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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: February 18, 1861., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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France (France) (search for this): article 5
may be declared valid, has never had any intention, to contest, and does not now contest, the civil and political effects of the union contracted in 1807 by his father with the Princess Catherine of Wurtemburg." M. Berryer followed on the same side in an uninterrupted speech of four hours and a half, when the Court rose for a recess. On resuming, M. Allon opened the case for Prince Napoleon, and was bold enough to say that the eloquent advocate opposed to him "had very little hopes of winning his case." He rests his case entirely upon the law of France, at the time, of the provisions of which, he says, Miss Patterson was well aware, when she said, "If I can be his wife for an hour I will run the risk;" and that, knowing the legal objections to the marriage, she had not contracted it in good faith. On the conclusion of his speech the Court adjourned for a week. The Paris papers are absolutely silent on the subject --even the fact of the trial is not mentioned in their news columns.
Paris, Ky. (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 5
The Bonaparte suit. --By the New York's mails we have further particulars of the great case of Patterson. vs. Bonaparte, which was opened at Paris, before the First Chambers of the Civil Tribunal of the Seine, on Friday, the 25th of last month, as our readers are aware from what has already appeared in the Herald. From the very natural curiosity which the case excites, the court-room was as full as it could possibly be. The proceedings were opened by M. Legrand, acout for Mrs. Elizabeth Patterson, presenting the following conclusions: "That it may please the Tribunal to declare the marriage contracted on the 24th of December, 1803, between the late Prince Jerome and Elizabeth Patterson valid. And also to take judicial cognizance (donner acte) that M. Bonaparte, while demanding that the marriage of the 24th of December,1803, may be declared valid, has never had any intention, to contest, and does not now contest, the civil and political effects of the union contracted in 180
Department de Ville de Paris (France) (search for this): article 5
ay be declared valid, has never had any intention, to contest, and does not now contest, the civil and political effects of the union contracted in 1807 by his father with the Princess Catherine of Wurtemburg." M. Berryer followed on the same side in an uninterrupted speech of four hours and a half, when the Court rose for a recess. On resuming, M. Allon opened the case for Prince Napoleon, and was bold enough to say that the eloquent advocate opposed to him "had very little hopes of winning his case." He rests his case entirely upon the law of France, at the time, of the provisions of which, he says, Miss Patterson was well aware, when she said, "If I can be his wife for an hour I will run the risk;" and that, knowing the legal objections to the marriage, she had not contracted it in good faith. On the conclusion of his speech the Court adjourned for a week. The Paris papers are absolutely silent on the subject --even the fact of the trial is not mentioned in their news columns.
M. Legrand (search for this): article 5
The Bonaparte suit. --By the New York's mails we have further particulars of the great case of Patterson. vs. Bonaparte, which was opened at Paris, before the First Chambers of the Civil Tribunal of the Seine, on Friday, the 25th of last month, as our readers are aware from what has already appeared in the Herald. From the very natural curiosity which the case excites, the court-room was as full as it could possibly be. The proceedings were opened by M. Legrand, acout for Mrs. Elizabeth Patterson, presenting the following conclusions: "That it may please the Tribunal to declare the marriage contracted on the 24th of December, 1803, between the late Prince Jerome and Elizabeth Patterson valid. And also to take judicial cognizance (donner acte) that M. Bonaparte, while demanding that the marriage of the 24th of December,1803, may be declared valid, has never had any intention, to contest, and does not now contest, the civil and political effects of the union contracted in 1807
M. Bonaparte (search for this): article 5
The Bonaparte suit. --By the New York's mails we have further particulars of the great case of Patterson. vs. Bonaparte, which was opened at Paris, before the First Chambers of the Civil Tribunal of the Seine, on Friday, the 25th of last month, as our readers are aware from what has already appeared in the Herald. From the Bonaparte, which was opened at Paris, before the First Chambers of the Civil Tribunal of the Seine, on Friday, the 25th of last month, as our readers are aware from what has already appeared in the Herald. From the very natural curiosity which the case excites, the court-room was as full as it could possibly be. The proceedings were opened by M. Legrand, acout for Mrs. Elizabeth Patterson, presenting the following conclusions: "That it may please the Tribunal to declare the marriage contracted on the 24th of December, 1803, between the late Prince Jerome and Elizabeth Patterson valid. And also to take judicial cognizance (donner acte) that M. Bonaparte, while demanding that the marriage of the 24th of December,1803, may be declared valid, has never had any intention, to contest, and does not now contest, the civil and political effects of the union contracted in 18
