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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: February 8, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Elizabethtown (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): article 3
Death of Rev.Dr. Murray. --Rev.Dr. Murray, of Elizabethtown, N. J., died on the 5thinst. The New York Express noticing his decease, says: He was the author of the celebrated Kirwan letters; distinguished himself by his arguments in behalf of the Protestant Religion against Archbishop Hughes. He stood high also both as an able controversialist and as a true Christian. As a Minister of Christ he preached not only a pure and undefiled personal piety, but obedience to the laws and a recognition of the powers that be. By aiming to discharge the duties of a good citizen as well as a good. Christian, he gave offence to the extreme Anti-Slavery men of the country, and was, therefore, very often assailed by them in the most bitter and personal manner. In the course of a recent visit to England, he was hunted by the Secretary of the British Anti-Slavery Society, who endeavored not only to keep him from being heard as an American clergyman, but also to withdraw from him the usual
Christian (search for this): article 3
press noticing his decease, says: He was the author of the celebrated Kirwan letters; distinguished himself by his arguments in behalf of the Protestant Religion against Archbishop Hughes. He stood high also both as an able controversialist and as a true Christian. As a Minister of Christ he preached not only a pure and undefiled personal piety, but obedience to the laws and a recognition of the powers that be. By aiming to discharge the duties of a good citizen as well as a good. Christian, he gave offence to the extreme Anti-Slavery men of the country, and was, therefore, very often assailed by them in the most bitter and personal manner. In the course of a recent visit to England, he was hunted by the Secretary of the British Anti-Slavery Society, who endeavored not only to keep him from being heard as an American clergyman, but also to withdraw from him the usual hospitalities extended to distinguished foreigners. The rejoinders of Dr. Murray will long be remembered for
Death of Rev.Dr. Murray. --Rev.Dr. Murray, of Elizabethtown, N. J., died on the 5thinst. The New York Express noticing his decease, says: He was the author of the celebrated Kirwan letters; distinguished himself by his arguments in behalf of the Protestant Religion against Archbishop Hughes. He stood high also both as an able controversialist and as a true Christian. As a Minister of Christ he preached not only a pure and undefiled personal piety, but obedience to the laws and a recognition of the powers that be. By aiming to discharge the duties of a good citizen as well as a good. Christian, he gave offence to the extreme Anti-Slavery men of the country, and was, therefore, very often assailed by them in the most bitter and personal manner. In the course of a recent visit to England, he was hunted by the Secretary of the British Anti-Slavery Society, who endeavored not only to keep him from being heard as an American clergyman, but also to withdraw from him the usual
Death of Rev.Dr. Murray. --Rev.Dr. Murray, of Elizabethtown, N. J., died on the 5thinst. The New York Express noticing his decease, says: He was the author of the celebrated Kirwan letters; distinguished himself by his arguments in behalf of the Protestant Religion against Archbishop Hughes. He stood high also both aDr. Murray, of Elizabethtown, N. J., died on the 5thinst. The New York Express noticing his decease, says: He was the author of the celebrated Kirwan letters; distinguished himself by his arguments in behalf of the Protestant Religion against Archbishop Hughes. He stood high also both as an able controversialist and as a true Christian. As a Minister of Christ he preached not only a pure and undefiled personal piety, but obedience to the laws and a recognition of the powers that be. By aiming to discharge the duties of a good citizen as well as a good. Christian, he gave offence to the extreme Anti-Slavery menhunted by the Secretary of the British Anti-Slavery Society, who endeavored not only to keep him from being heard as an American clergyman, but also to withdraw from him the usual hospitalities extended to distinguished foreigners. The rejoinders of Dr. Murray will long be remembered for their ability and excellence of temper.
Death of Rev.Dr. Murray. --Rev.Dr. Murray, of Elizabethtown, N. J., died on the 5thinst. The New York Express noticing his decease, says: He was the author of the celebrated Kirwan letters; distinguished himself by his arguments in behalf of the Protestant Religion against Archbishop Hughes. He stood high also both as an able controversialist and as a true Christian. As a Minister of Christ he preached not only a pure and undefiled personal piety, but obedience to the laws and a recognition of the powers that be. By aiming to discharge the duties of a good citizen as well as a good. Christian, he gave offence to the extreme Anti-Slavery men of the country, and was, therefore, very often assailed by them in the most bitter and personal manner. In the course of a recent visit to England, he was hunted by the Secretary of the British Anti-Slavery Society, who endeavored not only to keep him from being heard as an American clergyman, but also to withdraw from him the usual
Death of Rev.Dr. Murray. --Rev.Dr. Murray, of Elizabethtown, N. J., died on the 5thinst. The New York Express noticing his decease, says: He was the author of the celebrated Kirwan letters; distinguished himself by his arguments in behalf of the Protestant Religion against Archbishop Hughes. He stood high also both as an able controversialist and as a true Christian. As a Minister of Christ he preached not only a pure and undefiled personal piety, but obedience to the laws and a recognition of the powers that be. By aiming to discharge the duties of a good citizen as well as a good. Christian, he gave offence to the extreme Anti-Slavery men of the country, and was, therefore, very often assailed by them in the most bitter and personal manner. In the course of a recent visit to England, he was hunted by the Secretary of the British Anti-Slavery Society, who endeavored not only to keep him from being heard as an American clergyman, but also to withdraw from him the usua
Death of Rev.Dr. Murray. --Rev.Dr. Murray, of Elizabethtown, N. J., died on the 5thinst. The New York Express noticing his decease, says: He was the author of the celebrated Kirwan letters; distinguished himself by his arguments in behalf of the Protestant Religion against Archbishop Hughes. He stood high also both as an able controversialist and as a true Christian. As a Minister of Christ he preached not only a pure and undefiled personal piety, but obedience to the laws and a recognition of the powers that be. By aiming to discharge the duties of a good citizen as well as a good. Christian, he gave offence to the extreme Anti-Slavery men of the country, and was, therefore, very often assailed by them in the most bitter and personal manner. In the course of a recent visit to England, he was hunted by the Secretary of the British Anti-Slavery Society, who endeavored not only to keep him from being heard as an American clergyman, but also to withdraw from him the usua