National crisis. Interesting from the South--letter from Edward Everett — Comparative population of the Northern and Southern Confederacies — Washington dispatches. The Montgomery (Ala.) correspondent of the Charleston Mercury, writing on the 2d inst., of the Cotton States' Convention, says: Alabama's very equivocal invitation will bring a deputation from North Carolina, Tennessee, and perhaps other non-seceding States. What they will do here, it is difficult to say. Being in the Union, they cannot join in the deliberations to construct a Southern Confederacy. Their counsel and object doubtless will be delay — postponement; and in this policy they might support or make a party in the Convention, which may oppose immediate action and the organization of a Southern Confederacy. They will fail in their efforts, however, although they may foster discontent. The Mississippi State Convention elected a full representation to the Congress to be establishe<
Confederacy, to be submitted to the Conventions of the several States for their ratification or adoption. The Charleston Courier of Wednesday, speaking of Fort Sumter, says: Much excitement was caused on Tuesday, in very credulous circles, by a report that Fort Sumter had been reinforced. We do not believe it, but our readers can decide for themselves. We have had conversation with a citizen who left Fort Sumter on Sunday, and had been engaged there (and at Fort Moultrie) since November, as a workman. He reports forty-four laborers and ninety-six soldiers, (officers included,) remaining in the Fort, with a large supply of provisions.--Of these he specifies, according to his knowledge, fifty-eight barrels of pork and beef, five hogsheads of molasses, two casks of vinegar, with large supplies of flour and potatoes. The supply of fuel, which was good, had been lately increased by a drifting raft which was secured. As to the arms, our informant reports five Columbi
defeat compromise of any kind. The two sections — their strength in 1860. From the official census returns of 1860 are made the following tables of population in the North and the South, and in the Territories, showing the increase since 1850 in each section, and the alterations in the apportionment of members of Congress: Population of the Northern Confederacy. StatesPop'n. 1850Pop'n. 1860New Apportionment for Congr'ss.Old Apportionment. Maine583,169619,95856 N. Hampsh'e31768,48564 Iowa192,214682,00052 Minnestoa6,077172,79312 Oregon18,29452,55611 California92,597384,77032 Kansas--143,64511 Total13,454,16918,950,759150149 Increase in ten years5,496,590 Population of the Southern Confederacy. Pop'n in 1850.Pop'n in 1860.Appor't States.Free.Slave.Free.Slave.N. O. Delaw'e.89,2422,290110,4581,80511 Maryl'd492,66690,368646,18385,38266 Virginia949,133472,5281,097,873495,8261113 No. Car580,491288,548679,965328,37778 So.Car.283,523384,984308, 186407
t of the deliberations of the Convention differ. The ultra Republicans are endeavoring to defeat compromise of any kind. The two sections — their strength in 1860. From the official census returns of 1860 are made the following tables of population in the North and the South, and in the Territories, showing the increase 1860 are made the following tables of population in the North and the South, and in the Territories, showing the increase since 1850 in each section, and the alterations in the apportionment of members of Congress: Population of the Northern Confederacy. StatesPop'n. 1850Pop'n. 1860New Apportionment for Congr'ss.Old Apportionment. Maine583,169619,95856 N. Hampsh'e317,976326,07233 Vermont311,120315,82733 Mass994,5141,231,4941011 R. Islan,77032 Kansas--143,64511 Total13,454,16918,950,759150149 Increase in ten years5,496,590 Population of the Southern Confederacy. Pop'n in 1850.Pop'n in 1860.Appor't States.Free.Slave.Free.Slave.N. O. Delaw'e.89,2422,290110,4581,80511 Maryl'd492,66690,368646,18385,38266 Virginia949,133472,5281,097,873495,8261113 No
February 2nd, 1861 AD (search for this): article 1
ing towards the city, one towards Sullivan's Island, and one towards Fort Johnson. There are also four Columbiads, eight inches, bearing on Fort Morris, three of the same calibre on 'Cummings' Point, and four that can be brought to bear on Mount Pleasant or Sullivan's Island at choice. No reinforcements in men have been received. Letter from Hon. Edward Everett. The following letter was read at the great Union meeting held in Faneuil Hall, Boston, on Tuesday: Washington Feb. 2, 1861. My Dear Sir: --I much regret that it is not in my power to be present at the meeting to be held in Faneuil Hall next Tuesday. I have yielded, at the sacrifice of personal convenience, to the advice and request that I would prolong my stay at Washington, with a view to conference with members of Congress and other persons from various parts of the Union, who are uniting their counsels and efforts for its preservation. The crisis is one of greater danger and importance than has