Elizabeth Patterson (search for this): article 5
The Bonaparte suit. --By the New York's mails we have further particulars of the great case of Patterson. vs. Bonaparte, which was opened at Paris, before the First Chambers of the Civil Tribunal of the Seine, on Friday, the 25th of last montxcites, the court-room was as full as it could possibly be. The proceedings were opened by M. Legrand, acout for Mrs. Elizabeth Patterson, presenting the following conclusions: "That it may please the Tribunal to declare the marriage contracted on the 24th of December, 1803, between the late Prince Jerome and Elizabeth Patterson valid. And also to take judicial cognizance (donner acte) that M. Bonaparte, while demanding that the marriage of the 24th of December,1803, may be declared valid, hnning his case." He rests his case entirely upon the law of France, at the time, of the provisions of which, he says, Miss Patterson was well aware, when she said, "If I can be his wife for an hour I will run the risk;" and that, knowing the legal ob
M. Berryer (search for this): article 5
ease the Tribunal to declare the marriage contracted on the 24th of December, 1803, between the late Prince Jerome and Elizabeth Patterson valid. And also to take judicial cognizance (donner acte) that M. Bonaparte, while demanding that the marriage of the 24th of December,1803, may be declared valid, has never had any intention, to contest, and does not now contest, the civil and political effects of the union contracted in 1807 by his father with the Princess Catherine of Wurtemburg." M. Berryer followed on the same side in an uninterrupted speech of four hours and a half, when the Court rose for a recess. On resuming, M. Allon opened the case for Prince Napoleon, and was bold enough to say that the eloquent advocate opposed to him "had very little hopes of winning his case." He rests his case entirely upon the law of France, at the time, of the provisions of which, he says, Miss Patterson was well aware, when she said, "If I can be his wife for an hour I will run the risk;" and
n valid. And also to take judicial cognizance (donner acte) that M. Bonaparte, while demanding that the marriage of the 24th of December,1803, may be declared valid, has never had any intention, to contest, and does not now contest, the civil and political effects of the union contracted in 1807 by his father with the Princess Catherine of Wurtemburg." M. Berryer followed on the same side in an uninterrupted speech of four hours and a half, when the Court rose for a recess. On resuming, M. Allon opened the case for Prince Napoleon, and was bold enough to say that the eloquent advocate opposed to him "had very little hopes of winning his case." He rests his case entirely upon the law of France, at the time, of the provisions of which, he says, Miss Patterson was well aware, when she said, "If I can be his wife for an hour I will run the risk;" and that, knowing the legal objections to the marriage, she had not contracted it in good faith. On the conclusion of his speech the Court a
The Bonaparte suit. --By the New York's mails we have further particulars of the great case of Patterson. vs. Bonaparte, which was opened at Paris, before the First Chambers of the Civil Tribunal of the Seine, on Friday, the 25th of last month, as our readers are aware from what has already appeared in the Herald. From the very natural curiosity which the case excites, the court-room was as full as it could possibly be. The proceedings were opened by M. Legrand, acout for Mrs. Elizabeth Patterson, presenting the following conclusions: "That it may please the Tribunal to declare the marriage contracted on the 24th of December, 1803, between the late Prince Jerome and Elizabeth Patterson valid. And also to take judicial cognizance (donner acte) that M. Bonaparte, while demanding that the marriage of the 24th of December,1803, may be declared valid, has never had any intention, to contest, and does not now contest, the civil and political effects of the union contracted in 1807
December 24th, 1803 AD (search for this): article 5
urt-room was as full as it could possibly be. The proceedings were opened by M. Legrand, acout for Mrs. Elizabeth Patterson, presenting the following conclusions: "That it may please the Tribunal to declare the marriage contracted on the 24th of December, 1803, between the late Prince Jerome and Elizabeth Patterson valid. And also to take judicial cognizance (donner acte) that M. Bonaparte, while demanding that the marriage of the 24th of December,1803, may be declared valid, has never had a 24th of December,1803, may be declared valid, has never had any intention, to contest, and does not now contest, the civil and political effects of the union contracted in 1807 by his father with the Princess Catherine of Wurtemburg." M. Berryer followed on the same side in an uninterrupted speech of four hours and a half, when the Court rose for a recess. On resuming, M. Allon opened the case for Prince Napoleon, and was bold enough to say that the eloquent advocate opposed to him "had very little hopes of winning his case." He rests his case entirely
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