ssing upon him, assuring him, that however much he might be cursed now by those who are disloyal to their country, he (Bouligny) would outlive them all in the affectionate memory of a glorious, Union loving, law-abiding people. The Aid to Gov. Andrews, of Massachusetts, is in Washington, and called to-day on Lieut. Gen. Scott, it is understood, to tender to him, in the name of Gov. Andrews, the services of Massachusetts militia. Gen. Scott listened to the proffer, and then replied, that thGov. Andrews, the services of Massachusetts militia. Gen. Scott listened to the proffer, and then replied, that the Government needed no volunteers, and if needed, Massachusetts would not be called upon. The Peace Convention held a four hour's session yesterday. Mr. Seddon, of Virginia, urged an immediate consideration of the Crittenden Compromise. A prolonged debate ensued, and finally, at the request of Mr. Guthrie, of Tennessee, the subject was laid over until to-day. Views as to the probable result of the deliberations of the Convention differ. The ultra Republicans are endeavoring to defeat co
ginia will wait to see whether that basis be accepted or rejected, " "What basis?" was asked. "The Crittenden propositions," was the reply. The speech of Mr. Bouligny, of Louisiana, in refusing to accede to the request of his Legislature, to withdraw from the House, not only produced a tremendous sensation at the time, among the members and spectators, but has won for him the praises of conservative Union- loving men everywhere. After the House adjourned, Mr. Crittenden met Mr. Bouligny, and, grasping him with both hands, invoked God's blessing upon him, assuring him, that however much he might be cursed now by those who are disloyal to their country, he (Bouligny) would outlive them all in the affectionate memory of a glorious, Union loving, law-abiding people. The Aid to Gov. Andrews, of Massachusetts, is in Washington, and called to-day on Lieut. Gen. Scott, it is understood, to tender to him, in the name of Gov. Andrews, the services of Massachusetts militia.
he Convention differ. The ultra Republicans are endeavoring to defeat compromise of any kind. The two sections — their strength in 1860. From the official census returns of 1860 are made the following tables of population in the North and the South, and in the Territories, showing the increase since 1850 in each section, and the alterations in the apportionment of members of Congress: Population of the Northern Confederacy. StatesPop'n. 1850Pop'n. 1860New Apportionment for Congr'ss.Old Apportionment. Maine583,169619,95856 N. Hampsh'e317,976326,07233 Vermont311,120315,82733 Mass994,5141,231,4941011 R. Island147,545174,62112 Connecticut370,792460,67044 New York3,097,3943,851,5633033 Pennsylv'a2,311,7862,916,0182325 New Jersey489,333676,03455 Ohio1,980,4272,377,9171921 Indiana988,4161,350,8021111 Illinois851,4701,691,233139 Michigan397,654754,29164 Wisconsin305,391768,48564 Iowa192,214682,00052 Minnestoa6,077172,79312 Oregon18,29452,55611 California92
Crittenden (search for this): article 1
ent for the abandonment of secession in Virginia. He said, "We will secede if our difficulties are not composed upon an equitable basis, and Virginia will wait to see whether that basis be accepted or rejected, " "What basis?" was asked. "The Crittenden propositions," was the reply. The speech of Mr. Bouligny, of Louisiana, in refusing to accede to the request of his Legislature, to withdraw from the House, not only produced a tremendous sensation at the time, among the members and spectators, but has won for him the praises of conservative Union- loving men everywhere. After the House adjourned, Mr. Crittenden met Mr. Bouligny, and, grasping him with both hands, invoked God's blessing upon him, assuring him, that however much he might be cursed now by those who are disloyal to their country, he (Bouligny) would outlive them all in the affectionate memory of a glorious, Union loving, law-abiding people. The Aid to Gov. Andrews, of Massachusetts, is in Washington, and
Edward Everett (search for this): article 1
The National crisis. Interesting from the South--letter from Edward Everett — Comparative population of the Northern and Southern Confederacies — Washington dispatches. The Montgomery (Ala.) correspondent of the Charleston Mercury, writing on the 2d inst., of the Cotton States' Convention, says: Alabama'sPoint, and four that can be brought to bear on Mount Pleasant or Sullivan's Island at choice. No reinforcements in men have been received. Letter from Hon. Edward Everett. The following letter was read at the great Union meeting held in Faneuil Hall, Boston, on Tuesday: Washington Feb. 2, 1861. My Dear Sir: -the cry go forth from Faneuil Hall, and ring through the land, that the Union must and shall be preserved! [Great cheering.] Your friend and fellow-citizen Edward Everett. Washington dispatches. The United States troops now in garrison in this city, in the vicinity of the War Department, the President's House, and the
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